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PlayersCoach 07-12-2011 11:47 AM

Your sports mindset
 
I'm doing a bit of an experiment. If you wouldn't mind helping me out, I'd like you to fill in the following questionnaire.

Please answer the questionnaire as if you are trying out for a sports team that you really want to make, and the coach has given this survey to you. He plans to use your answers as part of the evaluation process.

---

Consider the statement "I feel most successful in sport when…" and read each of the following statements listed below and indicate how much you personally agree with each statement by entering an appropriate score where:

1 = strongly disagree
2 = disagree
3 = neutral
4 = agree
5 = strongly agree

I feel most successful in sport when...

I am the only one who can do the play or skill

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more

I can do better than my friends

The others cannot do as well as me

I learn something that is fun to do

Others mess up "and" I do not

I learn a new skill by trying hard

I work really hard

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc.

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more

I am the best

A skill I learn really feels right

I do my very best


If you're curious about your score, you can do the test online at:

http://www.pponline.co.uk/101Evaluat...stionnaire.htm

But I am really interested in your responses to the individual questions.

Thanks for helping me out!

AIREAYE 07-12-2011 11:57 AM

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PlayersCoach 07-12-2011 12:09 PM

Awesome. Thanks a lot for responding.

Ozz 07-12-2011 12:25 PM

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SERE 24 07-12-2011 12:34 PM

My answers will probably deviate from the norm a bit, and don't get me wrong, I'm a team player (wore a C in high school and A in college) who loves to win and will gladly sacrifice personal accolades for team success, but I also WANT to dominate and am driven to want to be the best person on the ice, on either side. I was coached to want the puck on my stick, to want be the best and that doesn't mean not being humble about it, but there's no question that hockey players perform better when they play with confidence and a little swagger in their game. Extended goal droughts often result from a dip in confidence after a shorter unlucky stretch and many prospects who are "rushed" and end up not panning out bust because they lost the confidence they'd had, dominated at every level before the NHL, when they were thrown into the bigs too early and weren't able to perform at the same level.

That said:

I am the only one who can do the play or skill 3

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more 4

I can do better than my friends 3

The others cannot do as well as me 5

I learn something that is fun to do 3

Others mess up "and" I do not 5

I learn a new skill by trying hard 5

I work really hard 3

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc. 5

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more 4

I am the best 5

A skill I learn really feels right 5

I do my very best 3

(only because doing your very best/working hard and getting blown out doesn't feel very successful and the question was "I feel most successful when..." I always try my best and work my tail off, but it doesn't always make me feel successful; success and results make me feel successful)

Jarick 07-12-2011 12:38 PM

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Ego = 3.33
Task = 4


In practices, if I'm doing way better than everyone else, I get annoyed because I'm at too low of a level. I don't see that as success, I see that as a waste of time. I had a 12-week clinic where most people were under my skill level and it was a little frustrating. But I didn't see myself as being successful because of it.

Same thing when playing drop-in or practices with lower level guys, I don't feel any success ripping it up against beginners.

For me, success comes with playing well and improving as a player. Often this is improving a skill, getting better fitness, or becoming more well rounded on the ice. For instance, I've always been a great shooter, poor passer, and mediocre skater. This summer I wanted to improve my skating and passing, and that would be success in my opinion.

I also feel successful if I contributed to my team winning. If my team wins 8-0 and I get no points, I get frustrated (I am a scorer and that's my job). I take a little pride in back checking or having a good +/- or shutting down the other team, but I do like to see my name on the score sheet. So I have some ego there.

PlayersCoach 07-12-2011 01:30 PM

Thanks a lot for responding, guys.

The insights are great as well.

Nizdizzle 07-12-2011 02:21 PM

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Sigge 07-13-2011 03:00 AM

I am the only one who can do the play or skill - 1

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more - 4

I can do better than my friends - 4

The others cannot do as well as me - 1

I learn something that is fun to do - 5

Others mess up "and" I do not - 3

I learn a new skill by trying hard - 4

I work really hard - 5

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc. - 5

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more - 5

I am the best - 4

A skill I learn really feels right - 5

I do my very best - 5


Nice thread!
Just thought I'd explain a few of my answers as well.
If I'm the only one who can do a certain thing, not messing up etc most likely means I'm playing with people worse than me which means I probably won't even feel all that proud about excelling at whatever I do either.

However when playing at people my level, perhaps even a bit better then yes, I would feel good about not messing up, I would feel good about doing the best job in whatever position I'm playing etc.

I won't really feel all that competetive nor motivated unless I play with people at least my level or even better a bit above me!

PlayersCoach 07-13-2011 03:47 PM

Thanks again for all the great responses.

One thing I'm curious about...

Do you think your answers to these questions would changed based on who was giving this test? Like, for example, say someone was just giving it to you out of curiosity, versus if a coach was giving it to you and he planned to somehow use your responses to determine whether you should make the team or not...

Any thoughts on that?

noobman 07-13-2011 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PlayersCoach (Post 34943117)
I'm doing a bit of an experiment. If you wouldn't mind helping me out, I'd like you to fill in the following questionnaire.

Please answer the questionnaire as if you are trying out for a sports team that you really want to make, and the coach has given this survey to you. He plans to use your answers as part of the evaluation process.

---

Consider the statement "I feel most successful in sport when…" and read each of the following statements listed below and indicate how much you personally agree with each statement by entering an appropriate score where:

1 = strongly disagree
2 = disagree
3 = neutral
4 = agree
5 = strongly agree

I feel most successful in sport when...

I am the only one who can do the play or skill

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more

I can do better than my friends

The others cannot do as well as me

I learn something that is fun to do

Others mess up "and" I do not

I learn a new skill by trying hard

I work really hard

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc.

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more

I am the best

A skill I learn really feels right

I do my very best


If you're curious about your score, you can do the test online at:

http://www.pponline.co.uk/101Evaluat...stionnaire.htm
!

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Ego orientation is 2.83, while task orientation is 4.43

GoTeamDom 07-13-2011 04:47 PM

I don't really see ego as a bad thing, in fact I wish I were less level headed in sport. There's the extra gear that I hit every once in a while and I stuggle to figure out what I can do to trigger it.

I got 3.1 ego 4.2 in task

SERE 24 07-13-2011 05:02 PM

My ego score was like 4.3, but I agree, I think players need ego to perform at a high level. Having an ego doesn't mean you're a jerk; you can keep your ego in check and maintain a humble outward demeanor, but you need to have a confidence and swagger to perform at your best, especially when you're playing at a higher level.

For example, if I were playing in a men's league level C game and I could perform a skill that no one else could or had the most goals/assists/points it wouldn't feel special and I would probably actually look to shoot a lot less, focus on defense to just help my team win, and look to setup other guys and just make outlet passes. If I was playing on my college team, however, and we were in practice and I was the only one properly performing a drill or demonstrating a skill, on the ice with a bunch of other college hockey players, I would feel very successful and take pride in being the best. I think THAT feeling would also help me to perform at a higher level in a game for that college team, because my confidence would be very high. Hockey is a game where you're not going to be as successful as you're capable of being if you're doubting yourself.

Reverend Mayhem 07-13-2011 05:20 PM

I am the only one who can do the play or skill - (2)

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more - (4)

I can do better than my friends - (3)

The others cannot do as well as me - (3)

I learn something that is fun to do - (5)

Others mess up "and" I do not - (4)

I learn a new skill by trying hard - (5)

I work really hard - (5)

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc. - (3)

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more - (3)

I am the best - (3)

A skill I learn really feels right - (5)

I do my very best - (5)

Ego: 3
Task: 4.57

Razzmatazz 07-13-2011 09:49 PM

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3 Ego, 5 Task

JKG33 07-14-2011 12:45 AM

I am a goalie, so this may be a bit different from the rest of you, as there are usually only 2-4 goalies on depending on the type of ice-time (game, practice, training camp).

I am the only one who can do the play or skill - 4

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more - 4

I can do better than my friends - 3

The others cannot do as well as me - 5

I learn something that is fun to do - 5

Others mess up "and" I do not - 4

I learn a new skill by trying hard - 5

I work really hard - 5

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc. - 5

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more - 3

I am the best - 5

A skill I learn really feels right - 5

I do my very best - 5

Ego Oriented: 4.334
Task Oriented: 4.571

TrueBostonian 07-20-2011 07:04 AM

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Ego- 2.16
Task Oriented- 4.57

With a lot of the individual based questions, I answered with agree/strongly agree, due to the fact that no matter who the player is, if they perform a drill or execute a play well and their team doesn't, it's important for them to step up and help those who didn't perform so well. This is important for the younger players especially, since it teaches them various skills on this aspect (leadership, people skills, etc).

Hope this helps.

TrueBostonian 07-20-2011 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PlayersCoach (Post 34991161)
Thanks again for all the great responses.

One thing I'm curious about...

Do you think your answers to these questions would changed based on who was giving this test? Like, for example, say someone was just giving it to you out of curiosity, versus if a coach was giving it to you and he planned to somehow use your responses to determine whether you should make the team or not...

Any thoughts on that?

It probably would, but it woudn't be for the players benefit. If they were to answer the questions in a "false" manner, so in other words, came up with what thought to be the best answer, it wouldn't translate on the ice. They may have an ego on the ice.

One thing you should consider though, is that if you have a player answer questions and they aren't what you're looking for, but are good on the ice, it doesn't mean you can't work with them to make them a better player, both on and off the ice.

Subnordi 07-20-2011 06:23 PM

I am the only one who can do the play or skill 1

I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more 5

I can do better than my friends 3

The others cannot do as well as me 3

I learn something that is fun to do 5

Others mess up "and" I do not 1

I learn a new skill by trying hard 5

I work really hard 5

I score the most points/goals/hits, etc. 3

Something I learn makes me want to go practice more 5

I am the best 1

A skill I learn really feels right 5

I do my very best 5

Sharpshooter101 07-23-2011 11:46 AM

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I scored 2 on polishing my ego and 4.14 on focusing at the task.

Now, I disagree with the idea that ego is important in the way the people above put it. and I will actually give you a short lesson - I suggest you to read because you finally find a philosophy lesson which has real, human, and practical applications!

Existentialism is the philosophy of existence. It's subjective and that means things revolve around the thinker. However, you have to understand what it means: it doesn't mean that you re-invent reality or that the world is as you conceive - an existentialist will not say that beauty lies in the eyes of beholder; he would rather say that beauty is understood inwardly. To grasp this idea, you need to reset your linking arrow between thinker and objects: instead of asking "what" and existentialist bothers about "how": it's how do you relate to a given thing and not so much what to which you relate. My disagreement here is based unto an idea Kierkegaard proposed. He said: "Whether I can grasp God objectively, I do not believe, but precisely because I cannot know, I must believe." Now, go beyond the religious influence here and understand the reasoning behind it because he doesn't try to prove or justify his beliefs: it's not about the what, it's about the how. He says that in spite of knowledge and in awareness of the lack thereof, one has no other choice but to believe.

The point he makes disagrees with your statement about ego. What he says is that you must commit in awareness of not knowing, not that you must be convinced of knowing - the commitment is to choose a path without knowing because you cannot do otherwise.
___________________
The conclusion is that you must commit yourself to a path without knowing where it will lead and, if you ever read Nietzsche or Kierkegaard, you will soon understand they suggest you to do so out passion, out of Will.

Now, the hundred bucks question: what's useful in this?
1-The first one is that it reconciles you with your choices. Now, when you doubt a choice, you can stop putting energy at clearing this doubt: just accept your doubt and rather put energy at figuring how you relate to the options and choose the one which you want to associate yourself with.
2-The second thing is that now, you find a way to live as an individual without forgetting other people around you.
3-The third thing is that arguing with someone will no longer be a contest of who is right, no more than a pointless discussion of two people always agreeing; it will be an exchange of ideas from which you can grow.
4-The fourth one is that you no longer have to stick to rules someone told you... whether you hold religious, cultural or secular beliefs about morality, you can always decide to change your mind.

But, my favorite one: passion and reason are united - be that self you truly are, as Nietzsche said; be someone, make that someone, live as that someone!

LA Kings Hockey 07-23-2011 05:47 PM

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SkateThroughIt 07-31-2011 04:13 AM

I feel most successful in sport when...

2 - I am the only one who can do the play or skill

5 - I learn a new skill and it makes me want to practice more

4 - I can do better than my friends

3 - The others cannot do as well as me

3 - I learn something that is fun to do

4 - Others mess up "and" I do not

5 - I learn a new skill by trying hard

5 - I work really hard

4 - I score the most points/goals/hits, etc.

5 - Something I learn makes me want to go practice more

4 - I am the best

5 - A skill I learn really feels right

1 (I feel the most successful when I do my worst and its still above average) - I do my very best

ColeJ 08-02-2011 05:02 AM

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SJGoalie32 08-05-2011 01:51 PM

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Ego = 3.83
Task = 4.57

I'm a goaltender.

Since I'm the only one on the ice the entire game, I kinda have to believe that I'm not only the best player on the team, but the best player on both teams. My ultimate goal is to post a shutout every single time I step on the ice.....no matter how well or poorly my teammates play in front of me, and no matter how tough or weak the competition is.

I like a good challenge, but I am driven to excel at everything I do and overcome that challenge. I'm a good teammate but I'm also highly competitive. I want to be the best at everything I do, but not just because everyone around me is weak. I want my teammates to be as good as they can be as well, but I also want to be even better, and I want to work hard to be better.

I want my team to be the best. I am very willing to sacrifice my own personal glory for the good of the team (because my primary focus is team success), but as a goaltender, my team doesn't win or at least has a lower chance of winning if I'm not the best at what I do. If I don't believe I give my team the best chance to win every time I step on the ice, then I really don't belong on the ice or in the crease.

One of the issues I have had in the past is on teams where I was not clearly the #1 goaltender or where our roles were not clearly defined. I've played on teams where I was clearly the best goalie. I've played on teams where the other goalie had comparable or better skill, but our roles were clearly defined (set schedule of starts, alternating games, etc.). But my worst performance usually comes when I'm competing with my own teammate for the starting position. It's fine to compete in practice, but once the game starts it was tough for me to shake the feeling like if I give up a few goals, even if the defense in front of me was atrocious, that I might not see ice time again for a month. When I know my team has my back and is willing to give me the benefit of the doubt (whether because I'm the only goalie, clearly the best goalie, or because it's my turn in the rotation), I play loose and usually do well. When I give up one softie or two goals back-to-back, and suddenly I find myself as worried about what I look like to my coach or team if I give up another goal as I am about the opposing guy with the puck in a 3-on-2 rush.....I tend to do worse.

PatriceBergeronFan 08-06-2011 06:08 PM

I am very, very competitive, I'll be the first to admit it. I am also a good team player and have been captain of multiple teams growing up; I just keep the selfish aspects to myself to not affect anyone else.

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E. O. 4.6666
T. O. 4.4286

Yeah, each of my friends would agree with that. I like to win, but I like it best when the team wins (sports).


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