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-   -   Getting new skates - recommendations please! (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=966497)

Rem 08-10-2011 02:01 PM

Getting new skates - recommendations please!
 
Hello rink rats,

the time has come for me to part ways with my Reebok 6k's I bought 6 years ago when I started playing. They are absolutely worn out. So I need to look into a new pair. My budget is about $400. I'm only 5'8", so I heavily rely on having quick feet and explosiveness. I love to play the puck down low in the O zone so maneuverability is important. I also, when playing wing mostly, get break aways because of my speed so forward speed is a must as well (sidenote: I'm not a cherry picker by any means. I've learned to anticipate the transition well and break past the D).

My vitals:

5'8"
175lbs
Mid-width feet - low, but definitive arch.
Play 2-3 games a week, and a free skate every so often
I'm intermediate


I've been looking into the Bauer One80's because i've heard some great things about them (Bauers). But I've never had another skate on that wasn't a rental or my 6k's.

Thanks for your help! :yo:

Edit: Added more vitals.

Jarick 08-10-2011 02:37 PM

You should be able to get a real nice skate for $400. But you'll need to get fitted. Guessing on the skate is the equivalent of flushing money down the toilet.

Look for a shop that can not only look at your foot width, but instep depth and heel pronouncement. Make sure they offer free baking, punching, stretching, and initial profiling and sharpening.

Rem 08-10-2011 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 35818957)
You should be able to get a real nice skate for $400. But you'll need to get fitted. Guessing on the skate is the equivalent of flushing money down the toilet.

Look for a shop that can not only look at your foot width, but instep depth and heel pronouncement. Make sure they offer free baking, punching, stretching, and initial profiling and sharpening.

Oh yeah. for sure. I wouldn't just go buy a skate online without trying it on. There's a great LHS up in Oakland (30 min from San Jose) that has a large selection and great staff.

AIREAYE 08-10-2011 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rapid eye movemenT (Post 35819405)
Oh yeah. for sure. I wouldn't just go buy a skate online without trying it on. There's a great LHS up in Oakland (30 min from San Jose) that has a large selection and great staff.

I hope you'll be buying from them then, if they took the time to fit you properly :)

Mr Fahrenheit 08-10-2011 04:20 PM

You should of gone to the sharks team sale last month. Personally I think Bauer makes the best skates but there are plenty of variables

Rem 08-10-2011 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 35821859)
I hope you'll be buying from them then, if they took the time to fit you properly :)

Oh yeah, I would. They match prices anyway, but I'm all about supporting the LHS so long as they actually give good service. Some here are just pathetic.

Kritter471 08-10-2011 04:57 PM

I agree that if you're going to get a place to fit you, you owe it to that place to consider buying their skates before you go straight home and buy something online.

But if your foot shape fits RBKs, you might have issues going to a different brand (or at least, you might have to jump up in width). I wear RBKs because I have a relatively wide front foot, and they're the only brand of skates that really fit me right. Bauers and CCMs in particular were way, way too narrow in the front.

Devil Dancer 08-10-2011 04:59 PM

I have a low arch, and I've always been more comfortable in Eastons than Bauers. I wear Easton SE10s, and I like them a lot. No pain, no problems.

Jarick 08-10-2011 05:48 PM

I still don't really understand the arch thing. They told me I had flatter feet but I think I have a little arch. The only time I've had arch pain was when my skate was too narrow and my foot would cramp instead of flatten out.

My personal opinion is that heel lock is the most important factor in choosing skates, followed by instep depth and then width. Without heel lock, the best fitting skates in the world will still allow your feet to move within them, making your edges imprecise and robbing you of power. Depth is important because it keeps your foot in place and prevents lace bite and other pains. Width obviously is a comfort thing but you can always stretch or punch a narrow skate.

fuzzerson 08-11-2011 09:05 PM

I just got a pair of U+CL's a month or so ago. Break in period (after baking and stretching) was almost nill. Solid boot, realitively light. A little out of your price range at 599. The U+12 is almost identical and about 400

Rem 08-29-2011 04:04 PM

I went to my LHS (well, local as in Oakland from San Jose), and after a few hours of trying on just about every skate they had, I went with the Graf Ultra G35's @ $599. More than I wanted to spend, but no boot felt as great as this one did. If I weren't with an associate who was as thorough as he was, I would have settled for a cheaper pair but he did his job well and found the one that fit MY FOOT.

Bravo Graf. I wanted to never wear your boot because of superficial reasons, and now I couldn't be happier.

Jarick 08-29-2011 04:41 PM

Did you get the SIDAS insoles as well?

Excellent choice. I did the same thing...budgeted $400 but splurged on G35's because they were on sale, they gave me a nice trade-in, and I had tax return money. No regrets.

Rem 08-29-2011 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 36290005)
Did you get the SIDAS insoles as well?

Excellent choice. I did the same thing...budgeted $400 but splurged on G35's because they were on sale, they gave me a nice trade-in, and I had tax return money. No regrets.

I'm assuming so! According to the GRAF site there in every boot they manufacture. I did speak a little too soon though. As happy as I am, I have yet to wear them on the ice. I'm doing that tonight! (I just picked them up last night).

Can't wait!

Jarick, How long did you break in period take? How do you feel about it now?

Rem 08-29-2011 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 35825249)
My personal opinion is that heel lock is the most important factor in choosing skates, followed by instep depth and then width. Without heel lock, the best fitting skates in the world will still allow your feet to move within them, making your edges imprecise and robbing you of power. Depth is important because it keeps your foot in place and prevents lace bite and other pains. Width obviously is a comfort thing but you can always stretch or punch a narrow skate.

THIS!

The G35's were the ONLY boot to lock my heel in without compromising anything else. It just fits like ... a glove. :naughty:

Skraut 08-29-2011 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rapid eye movemenT (Post 36290479)
I'm assuming so! According to the GRAF site there in every boot they manufacture. I did speak a little too soon though. As happy as I am, I have yet to wear them on the ice. I'm doing that tonight! (I just picked them up last night).

Can't wait!

Jarick, How long did you break in period take? How do you feel about it now?

The SIDAS insoles are something they custom mold to the shape of your foot. You stand on the footbeds on a machine which inflates and shapes the footbeds.

The (not so local) hockey shop I got my G35's at had the SIDAS molding for $20 with the purchase of any of the Graf Ultras. Any other Graf skates it was $120 because you actually had to buy the SIDAS footbeds as well.

Example of the SIDAS fitting from SharksTV
http://video.sharks.nhl.com/videocen...nsole?id=62417

flyers10 08-29-2011 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rapid eye movemenT (Post 36290479)
I'm assuming so! According to the GRAF site there in every boot they manufacture. I did speak a little too soon though. As happy as I am, I have yet to wear them on the ice. I'm doing that tonight! (I just picked them up last night).

Can't wait!

Jarick, How long did you break in period take? How do you feel about it now?

You most like got standard Graf insoles. The custom molded ones are only available at select shops that buy the machine (which is quite expensive), and it appears from Graf's website that Anaheim is only CA city that has it. Don't worry though, the std. insole is nice and you can always try Superfeet. I have the Sidas customs that cost me $100 and I prefer my $30 superfeet. It is all personal preference. Enjoy your skates and good job buying ones that fit the best for your foot.

Jarick 08-30-2011 09:50 AM

The SIDAS were free with the skates at my shop. It was something like $400 for 735's and $600 for G35's, but the G35's were on clearance for $500 and they had the $100 insoles free with them. Most importantly, the boot was a lot more comfortable since the liner seemed thicker.

There was no break in period. They baked the skates and the first skate I lasted five minutes due to extreme arch pain. I brought them in and they punched/stretched the forefeet because they were too narrow up front, which didn't allow my foot to flatten out and it was cramping. After that the fit has been perfect.

I'm kind of a believer that modern skates don't "break in" so much as you get used to them. Severe issues like being too narrow won't ever get fixed unless you bake or stretch them. And of course if they don't lock the heel or are too wide, they are useless.

A few months after I bought them I had them profiled to match my Bauers. I had some balance and quick turn issues in the Grafs, catching edges on the toe/heel. The stock Grafs are 11' radius and forward pitch while Bauers are 9' radius and neutral pitch. Once they did that my skating and balance improved quite a bit and between that and the heel lock I've been steadily improving ever since.

I honestly can't compare the SIDAS to regular insoles since they work so dang well. They are thicker and conform to my foot of course. Regular insoles are thinner and are either flat or have an arch or heel lift. The idea is that the bottom of the SIDAS conform perfectly to the boot and the top conform perfectly to the foot, eliminating any negative space. It does work great. Otherwise if you have higher arches aftermarket insoles CAN help, or they can hurt. By the time you do all the guesswork, the SIDAS are worth the $100...although I believe you should have gotten a pair with your skates. Check with your LHS.

Superfeet felt better to me at first because they were thinner and gave me more room at the forefeet...but the heel lifted my foot slightly out of the pocket. I was wearing Vapors so they were obviously a bad choice anyway. Kind of a wash. If you have no problems stick with what you've got and don't create any.

Rem 08-30-2011 01:01 PM

Thanks for all the replies guys, especially about the SIDAS.

I took them out for the first test skate last night, and they felt great. I did after a period of time get a little bit of pain on the outside of my foot (pinky toe). Nothing severe, but noticeable. I also felt the edge of the tongue being pushed right in between my pinky toe and the ... next toe over (ring toe? yuck!).

It took a little time getting used to the larger radius and forward stance. I absolutely wasn't able to shuffle to my heels at all (just casually). I wonder if this will affect mobility when I'm im relying solely on moving with my heels (in close, legs wide). The forward stance also affected my tight cross overs. It seemed to slip a few times, almost as if I was putting TOO much pressure pressing off the toe. I suppose I had to in my old RBK's, but in the Grafs it almost did it for me. Can someone who has the Grafs (without the custom rocker) elaborate on why the forward stance is much more beneficial?

All in all, I was zooming through the rink. I still had my speed, but there were a few times that I would stumble. No falls though, so I didn't embarrase myself.

RIP RBK 5K's (2006 - 2011) :( (yes, both tongues have fallen completely out)
http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot...5_722801_n.jpg

Welcome to the world, G35's! :yo:
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot..._5703974_n.jpg

Wilch 08-30-2011 01:09 PM

New skates are such a pleasure to look at, congrats on finding a pair that suits you! They look awesome, especially when you put it right below your old skates.

Rem 08-30-2011 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wilch (Post 36310513)
New skates are such a pleasure to look at, congrats on finding a pair that suits you! They look awesome, especially when you put it right below your old skates.

Thanks! I'm stoked :yo:

Pickup tonight! :handclap:

3 vs 3 Tournament on Thursday :yo:

Hawaii Monday!!! :jump::jump::jump:

Great transition to hockey season :nod:

Guffaw 08-31-2011 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rapid eye movemenT (Post 36288917)
I went to my LHS (well, local as in Oakland from San Jose), and after a few hours of trying on just about every skate they had, I went with the Graf Ultra G35's @ $599. More than I wanted to spend, but no boot felt as great as this one did. If I weren't with an associate who was as thorough as he was, I would have settled for a cheaper pair but he did his job well and found the one that fit MY FOOT.

Bravo Graf. I wanted to never wear your boot because of superficial reasons, and now I couldn't be happier.

Nice choice with the Ultra G35X. Joe Pavelski thinks so too and doesn't get paid to wear them. I have the exact same skate. I chose them for the exact same reasons you did. Nothing felt more comfortable walking around the store or locked my heel in like the G35. 735 is supposed to be the same fit, but they just were not as comfortable.

I have Sidas footbeds, but they aren't the customs. They were thrown in since I spent $599:shakehead

I've had these for 6 months and they were baked twice so here's my experience. Keep in mind that I have a very narrow, bony foot with alot of bumps etc.

1) Heel lock-unbelievable. I have a narrow-pronounced heel and it's like the skate was custom made. Heel has never moved, no blisters, etc. I have trouble getting the skate off actually because the heel is so tight. I've yet to see a heel area shaped like that from any other skate company.

2) Instep depth- perfect for me. I have a high arch and I'm prone to lace bite. Absolutely no issues. My Bauers/Microns in the 90's used to kill the top of my feet.

3) Forefoot/toe cap-Regular width is too wide for me. The first eyelet is pulling over the toe cap from me tightening the skates. Next time I'll try a narrow.

4) Profile- I really like to be on the balls of my feet so I had these custom profiled. 1 degree additional forward pitch and I was told changed from a 9ft. radius to an 11ft. Seems like you guys are saying they come 11 so maybe it's a 13 now. That would explain why no one can catch me in a straight line, but my turning radius is about the width of the rink:)

5) Pain- I've had to have them punched 3X now and likely will again. I have 3 bony protrusions on the inside of my feet in the ankle area that turned into skate bunions and are really painful. I guess it's the downside to a stiff skate and a bony foot.

Overall I love the skate and once those areas are punched again they'll be perfect. I may decrease the radius back to 11 if it is in fact at 13 now.

Just curious. What size sneaker/tennis shoe do you wear and what size are your G35's? I wear a 12 shoe, G35's are 10's.

ponder 08-31-2011 03:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rapid eye movemenT (Post 36310289)
Thanks for all the replies guys, especially about the SIDAS.

I took them out for the first test skate last night, and they felt great. I did after a period of time get a little bit of pain on the outside of my foot (pinky toe). Nothing severe, but noticeable. I also felt the edge of the tongue being pushed right in between my pinky toe and the ... next toe over (ring toe? yuck!).

It took a little time getting used to the larger radius and forward stance. I absolutely wasn't able to shuffle to my heels at all (just casually). I wonder if this will affect mobility when I'm im relying solely on moving with my heels (in close, legs wide). The forward stance also affected my tight cross overs. It seemed to slip a few times, almost as if I was putting TOO much pressure pressing off the toe. I suppose I had to in my old RBK's, but in the Grafs it almost did it for me. Can someone who has the Grafs (without the custom rocker) elaborate on why the forward stance is much more beneficial?

All in all, I was zooming through the rink. I still had my speed, but there were a few times that I would stumble. No falls though, so I didn't embarrase myself.

RIP RBK 5K's (2006 - 2011) :( (yes, both tongues have fallen completely out)
http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot...5_722801_n.jpg

Welcome to the world, G35's! :yo:
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphot..._5703974_n.jpg

Glad you found skates that fit you well! It's going to take quite awhile to adjust to the new steel, because the steel on your Rbk skates was horribly worn down, you can tell your sharpener puts way too much pressure on the toe and heel when sharpening because he's worn them completely off! I'd say if, after a dozen skates or so, you still feel weird with the new steel, to try getting them profiled down to a 9' radius, but obviously don't try to go to that toe/heel-less steel you've been skating on.

Also, as Jarick stated, if your skates came with Sidas footbeds, and the shop has one of those fitting machines, it would be worth your while to get them fitted. Great footbeds make a big difference.

Re: the forward stance, it somewhat helps your acceleration when skating forwards (once you get used to it), though it also makes skating backwards a bit tougher. When skating forwards it puts you in more of that knees bent, athletic stance. I'll bet that it's not actually the forward stance that's giving you trouble during crossovers, but the new blade shape, you'll have grown so accustomed to those worn down blades that new blades, with a proper shape, will seem quite foreign at first.

Jarick 08-31-2011 10:39 AM

When I had them profiled backwards I was playing defense but I'm a better skater both ways at neutral pitch than forward. Once I need new steel with these skates I'm just going to have LS2's put on (tons of Graf guys do this). Of course I only get them sharpened maybe 8-10 times A YEAR so we'll see if the steel outlasts the boot :laugh:

From that pic, your 5k's had a much smaller radius than the stock Grafs. My Grafs looked similar when new. Initially they ground the heel and toe a couple times to add rocker but ended up just going with a 9' radius that fixed the problem. Much tighter turns and fewer caught edges.

santiclaws 08-31-2011 04:40 PM

I just skated in my new G35's for the first time yesterday. Really made a big difference in my skating after wearing my 4-year-old 703's. Gotta love Graf for having so many different models to fit different feet. I had the 703W, but they were a little narrow in the forefoot so had to be punched. They were also a little too shallow, but the narrow heel was perfect. After reading up on their selection, it seemed the the G35 would be just what the doctor ordered for my feet - same narrow heel but a wider forefoot and a bit deeper. Never tried them on, bought regular width G35's on ebay for $300 new and crossed my fingers that I was right. They fit great. No punching will be required and even skating on them for the first time yesterday, I felt lots more control but no pain. Awesome.

Fred89 09-02-2011 08:34 AM

Today i've done a little bit of feet measurements to see if my feet are even: i've found that the right one is a little bit shorter and wider than the left one. Essentially it's 27cm vs 26.8cm of length and 10 vs 10.3cm of width.
Tried the Ratio Method so it gives 2.7 and 2.6 respectively, meaning that one foot is a D and the other one is an E (according to that method).. By the way i think that with some baking i could fit in a D without huge problems.. What do you guys think?
And also, do you guys think that is better to get a skate that locks better the smaller foot, even if i might have problem of pain with the bigger one, or do i have to get a skate that fit the bigger one and eventually put something on the toe for the smaller foot to reduce space?

I'm planning to buy Supreme One60 or 70 because i loved the feel of my One 20.. even if i've found the wider and shorter foot to have difficult on having a firm lock with the skate.. (but they were a bit oversized in length)


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