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-   -   Going from Non-Checking to Full Checking. (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=969883)

Maccas 08-17-2011 03:27 AM

Going from Non-Checking to Full Checking.
 
Hey Guys,
I have been playing Rec Hockey for about a year now and this September I am looking to change teams and join the local full checking team.
I'm 6ft and fairly skinny so not exactly going to be a huge hitter but I am a fairly competant skater (Certainly good enough for this level)
Are there any tips you can give me for making the transition?
Anything particular to learn/lookout for or anything I can practice on general skating sessions which can help me?

Cheers guys!

CGNY87 08-17-2011 08:38 AM

I dont play in a check league, but I would say KEEP YOU HEAD UP. Better to lose the puck than you head. :D

Pog Form 08-17-2011 08:41 AM

Keep your head up.

blueberrydanish 08-17-2011 10:12 AM

Also a big one incase you haven't learned it in non-check league...when going in for the puck against an opposing players remember its YOU or HIM, stand your ground unless you wanna be the one on the ice.

Kritter471 08-17-2011 04:01 PM

Er, how long have you been playing? If you've only been playing a year total, I wouldn't recommend going full check. People who play check hockey generally played as kids (since that's where they teach how to safely make and take hits), and you are going to be way over your head from a safety standpoint.

I know some really talented players who learned as adults, but none of them would go near check hockey because they simply don't have the muscle memory of how to safely take a hit. That's not something easily learned once you reach a certain age, and it's certainly not something to try and learn against players who already know what they're doing and assume you do as well.

Steelhead16 08-17-2011 04:48 PM

Are you playing forward or defense?

RandV 08-17-2011 06:17 PM

Yeah I started hockey as an adult and as much as I love contact sports I wouldn't touch a men's contact league. It's not a matter of handling the pain as much as it is the chance that having never been in contact hockey before I'll take a check out of position or with my head down and blow out my knee or get concussed. I have know debilitating injuries in my life at this point and I'd like to keep it that way, thanks!

But on the other hand if you're a teenager then it probably isn't so bad.

jwitz04 08-17-2011 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pog Form (Post 35990241)
Keep your head up.

^^^^

JVR21 08-17-2011 08:47 PM

Head up. Low center of gravity. Exert force into opposing player when taking a hit.

Guffaw 08-17-2011 09:25 PM

Maccass

I would suggest the same things that were already said mainly keeping your head up and not putting yourself in awkward positions ie. know someone is about to run you and prepare for it.

I would also add good equipment. Good helmet, elbow pads, shoulder pads, pants. You'll be hitting the ice more and that means bruised elbows and hips especially if you're on the skinny side. Ask me how I know.

How old are you? Most of us don't play check past college because it's just too much of a risk. Work, kids, mortgage, etc. The risk of injury is high enough without checking. I'm 38 and have been playing again for 5 months, no check adult league and pickup. My entire body hurts and that's without checking playing 2-3 times a week.

timekeep 08-17-2011 10:57 PM

put your weight on your inside foot when about to get hit. and like others have said keep your head up!

Maccas 08-18-2011 05:23 AM

I'm 24 and have been playing about a year now.
The team I am looking at don't play in a league (No league system in the UK) and to be honest with the exception of a few they aren't of a particularly high standard. Although they do play full contact they are fairly sensible with it (If you can be!) they will certainly give me time to learn before going in too hard and unless I run around like a headless chicken hitting everything in sight then I won't be hit too hard. They pretty much just do it for fun rather than competitively so I'm not too worried, I obviously just want to make sure I am well prepared!

noobman 08-18-2011 10:22 AM

In a contact league it's especially important to be aware of your surroundings. Keep your head up (as everyone has said) and look for passes. Learn how to throw hits (even if you don't do it that often) and more importantly learn how to receive hits.

Don't get caught admiring passes either. Once you throw it take a quick look around and get moving.

edog37 08-18-2011 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maccas (Post 36014509)
I'm 24 and have been playing about a year now.
The team I am looking at don't play in a league (No league system in the UK) and to be honest with the exception of a few they aren't of a particularly high standard. Although they do play full contact they are fairly sensible with it (If you can be!) they will certainly give me time to learn before going in too hard and unless I run around like a headless chicken hitting everything in sight then I won't be hit too hard. They pretty much just do it for fun rather than competitively so I'm not too worried, I obviously just want to make sure I am well prepared!


all that it takes is one ******* to really level you. Definitely keep your head up, never lock your knees & since you are somewhat limited on instruction based on where you are, research proper checking techniques before hand (USA Hockey has excellent material on this subject). Even though there are a lot of players out there with years of experience, very few know how to properly employ a check. They forget the purpose of checking is to separate the player from the puck, not the player from their consciousness.

jacklours 08-18-2011 11:12 AM

I can't believe no one mentionned it yet, but think about your teammates no one likes to be leveled. So no suicide passes and every passes you make has to be hard and fast. The longer it takes the more time a defender has to go hit your teammate and the less time your teammate has to avoid the contact.

If your not sure wether your pass could result in a player in your team getting hit, then don't do it. Start with real easy passes, learn the timing of people hitting and you'll learn when it's dasngerous to make a pass.

Don't rely on your teammates ''knowing'' they should catch a pass, it's the other way around, they are relying on YOU to make a pass that won't get thm killed.

RogerRoeper* 08-20-2011 07:08 PM

First learn how to take a hit and the rest will come into place

SensAreReligion 08-20-2011 10:19 PM

Know where the other team is on the ice.. Keep your head up

Frankie Spankie 08-21-2011 08:54 AM

I find it a little odd that you would go to a full checking league after just 1 year of ice hockey. I've been playing ice hockey for 5-6 years now and still wouldn't want to play in a full checking league because I bet I'll be caught with my head down.

Canadian91 08-21-2011 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frankie Spankie (Post 36088237)
I find it a little odd that you would go to a full checking league after just 1 year of ice hockey. I've been playing ice hockey for 5-6 years now and still wouldn't want to play in a full checking league because I bet I'll be caught with my head down.

Yeah, I agree. I'm trying out for a hitting team this year for the first time, and this is my 9th year of hockey coming up.

That being said, if you think that you're ready, then go ahead. There's nothing stopping you, just take all of this into consideration and plug it into your game.

Maccas 08-22-2011 08:02 AM

Thanks guys, there is some really good advice here.
I've just been having a look at the USA Hockey Heads Up Hockey Program and there is loads of information there.
The main reason I am considering Contact is more the team rather than wanting to go out hitting, the team I am looking at is by far the best of the local teams socially (I only have about 4 within travelling distance) and I already know many of the players.
Taking up contact after only a year did worry me but talking to a couple of coaches they said that it could actually help as I haven't particularly formed any bad habits etc so would be able to pick it up better than if I had been used to non-contact for a while.
Ultimately the full contact team will be a lot more fun and should hopefully develop me as a better player!

Pez68 08-23-2011 05:21 AM

Going from no-check to check hockey after playing for just a year? Against a bunch of guys that have likely been playing check hockey from the time they were kids? That's just asking to get hurt, regardless of the level of hockey these guys are playing. No offense, but you should stick to no-check... Even if these guys are taking it easy, they are doing so on the assumption that the people they are playing against know how to take hits. You DO NOT know how to take a hit, having never actually taken one before. What might seem like an easy hit to these guys, could send you crashing into the boards and cause serious damage. To be perfectly honest, playing check hockey with lower level players is actually more dangerous than playing check hockey with guys that have played at a high level all their lives. Not only because of their knowledge in taking and giving a hit, but because of their balance, speed, and ability to HOLD UP when the guy you are going to hit does something stupid.

Best advice is, have fun playing no-check hockey, and save yourself the hospital bills.

Ricky Bobby 08-23-2011 10:22 AM

You seem set on playing contact hockey for reasons you've stated in other posts.

A lot of good points have already been mentioned about needing to keep your head up, don't make suicide passes i.e. into guys skates in vulnerable positions (cutting across the middle of the ice).

Keep your center of gravity low and explode upwards generating power and force from your main core strength (hips and quads).

If your first the man in on a corner (i.e. a defencemen) do a shoulder check to see if someone is closing the gap quickly. If someone is coming take an angled approached towards the puck and brace yourself by putting your body in low and close to the boards. If your the forward coming in take it easy on the D man don't try to kill the Dman. Its only Rec hockey.

If coming down the side go into the boards if your going to have to take a hit instead of getting hit about 2 feet out and then falling akwardly into the boards.


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