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10-26-2009, 04:59 PM
  #209
Unspoken
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koseegin View Post
Yes it is discrimation both ways. Yet I don't see why someone who prefers the one situation that favors his cause can point the finger and complain about the other.

No one is arguing for the anglicization of Quebec. It's simple pointing out what is occuring. Look at the level of bilingualism of 15 years ago compared to now and I'm sure the numbers have increased significantly. If you took an anthropology class about the evolution of languages you'll see that they all occur in the same way. You have a land divided into two languages. One of the language is a dominant one because it is the language of commerce. The other fights to sustain the use of it's language, at first the language begins to adopt phrases from the dominant one(something which has occured and I believe the term is coined "anglicism") and eventually you have one culture who is perfectly bilingual. Once bilingualism occurs, those who speak both languages tend to use the dominant one more often because of it being the language of commerce and through a slow process the language is eventually drowned out.

The same will eventually happen to the english language as happened with Latin before it and so on. Crap evolves and changes.
Sorry, I,m late.
For a while, I didn't have time for long messages and, then, I forgot about this discussion.

Sure all languages change, borrow words from other languages, etc, but we're not talking about that here.

You can't say "no one is arguing for the anglicization of Quebec" and argue for "bilingualism" (as in learning english) in Quebec. Bilingualism in Quebec will lead to Anglicization.

You said it yourself. "Once bilingualism occurs, those who speak both languages tend to use the dominant one more often because of it being the language of commerce and through a slow process the language is eventually drowned out"
Therefore, if you argue for "bilingualism" (as in learning English) in Quebec, you're arguing for the Anglicization of Quebec.

I really hope Mandarin becomes an alternate language of commerce in the future. If this happens, globalization may become bilingual (or even, preferably, multilingual). This would help lower the pressure on small cultures and dying languages.

Right now, the forces of globalization are monolingual and everyone saying Quebecers should all be "bilingual" (most of the time, what they actually mean is that Quebecers should all speak English as a second or even a first language... which is not the same thing) is guilty of cultural imperialism: the English language above every other language on earth.

I'm saying, Quebecers should all be bilingual or even multilingual, but like in Europe, English shouldn't be the only other language beside French that is worth learning. Far from it. "Bilingual" should mean a diversity of second language: French and Spanish, French and Mandarin, French and Russian, French and German, French and English, French and Arabic, etc.

And I don't like the fact that, many here tend so easily generalize and portray the francophones of Quebec as racist/bigot/close-minded. This is also prejudiced AND racist.

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