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BlackNYellow 03-12-2011 08:08 PM

Wrist Shot Questions
 
Hey guys, so I am new here along with also being new to Ice Hockey, Hockey in general really. I am 22 (a little late to just be starting, I know :p) and I have been working a lot on my skating which has improved drastically. I got all of my gear a few weeks back (the rest of what was left to get, been getting things one or two pieces at a time). I also just started going to sticktime and pick-up games (as the pick-up games here in Arizona on the weekdays have a grand total of maybe 7 people total on a good day) and have been working on puck handling for the most part, and as of late have been taking my wimpy piss poor shots at the empty nets. Well long story short, I cannot get lift on my wrist shots which I am trying to learn, mind you it has only been a few weeks with a stick/puck combo for me so I realize I need to practice. But I just can't seem to grasp the concept of the lift.

I know to go from heel to toe (creating spin), shift the weight from my back to front or leading leg, snap the wrist (that is where I get lost, when people say 'snap the wrist' what exactly am I flicking or what does that motion entail?), finally the last part of following through and turning the blade 'over' in the follow through, how can one turn it 'over' when essentially you are trying to 'scoop' the puck to get the lift, unless of course I am completely wrong and there is no scoop?

Please if anyone has some pointers or tips I am open to all and any suggestions. I think I have watched and possibly read every article and used every google search term for a hockey wrist shot, just looking to maybe hear what has helped some of you guys out..

Thanks in advance!

mhkehoe 03-12-2011 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlackNYellow (Post 31626651)
Hey guys, so I am new here along with also being new to Ice Hockey, Hockey in general really. I am 22 (a little late to just be starting, I know :p) and I have been working a lot on my skating which has improved drastically. I got all of my gear a few weeks back (the rest of what was left to get, been getting things one or two pieces at a time). I also just started going to sticktime and pick-up games (as the pick-up games here in Arizona on the weekdays have a grand total of maybe 7 people total on a good day) and have been working on puck handling for the most part, and as of late have been taking my wimpy piss poor shots at the empty nets. Well long story short, I cannot get lift on my wrist shots which I am trying to learn, mind you it has only been a few weeks with a stick/puck combo for me so I realize I need to practice. But I just can't seem to grasp the concept of the lift.

I know to go from heel to toe (creating spin), shift the weight from my back to front or leading leg, snap the wrist (that is where I get lost, when people say 'snap the wrist' what exactly am I flicking or what does that motion entail?), finally the last part of following through and turning the blade 'over' in the follow through, how can one turn it 'over' when essentially you are trying to 'scoop' the puck to get the lift, unless of course I am completely wrong and there is no scoop?

Please if anyone has some pointers or tips I am open to all and any suggestions. I think I have watched and possibly read every article and used every google search term for a hockey wrist shot, just looking to maybe hear what has helped some of you guys out..

Thanks in advance!

While technique is going to play a big part in getting shots off the ice, what curve are you using?

I played years with a PM9/Forsberg/Zetterberg curve on ice, and when I started playing some outdoor roller I bought a Jagr/C21 and couldn't stop shooting the puck over the net on wrist shots. Point is, a flatter/closed blade like the PM9 is going to make getting shots off the ground harder.

I wouldn't be able to give you any advice on your shot since I can't actually see your technique, but where is the puck in relation to your body on your shot? I have some team mates new to hockey and they try to shoot way too far in front of their bodies.

Take a look at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIUu28w04Gw

I feel like I am loading a sling shot when I am really trying to put some power behind it.

ponder 03-12-2011 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlackNYellow (Post 31626651)
Hey guys, so I am new here along with also being new to Ice Hockey, Hockey in general really. I am 22 (a little late to just be starting, I know :p) and I have been working a lot on my skating which has improved drastically. I got all of my gear a few weeks back (the rest of what was left to get, been getting things one or two pieces at a time). I also just started going to sticktime and pick-up games (as the pick-up games here in Arizona on the weekdays have a grand total of maybe 7 people total on a good day) and have been working on puck handling for the most part, and as of late have been taking my wimpy piss poor shots at the empty nets. Well long story short, I cannot get lift on my wrist shots which I am trying to learn, mind you it has only been a few weeks with a stick/puck combo for me so I realize I need to practice. But I just can't seem to grasp the concept of the lift.

I know to go from heel to toe (creating spin), shift the weight from my back to front or leading leg, snap the wrist (that is where I get lost, when people say 'snap the wrist' what exactly am I flicking or what does that motion entail?), finally the last part of following through and turning the blade 'over' in the follow through, how can one turn it 'over' when essentially you are trying to 'scoop' the puck to get the lift, unless of course I am completely wrong and there is no scoop?

Please if anyone has some pointers or tips I am open to all and any suggestions. I think I have watched and possibly read every article and used every google search term for a hockey wrist shot, just looking to maybe hear what has helped some of you guys out..

Thanks in advance!

Sounds like you're on the right track, mostly it just takes practice, but you're off on a few points. There should be absolutely no scooping with any shot, period, you will never get any power trying to scoop the puck. Just start with the puck well back and your weight on your back foot, slide it forward focusing on keeping pressure down on the stick so you get some flex, and roll/snap your wrists through the shot, especially at the end (the roll/snap is the same thing). When you execute it properly the puck naturally rises off the release, no need for any sort of scooping or chipping up motion. Through the shot you should be transferring your weight from your back to your front foot, you can also take snap shots off the inside foot but that's an advanced shot that you shouldn't worry about for now. Here's a good video of Kessel shooting in ultra slow-mo that shows how the puck naturally elevates without chipping/scooping, and also shows the wrist roll/snap at the end:



This is a snap shot off the inside foot, as I said above it's a tough/advanced shot, so don't worry about most of what he's doing, just take note of how he flexes the stick and snaps/rolls his wrists.

kr580 03-12-2011 09:19 PM

Here's a good overall explanation of the motion used. Be sure to check out the rest of his videos for some good tips:


Here's the video that made my wristshots click finally, explanation of snapping your wrists:

BlackNYellow 03-12-2011 09:48 PM

Thanks guys! I will take all of your tips into consideration.

@mhkehoe - The stick that I am using is a Bauer One20 PM9 (go figure, the one stick you had mentioned you had troubles with, maybe I will pick up another wood stick and try different curves, or go with a shaft/blade combo)

@ponder - I will definitely try and not 'scoop' the puck I am assuming that with the flex kicking somewhat under the puck along with natural laws of physics (that make complete sense in my head yet I cannot explain here) the puck as you said will eventually 'lift' with enough force behind it, as for now my shot is WEAK SAUCE! :D

@kr580 - That last video of the 'flick/roll' motion was helpful and will try it out or practice that.

I think that I need to just learn the basic stickhandling first before I go to much further, yet still practice shooting.

Thanks again guys!

SouthpawTRK 03-12-2011 10:32 PM

Check out this link of Cammalleri's wrist shot; one of my favorites by far

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNDqs...ext=1&index=14

Jarick 03-13-2011 12:12 AM

To me, the wrist shot is propelling the puck by pushing it with the blade. That may seem obvious, but there's a distinction between pushing the puck and slapping at it. You cradle the puck and propel it forward, like you would a pass, rather than hitting it for an instant. Does that make sense?

You raise the puck by getting it to "stick" to the blade and then opening the face of the blade. Now I mean "stick" to the blade as in, you cradle the puck as it's behind your body, and then you push it forward. Opening the face of the blade means that you rotate your wrists so the blade faces up rather than down. So once you're pushing the puck forward, open up your wrists to open up the blade face, and that will let the puck go up in the air rather than sliding along the ice.

Now, one crucial thing needs to happen in order for this to work: you've got to roll the puck heel-to-toe. That lets the puck "grab" onto the face of the blade and follow it wherever you direct it, be it along the ice, up in the air, to the left, or to the right.

The final step in putting it all together is the wrist snap. As you get better at taking wrist shots, you'll want to close up the blade as the video above shows, and do so very quickly, almost violently. I only recommend learning this after you've gotten the above steps. It took me maybe a year to get to this point, so don't get frustrated if it doesn't happen right away. But snapping the wrists allows you to get extra velocity on the shot, because it's putting extra spin on the puck at the release point. That makes the puck fly flatter and helps your accuracy as well.

Now when it comes to loading the stick, taking snap shots, etc, those are all important factors, but start with what I've described to build up your hand-eye coordination and your forearm/wrist strength. Then move on to the advanced shots.

BlackNYellow 03-13-2011 10:19 AM

Thanks again for all of the replies! They are all great. Come Tuesday I will put all these tips into practice!

Noir 03-13-2011 12:57 PM

I didn't see you mentioning it but how far back are you winding your shot?

The farther back you wind your wrister, the better velocity, more height (if needed). Considering you've just begun, I don't think you have the comfort (or balance) to be able to completely utilize the wind up for a good wrister.

Which makes me think is the crux of your problem; and that's why you're currently experiencing weak wristers.


edit: by wind-up I don't mean the traditional wind up on a shot like a slapper or snapper when one has to lift his/her stick. What I mean is how far back your starting position of your shot is.

BlackNYellow 03-13-2011 01:06 PM

@Noir - I am positioning the stick about even with my back foot or 6" behind my back foot. I know it should be further back, but as you had mentioned I am trying to get the feel for the entire process of the shot.

HowToHockey 03-13-2011 01:26 PM

Hey bud, for the one video about "flicking the wrists" I think he over exagerates it a bit, I tried flicking my wrists like he shows in the video and it just feels weird but there is that natural flick motion needed in the wrist shot. Let me break it down:

Think of the blade as being closed, open, closed

You start with the blade closed on the puck (cupping it) this lets you use your muscles properly to put a lot of power into the shot
You pull the puck in, and the blade will naturally open up
Once the puck is almost in front of you the blade will be open and this causes the puck to roll up on the blade
At this point you roll your hands over or close the blade to put an extra bit of power on your shot and it helps for aim.

I explain it at the beginning of this video, it's for the snapshot but similar physics for the wrist shot.


Noir 03-13-2011 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlackNYellow (Post 31638999)
@Noir - I am positioning the stick about even with my back foot or 6" behind my back foot. I know it should be further back, but as you had mentioned I am trying to get the feel for the entire process of the shot.

I think you've touched on a big part of it.

Wrist shots are all about weight transfer. The greater the weight transfer from (backward to forward) the more velociy & height you can achieve; in which case right now, you have limited weight transfer so the quality of your wristers are also limited appropriately.


It's funny now that you got me thinking of it. The basis of a great shot is not how savvy you are with your hands, but firstly how savvy you are on your skates.

blueberrydanish 03-13-2011 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Noir (Post 31639611)
It's funny now that you got me thinking of it. The basis of a great shot is not how savvy you are with your hands, but firstly how savvy you are on your skates.

and knowing is half the battle! G IIIIIII JOEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!

Anubis79 03-13-2011 03:08 PM

It might be helpful to think of the wrist shot as a push-pull motion. Your bottom hand becomes the pivot point. You push down and through the puck with your bottom hand. As you approach the release point of the shot you pull back with your top hand while still pushing through with your bottom hand and rotating through with your wrists. This will add extra velocity and energy to your shot.

BlackNYellow 03-13-2011 04:16 PM

@HowToHockey - You have some great tips and pointers both on your site and on here (your hockey stop videos, well, helped me learn the hockey stop :P)

@Noir - Again thank you much kind person (don't want to insult by saying sir or ma'am as I do not know, heh) your tips and pointers are greatly appreciated!

@blueberrydanish - That it is...knowing is half the battle! (:

@Anubis79 - That is a good way of thinking about it, but in that perspective when looking at it as you had explained, a push/pull motion. Should my top hand then be out a little ways from my body?

trtaylor 03-13-2011 04:22 PM

The videos posted above are all good ones. Here's another one that you may find helpful.


BlackNYellow 03-13-2011 05:40 PM

@trtaylor - Another great video and tips :D

Anubis79 03-13-2011 09:26 PM

Yes, you definitely want your hands away from your body, but not way out. If you're too close you lose your range of motion along with the lever and fulcrum setup you want. I'm not an expert and I in no way have a pro shot, but I can shoot with decent accuracy and velocity. Pulling with the top hand was one of the things I read for getting a better shot. People with more experience can correct me if I'm wrong though.

BlackNYellow 03-14-2011 08:38 AM

@Anubis79 - Cool deal, I will keep that in mind :D

kingscourt26 03-14-2011 06:33 PM

I'll be first to admit my slap shot is garbage so I spent a lot of time working on my wrist shot and snap shot.

To start working on your wrist shot, the HowToHockey vid posted above is spot on. I want to stress 2 things that were said. First, start practicing with the puck about a foot behind your back leg and have your stick behind the puck angled over it. This will get you used to the motion you need to propel the shot. Think of it like pulling back on a bow and arrow. The next important part was keeping your bottom hand higher on the stick. This will allow for the fulcrum to be better placed and give you some nice torque.

After you get the feel for the shot, it will naturally start getting better and better. Keep your head up and keep your eyes where you want the puck to go.

ponder 03-15-2011 02:06 AM

The 2nd and 3rd videos at the bottom of this page should give you some more slow-mo looks at ideal weight transfer, lift without having to scoop the puck, wrist roll/snap at the end, etc. Obviously none of us are ever going to shoot as well as an ex-NHLer like Iafrate, and as a beginner it will certainly be a LONG time and a LOT of practice before you even come close, but I think it can help to see the slow-mo in terms of what you should be shooting for.

http://www.basehockey.ca/fit_van.htm

biturbo19 03-15-2011 06:30 AM

i don't have a whole lot to contribute here...

but i'd say something that might help (or might not at all) is to think about it as drawing a bit of an 'S' beside you with the puck. but i shoot right...if you shoot left, it's the opposite basically. a curvy 'Z' i guess?

not just sliding the puck around like that, but to use that sort of motion to get loft on the puck.

umwoz 03-15-2011 12:45 PM

I haven't read over all of what's been said in this thread. But underneath all of the fancy tricks/tips, keep in mind....

Close/Open/Close. That's what your blade is doing, you cradle the blade over the puck, as it comes forward you open it slightly and the "snap" of the wrist shot comes from closing your blade, pointing it at the target. Keep your head up, look where you want to shoot.

Fleuryoutside29 03-15-2011 12:53 PM

I had a similar problem when I first started. I had a guy at my local hockey shop who helped me a lot when I was learning to skate and helped me learn to shoot as well. See if you can find someone who knows what they're doing to watch you and see if they can help. Many people are more than willing to help you out because it means more people to play at a higher level and more fun pick up games.

Noir 03-15-2011 04:49 PM

lol, I guess I should have paid more attention to your post and realize that your main goal was "lift." To add what other are saying but putting it as simply as possible is it's just a simultaneous flick of the wrist when you're winding your shot from back to front.

Of course, the faster your weight transfer, so will your flick have to simultaneously be fast. You won't realize it but it'll work by automation that at the end portion of your flick, the puck has also travelled from the heel portion of your blade to your toe.




You just have to be able to combine the 2 actions as smoothly as possible which takes time to get smooth: Bringing the puck from back to front & flicking your wrist.


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