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-   -   How do you take a snapshot? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=835534)

HowToHockey 10-29-2010 09:51 AM

How do you take a snapshot?
 
Hey guys, here is an article and video I did on how to take a snapshot
There are a few ways to take the snapshot, I notice most older guys just do a half slapshot and call that the snapshot, but younger guys do more of a modified wrist shot by pulling the puck in with the toe, and then snapping. I explain it in the article and video. How do you take your snapshot?
How to take a snapshot video

Blueland89 10-29-2010 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beavboyz (Post 28610202)
Hey guys, here is an article and video I did on how to take a snapshot
There are a few ways to take the snapshot, I notice most older guys just do a half slapshot and call that the snapshot, but younger guys do more of a modified wrist shot by pulling the puck in with the toe, and then snapping. I explain it in the article and video. How do you take your snapshot?
How to take a snapshot video

The way I've learned you come down on the ice like you are trying to take a chip shot if tat makes any sense. like it's more of you trying to get under the ice. You come down stright to the ice then push through to get a good flex, just like with a slapshot hitting the ice about 2 inches in front on the puck.

jsykes 10-29-2010 01:55 PM

little OT, but what blade pattern are you using there?

Jarick 10-29-2010 02:02 PM

I'm going to guess a Datsyuk :)

Good video.

I take a snap shot like you do, except I don't push the puck ahead of the blade before I shoot.

BadHammy* 10-29-2010 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 28614349)
I'm going to guess a Datsyuk :)

Good video.

I take a snap shot like you do, except I don't push the puck ahead of the blade before I shoot.

When you're skating forward, it's best to push forward and toward your body in the same motion. Works really well for me.

Jarick 10-29-2010 03:26 PM

How do you mean?

For me, I skate forward, cup the puck, and shoot as quickly as possible. Sometimes I drag the puck in to the body, then shoot. I don't ever tap the puck forward and shoot...just try to release the puck as quick as possible to beat the goalie.

noobman 10-29-2010 03:52 PM

My snapshot is kind of similar, but instead of doing the toe-drag I load my stick while the blade is a few inches from the puck and then launch it like a regular shot.

I'd have to go take a few and figure out what I'm doing before I can sit down and explain it step-by-step

HowToHockey 10-29-2010 10:29 PM

Interesting to hear the variations. I'm not sure how far I really push the puck forwards when I am skating and shooting. I do it very quickly so when looking at it at full speed you probably wouldn't notice. I find pushing the puck an inch or so ahead of the blade helps me load the stick before the blade catches up to the puck again.

SouthpawTRK 10-29-2010 11:49 PM

Thanks for the very helpful video on the snap shot! I'm looking forward to the next time I go to stick/puck so I can work on the snap shot. Not to say that I have even a decent slap shot or wrist shot, but the snap shot is by far the worst (least accurate, least consistent and least powerful) of all my shots.

BadHammy* 10-29-2010 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beavboyz (Post 28625381)
Interesting to hear the variations. I'm not sure how far I really push the puck forwards when I am skating and shooting. I do it very quickly so when looking at it at full speed you probably wouldn't notice. I find pushing the puck an inch or so ahead of the blade helps me load the stick before the blade catches up to the puck again.

It's also powerfully deceptive. I go for about 2 inches btw.

Puckclektr 10-30-2010 01:07 AM

Off topic but where did you get the shooting board or fake ice and how much was it. Thanks

Jarick 10-30-2010 01:43 AM

Had two snapper goals tonight high glove and on both the goalie didn't react at all. Very quick shot, love it. He even said he had no clue what was going on. On my regular goalie, I've done the toe drag to snapper high glove and asked him about it and he says when you drag the puck in and shoot it with no windup like that, he has absolutely no idea where it's going.

All very effective...best shot for a forward IMO, essential to practice once you get the basic wrister down.

Blueland89 10-30-2010 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puckclektr (Post 28627290)
Off topic but where did you get the shooting board or fake ice and how much was it. Thanks

you can get them from any online hockey shop. i got mine from Totalhockey

ponder 10-30-2010 09:39 AM

The snap shot is pretty much my go-to shot from around the top of the circle down, just love it. I do it very similar to in this video, although to bet the puck moving/create that bit of separation I more just move the puck straight forward instead of forward and in. It's gotten to the point where there's virtually no difference between my wrister and snapper though, other than banging in dirty goals around the net like 90% of my shots are these sort of snap/wrist hybrids, and the other 10% slappers.

HowToHockey 10-30-2010 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsykes (Post 28614224)
little OT, but what blade pattern are you using there?

Datsyuk

HowToHockey 10-30-2010 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puckclektr (Post 28627290)
Off topic but where did you get the shooting board or fake ice and how much was it. Thanks

The roll-up shooting pad I got from HockeyShot I had the pro-sized to start and then got the roll-up one. The Roll-up is by far my favourite, it is a big size (8 feet by 4 feet) and about the same price as the pro-size which is smaller.

Check out my roll-up shooting pad review if you want, I did a review of the bungee cord model so you can also practice passing and one-timers.
You can also save $10 if you use this coupon HOWHCKY001

Splitbtw 11-03-2010 10:08 PM

Instead of pulling it in with the toe, I stick-handle normally and hesitate a little bit to load the stick and then fire. It's almost like a little tap.

berzark 11-04-2010 09:16 PM

Im having a hard time loading the flex on my stick on snapshots.. I dont really get the putting weight on my bottom hand when I need to lift the stick up.. Does it do it automaticly when doing the normal weight transfer or do I actually have to push on the ground?

Also I used to shoot my snappers just like you said in the video minus the 3rd step.. As in I closed my blade, open it when I hit the puck and kind of pointed to the net but didnt close the blade up again. I'm confused, why would you want to do that? Its kind of an awkward movement and I dont understand how it can help your shot?

Thanks to those who will answer ! Learning a lot here !

BadHammy* 11-04-2010 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by berzark (Post 28742703)
Im having a hard time loading the flex on my stick on snapshots.. I dont really get the putting weight on my bottom hand when I need to lift the stick up.. Does it do it automaticly when doing the normal weight transfer or do I actually have to push on the ground?

Also I used to shoot my snappers just like you said in the video minus the 3rd step.. As in I closed my blade, open it when I hit the puck and kind of pointed to the net but didnt close the blade up again. I'm confused, why would you want to do that? Its kind of an awkward movement and I dont understand how it can help your shot?

Thanks to those who will answer ! Learning a lot here !

A couple thoughts. 1)The more you close the blade on the follow thru, the lower the shot will stay 2)Don't focus on loading the stick, a snapper needs to be released quickly and deceptively. It's really not a power shot 3)Keep your weight all on your inside leg when you take the snapper in motion.

Analyzer 11-04-2010 10:02 PM

For the most part, I just do a half slapshot.

I do what was done in the video, because it is deceptive. You have the puck out, so the goalie squares up to that, then you pull it in close and get it off quickly. It helps catch the goalie out of position slightly.

BadHammy* 11-12-2010 01:15 AM

Here's a video that might help. It's not great but it's a good primer for beginners.



There are a few things he does wrong, which I feel obligated to point out. First off, his weight transfer is poor, especially in motion. When skating, it's critical to get all your weight to your inside leg just before you release. That's the left leg is you're a LH shooter. It's actually a multi-step process that few non-advanced players understand. He also doesn't follow through strong at all (symptom of a poor weight transfer?).

Step 1) Start with the puck out away from your body and keep your weight on your outside leg, for me, LH, this is my right leg as the puck is out to the left of me. You should feel it in the front side of your outside leg because you're heavily relying on hip rotation to generate the transfer toward your inside leg. 2)Then as I pull the puck in closer to my body, I shift the weight to my left leg, the inside leg. I don't just lift my outside leg up though. I take a stride off it first. 3)Then as you're transferring the weight to your inside leg, let the puck get a little ahead of your blade and snap it off. Remember to let it roll down the blade a bit, similar to the wrister and get anywhere from 1 to 3 inches ahead of your blade. Snap your wrists to finish. A great trick for deception is to do it without ever looking down at the puck. Use the feel of you blade instead of looking down at the puck. This DESTROYS goalies. If you do all this successfully and relatively quickly with some accuracy, it's almost unstoppable at any level, up to professional. You can practice this off ice, with just a stick, no puck necessary. Muscle memory is extremely important because it is far more complex than a wrist or slap shot. Keep in mind that if you're really flying at a high speed, this requires you to slow down a little, just enough to coast onto your outside leg.

I also have to pick a bone with Jeremy's video. Weight transfer is the whole trick in the snap shot, it's just that most people don't know how to do it right because it's very tricky. Don't focus on flexing the stick, just try for a deceptive, abrupt release and do the weight transfer properly, the stick will load itself and your shot will be a bullet, I guarantee that.

I actually paid a private coach, guy had an INSANE snapper 160 lbs but he's broken goalies fingers and hands off snappers many times. He played in the Q and ECHL but he got a couple bad concussions, anyway, a while back just to let me watch him and skate next to him as he shot. I was actually taking mental notes the whole time, it worked.

Fleuryoutside29 11-12-2010 08:49 AM

I pull the puck in with the toes (basically cupping, like mentioned above), and snap.

Jarick 11-12-2010 09:11 AM

That's why I like this video:



An actual NHL'er doing the shots over and over again, and in motion to boot. Follow that form and you'll improve.

Blueland89 11-12-2010 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 28896761)
That's why I like this video:



An actual NHL'er doing the shots over and over again, and in motion to boot. Follow that form and you'll improve.

Thats a really good video points out some things i've never heard or thought about. Catching the puck ont he inside foot that is brilliant

berzark 11-12-2010 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 28896761)
That's why I like this video:



An actual NHL'er doing the shots over and over again, and in motion to boot. Follow that form and you'll improve.


I still don't understand why you guys say you have to do this motion when shooting:

--> / --> |o --> / o

In the video you can see the nhler doing it like this:

--> / --> |o --> \ o

It seems non logical to close your blade, open it up and close it back again afterwards..


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