HFBoards

HFBoards (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/index.php)
-   The Rink (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/forumdisplay.php?f=150)
-   -   Need info on lactic acid and compression garments (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=952961)

night-timer 07-18-2011 06:12 AM

Need info on lactic acid and compression garments
 
I am looking for info and explanations on:

1. Lactic acid (what it is, how it occurs, how to prevent it, etc), and

2. Compression clothing (what it does, how it improves performance, etc).

... all comments appreciated.... thanks!

CGNY87 07-18-2011 06:15 AM

I dont really have an answer to any of those. However, I use compression pants for hockey just because it is tight and doesn't bunch up under the pads. That is the sole reason I purchased them. I personally haven't seen any performance improvements after switching to compression pants.

McDugan 07-18-2011 09:04 AM

OK, so my ******* links won't post properly due the the board's filter, and I'm not going to go back to Let Me Google That For You all over again, but really...

Google "lactic acid" and "compression clothing benefits" and spend 10 minutes reading.

Nbr-17 07-18-2011 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by night-timer (Post 35131201)
1. Lactic acid (what it is, how it occurs, how to prevent it, etc), and

Having quite some experience in endurance sport I can comment on that.
The key in any type of effort is the amount of oxygen in your blood.
Oxygen is carried in red blood cells and is supplied through breathing.
The harder the effort the higher your heart rate and therefore the more oxygen your body/blood needs.
Up to a certain level of effort the oxygen supplied through breathing is sufficient.
Beyond that your body will 'create' it's own oxygen, this results in lactic acid which cannot be sustained for a longer period of time.
The level of effort that can be sustained through breathing is called 'aerobic' while one where breathing is not sufficient is called 'anaerobic'.
The point/heart rate when your body switches for aerobic to anaerobic is called your 'anaerobic threshold' and is different from person to person. Training will increase your anaerobic threshold.
Endurance sports are typical aerobic and sprints anaerobic.
Hockey is an anaerobic sport, so you will build up lactic acid every shift. Key is to be able to flush out that lactic acid and recover between shifts.
I hope that all makes sense.

Giroux tha Damaja 07-18-2011 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nbr-17 (Post 35136153)
Having quite some experience in endurance sport I can comment on that.
The key in any type of effort is the amount of oxygen in your blood.
Oxygen is carried in red blood cells and is supplied through breathing.
The harder the effort the higher your heart rate and therefore the more oxygen your body/blood needs.
Up to a certain level of effort the oxygen supplied through breathing is sufficient.
Beyond that your body will 'create' it's own oxygen, this results in lactic acid which cannot be sustained for a longer period of time.
The level of effort that can be sustained through breathing is called 'aerobic' while one where breathing is not sufficient is called 'anaerobic'.
The point/heart rate when your body switches for aerobic to anaerobic is called your 'anaerobic threshold' and is different from person to person. Training will increase your anaerobic threshold.
Endurance sports are typical aerobic and sprints anaerobic.
Hockey is an anaerobic sport, so you will build up lactic acid every shift. Key is to be able to flush out that lactic acid and recover between shifts.
I hope that all makes sense.

All pretty accurate except for this. Your body can't create it's own oxygen. Your muscles burn a compound called ATP for energy. Your body has two chemical processes that allow it to do this.

The first process requires oxygen, doesn't produce any acidic byproducts (only carbon dioxide or CO2) and is far more efficient at generating energy for your body to use than the second. This is what a lot of the oxygen you're inhaling goes to. The air replenishes the oxygen your body needs to drive the process (i.e. it is where the two O's in that CO2 is coming from).

The second uses sugar (not table sugar but I forget the specific form of glucose) and some other compounds in the body to create ATP, but it is far less efficient than the use of the oxygen driven production of ATP, and produces lactic acid. When your muscles start to catch fire during hard work, you're feeling the build-up of lactic acid in the tissue because it is being generated at a rate greater than the tissue can oxidize it (oxidizing lactic acid turns it into another compound called pyruvate, which your body actually uses to fuel the anaerobic energy production process in the first place).

If you're still curious you can look up the "Kreb cycle" and just google aerobic versus anaerobic exercise, but these aren't critical to getting the general concept. Also, when I say your body "oxidizes" the lactic acid, that is not to say it bonds it with oxygen. Oxidation and reduction are kinds of reactions in chemistry where molecules or atoms gain or lose electrons.

Here is a nice link to a flash animation that out lines the differences in aerobic and anaerobic cellular production of ATP if you're that interested. http://www.svcc.edu/InfoMenu/departm...p/tenstep.html

trukweaz 07-18-2011 02:32 PM

RIGHT! Giroux has some great points.

For ease of searching and education, I would propose the OP search "blood lactate" and not lactic acid. lactic acid is a bit of a misnomer. understand that certain organs (heart!) can actually use lactate to produce ATP.

And to the OP, NO there has not been a good/double blind/controlled study that shows compression gear helps with athletic performance. It helps with veinous return and thus MAYBE recovery.



Quote:

Originally Posted by Giroux tha Damaja (Post 35136833)
All pretty accurate except for this. Your body can't create it's own oxygen. Your muscles burn a compound called ATP for energy. Your body has two chemical processes that allow it to do this.

The first process requires oxygen, doesn't produce any acidic byproducts (only carbon dioxide or CO2) and is far more efficient at generating energy for your body to use than the second. This is what a lot of the oxygen you're inhaling goes to. The air replenishes the oxygen your body needs to drive the process (i.e. it is where the two O's in that CO2 is coming from).

The second uses sugar (not table sugar but I forget the specific form of glucose) and some other compounds in the body to create ATP, but it is far less efficient than the use of the oxygen driven production of ATP, and produces lactic acid. When your muscles start to catch fire during hard work, you're feeling the build-up of lactic acid in the tissue because it is being generated at a rate greater than the tissue can oxidize it (oxidizing lactic acid turns it into another compound called pyruvate, which your body actually uses to fuel the anaerobic energy production process in the first place).

If you're still curious you can look up the "Kreb cycle" and just google aerobic versus anaerobic exercise, but these aren't critical to getting the general concept. Also, when I say your body "oxidizes" the lactic acid, that is not to say it bonds it with oxygen. Oxidation and reduction are kinds of reactions in chemistry where molecules or atoms gain or lose electrons.

Here is a nice link to a flash animation that out lines the differences in aerobic and anaerobic cellular production of ATP if you're that interested. http://www.svcc.edu/InfoMenu/departm...p/tenstep.html


Jarick 07-19-2011 10:57 AM

From what I understand, the two things to really help are to:

1. practice hard enough to push through the lactic acid burn, which helps during game situations to go that extra mile

2. stretch the muscles after working out or playing so that you can help clear the lactic acid (and it feels good)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:54 AM.

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com, A property of CraveOnline, a division of AtomicOnline LLC ©2009 CraveOnline Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.