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-   -   Imbalanced skating? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=903011)

RAYClovis 04-13-2011 12:14 AM

Imbalanced skating?
 
Just noticed a few things over the last few days of skating. I'm not exactly how should I treat this. It's clear that I'm right footed as I drive the best with my right foot, especially for the P cuts. However when it comes to stop, I can't do the right-foot snowplow stop as consistently as the other side. Whenever I do snowplow on the left, it's easy and natural for me and don't give me issue. On the right side I don't have problem shifting my weight on my left as it's my balance leg, but I can't keep my right foot stable on the ice and it just jumps and bounces. Sometimes it feels like it's harder to turn the foot and keep it locked. Similar issues with one-legged sculls, as I don't have issues balancing on the right but can't keep my left skate smooth on the ice.

If it matters, when I ski I often stop with left foot downhill and my right foot pronates more than my left. Is this more of something that I can try and overcome with practices?

ponder 04-13-2011 01:10 AM

Don't worry, pretty much every person who has ever skated has a strong side and a weak side. For me everything I did with my right leg on the outside (i.e. turns to the left, stopping facing left, etc.) has always felt more easy/natural than the opposite direction, but you develop your weak side with practice. The jittery feeling stopping on your weak edge is totally normal, it's just you not getting the pressure applied to the ice properly, it goes away with practice too. Maybe you have over-pronation issues, but what you are describing are common problems for all new skaters.

Gino 14 04-13-2011 05:44 AM

Power skating lessons

beth 04-13-2011 10:25 AM

I still have problems with one side - I'm finally at the point where I can stop on the weak side in practice, but it is nowhere near natural for games yet. Things that are helping me (slowly but surely) are drills on one foot - one foot glides forwards/backwards, one foot inside edges, one foot outside edges. It seems to be forcing me to get the balance on that weak leg figured out. One foot stops, especially, (both inside and outside edge) are really helping me with the weak side stopping and just getting both feet equally involved in the stop in general. They're really hard, though! I've fallen on my ass quite a lot practicing those!

If you think something about the skate blade on that foot might be messing with you, you can check the level of the edges with a straightedge. But it's probably just that you need practice. :)

noobman 04-13-2011 03:56 PM

Everytime you see an NHL defenseman turn the wrong way while covering a forward (turning his back to him) know that the player just habitually went to his strong side.

Everyone has a strong side and a weak side. The idea is to work on your weak side until it's comparable to your strong side. It's definitely just a matter of practicing.

jacklours 04-13-2011 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noobman (Post 32339607)
Everytime you see an NHL defenseman turn the wrong way while covering a forward (turning his back to him) know that the player just habitually went to his strong side..

That baffles my mind, I learned that playing Novice turn on both sides, brake on both sides etc.

I'm just an average beer-league player and I don't EVER EVER turn my back on a rushing forward. Yet these guys are NHL defenders and I see it done everyonce in a while.

Back to the OP, if you practice you shouldn't feel a difference eventually wether you do things left or right. I don't anymore, my body just reacts to the play, I don't have a strong side or week side.

nukethewhales 04-13-2011 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jacklours (Post 32339908)
I'm just an average beer-league player and I don't EVER EVER turn my back on a rushing forward. Yet these guys are NHL defenders and I see it done everyonce in a while.

Maybe if you did, you would be an NHL defenceman?

Gino 14 04-13-2011 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noobman (Post 32339607)
Everytime you see an NHL defenseman turn the wrong way while covering a forward (turning his back to him) know that the player just habitually went to his strong side.

Those guys don't have a wrong side, that's why they made it to the NHL. They can turn and skate all day long and you'll never see a weakness or a "strong" side.

TheOtter 04-13-2011 07:42 PM

NHL defensemen often turn their back on the rushing forward because they're taking the opportunity to scan the middle of the ice while they turn, to see what other threats are coming down the ice. I've actually seen that in a book or article somewhere, saying that's the way you should do it...

ponder 04-14-2011 07:52 PM

I'm in noobman's camp on this one, I've definitely seen NHL defenders get beaten cause they turned the wrong way. We're talking one on one situations where the forward is beating them wide, so they turn to skate forward, but instead of turning towards the forward so they can properly stay with him and angle him off they turn the opposite direction, which basically gives the forward a breakaway. You don't see it often, but it does happen even for NHL dmen, and it is them turning to their weaker side. I remember seeing this in a game quite recently where the commentator even pointed it out, saying that the defender screwed up by turning away from the forward, to his strong/natural side, instead of turning into the forward as he should have.

Obviously all NHLers are very strong on both sides/all 4 edges, but they'll still have one side that is stronger/more natural. In the spur of the moment, especially if they're somewhat off balanced/out of the comfort zone, you'll see them sometimes fall back on what's most natural and turn to the wrong side.

noobman 04-14-2011 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 32345685)
Those guys don't have a wrong side, that's why they made it to the NHL. They can turn and skate all day long and you'll never see a weakness or a "strong" side.

It's rare, but it happens. Watch more hockey!

Obviously you're not going to see Niklas Lidstrom making a mistake like that, but don't be surprised to see a mistake like that out of a fringe NHL defenseman. I saw a guy do it last week in a replay, but I can't remember his name. I *think* it was a TB guy.

nullterm 04-14-2011 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noobman (Post 32380705)
It's rare, but it happens. Watch more hockey!

Obviously you're not going to see Niklas Lidstrom making a mistake like that, but don't be surprised to see a mistake like that out of a fringe NHL defenseman. I saw a guy do it last week in a replay, but I can't remember his name. I *think* it was a TB guy.

Yeap. NHL guys are amazing skaters. But remember the guys they face are also amazing skaters. When you're under that much pressure to keep up with a guy that is just as good, if not better, any bad habits or weaknesses you have may come out.

TheOtter 04-15-2011 11:09 AM

That's all true - I'm just saying that just because an NHLer turned away from the puck carrier doesn't necessarily mean he did it because that's his strong side. Sometimes it's to survey the ice or to take a different angle.


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