View Single Post
Old
03-19-2010, 08:49 AM
  #1
Skraut
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Enter city here
Posts: 10,339
vCash: 500
Dryland Stickwork and Shooting

I'm still relatively new to the game, having only started skating last summer. And while I'm taking 3 different skating lessons a week, in addition to a game or two, the one thing that stands out is that my skating is rapidly improving, while my stickwork is not.

I still get that "Oh god, please don't pass to me!" feeling every time I'm out there, and it's probably why I enjoy playing defense so much.

What kind of setup should I look at for setting up something at home to practice my stickwork, and have something to shoot on/against.

My basement is fully finished and has low ceilings, the driveway is pretty steep. but I have a covered back deck I'm looking at as a possibility. I would obviously need to put some flat wood down as a base, then some sort of skill pad/synthetic ice thing.

The question I have is the shoes. Without skates I would be a few inches shorter. Should I get a "dryland stick" which is shorter to compensate? How do you practice the weight transfer of shots, especially the slapshot, in just shoes. I have an old pair of speed skate style inlines, should I wear them to compensate for those things?

I've seen a few YouTube videos where people have made their own skill pads on the cheap. Are those good enough for a beginner, or if I can afford it, would I get more out of something like Tape 2 Tape?

Has anybody used a shooting tarp like this? http://www.hockeyshot.com/Hockey_Sho...t-tarp-015.htm I'd need something like that on the side of the porch to keep from pegging the neighbor's house. Seems a bit expensive compared to just a regular tarp, but then again, I don't know how much beating a regular tarp could take.

I know there's a lot of questions in this, but just looking for suggestions and guidance in nailing down the one aspect of the game I fear so much, actually touching the puck.

Skraut is offline   Reply With Quote