View Single Post
Old
03-07-2010, 10:54 AM
  #42
TheSandman
Registered User
 
TheSandman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: San Jose
Posts: 1,180
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Ok, so here's a couple of things that you might want to add to your game for gap control...

First, lets look at this picture below.

here you will see that in order to have good gap control you must line up your outside shoulder to his inside shoulder. This alignment is important to force the puck carrier towards the out side. What you are really doing is giving him the Illusion that going to the outside would be better for him to go.

If you place your body directly in front, then you give him two options on which way to go. The last thing you want is to give him a choice. You direct him to where you want him to go. And, the best way is around and towards the boards to the out side.

Second, If you shoot left, with the butt end of the stick in your right hand, place the stick off to your right as you skate backwards. This also make the area towards the center...closed.

Third, as you get closer to blue line as you skate backwards, never place your stick in front of you as you skate backwards. This acts like a measurement stick and tells the puck carrier how much room he has left before the gap control starts.

So place the stick off to the side and just when he is with stick length, you do a sweep check with your stick and the puck will go in his feet or off to the side while he crosses the blue line, causing his team mate to go off side on the other end of the blue line.

Third, Look at this next picture...

This yellow zone is called the Shooting Zone. If the defenseman moves the winger out this area in the white area, he has completed 90% of his job. Why? He has placed the puck carrier into a low scoring percentage.

Hope this helps.
Head coach
This is excellent, thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SabresFreak97 View Post
I find being prepared is key to the game. I usually have an idea of how the player will react to a situation. Watch the games after yours(if there are any) or even come in and watch the ones before. After a while you get the idea of what you will see. I understand it's a beer league, but most guys are there to get better and the ones not playing might be able to help you out.

I'm a smallish(5'10" 175lbs) D-man who really can't rely on hitting, but relies on positioning, but average skater( I learned to skate by myself.) If I can anticipate the play I don't get beat hardly. I let them come to me and usually the guys will try to be fancy, and put the puck between the legs and pick it up on the other side. What I usually do is tie up their stick and use my skates to push the puck to the outside. Also try not to screen the goalie.

Line up your outside shin pad with the puck. I find most players will just shoot into you and then you just have to chip it out. Simple plays make hockey a whole lot easier. I get yelled at by my teammates for not putting the guy on his butt, but the goalie will thank me at the end of the game. The boards are your friend.

On two on ones I let the goalie get a good view of the puck but at the same time keep my stick next to/in front of his stick. It gives the opportunity for you to deflect the puck out and kill the play and gives the player no where to pass since your stick is right there. Keep your self balanced between the two guys.

Just some ideas I find work for any kind of league.
Good stuff. This and other posts have made me more aware of my positioning.

TheSandman is offline   Reply With Quote