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03-22-2010, 01:55 AM
  #5
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavboyz View Post
I was wondering if anyone has looked into this one, I was doing some google searching but did not come up with any great answers. I thought I would open it up for discussion.

Say a strong player is breaking a lot of sticks at 95 flex, and takes a lot of slapshots. Would he be wiser to move up to a 105 flex, or down to an 85 flex?
I'm 6ft 4in and 240-245 lbs and use a 100 flex, anything less than that is too whippy. I fiorst tried out Bauer One55 shafts ... not really a good example because they are thick shafts and not very light but the first two composites I tried to see if I would like them were shafts with pro-stock blades in them.

I have posted about it in here before and hate to repeat but to refresh I shoot really hard slapshots even now at almost 42 years old. I rarely if ever have broken ANY sticks in my life time as far as the shafts go. I used wood for 35 years or so and then wood or aluminum shafts (never folded any of those over [warped a couple of them though] either or launched any boomerangs from broken wood blades) and then now 2 piece composites which I started using in December of late 2008 .... the Bauer One55 shafts. After about a month and a half I switched to Harrow shafts, the 300 series at 100 Flex. The bauer One55 shafts are too heavy honestly but durable.

I should be using a 115 or 120 Flex and hope to try Harrow's new ones someone in here informed me of in a thread that are coming soon.

BUT to answer your request for opinions the One55 shafts are an 87 flex and way too whippy for me. I have taken many slapshots with them outdoors mainly for practice and nothing happened to them. I still have them and they are still intact except for a dent in the shaft from getting hit with a puck from someone else's slapshot or I was slashed or something. It was something I noticed after I got home.

I know for a fact I shoot very hard and I have not broken any shafts. I broke a couple of woodies taking faceoffs before on the backhand and the shaft fell apart splintering in half. I have had people step on my wooden blades and broke them but not from shooting.

My sticks that were wood always were destroyed with puck pocket in the blade from shooting pucks. never had shaft issues ever with any type of sticks.

Cheap plywood shafts break for anyone and I have broken those before when I was younger and poorer and could only afford cheapies for a stretch.

So we have my taking slapshots with an 87 flex cheaper composite shaft with no breakage, the One55 shafts. Also Harrow 300 series 100 flex shafts, no breakage with those either.

I have broken 2 composite blades in about 14 to 15 months, one blade broke catching a one timer too far on the toe on a wobbly knuckle pass puck and the other broke blocking a slapshot ... it was cracked and I used it for about another 2 months before it broke one timing a snapshot redirect type shot. I was surpised by how rugged the blade was still even after cracking. I used that blade from last April until about a month ago almost.

Now this being said the most common problem for teens and short players and sticks breaking are when the stick is cut too short for the flex rating. For example some guy cutting quite a few inches off a stick that already had a high flex rating because he did not know any better and ending up with a 120 flex for a 5ft 8in 140lb teen.

The blades on a two piece break off at the hosel joint because of that. The stick cannot absorb the shock and torque properly and it breaks easily.

Poor mechanics will break sticks much in the same way catching a baseball too high on the end of a bat in baseball will shatter a bat. I really believe this applies to hockey sticks whether they are wood or composite.

I mean I definitely shoot hard enough to snap sticks and I do not yet see some guys break them easily and am guessing they are not getting the sweet spot properly.

I think most stick breakages happen from the shaft getting whacked, blocking shots, getting mad and slapping the stick on the ice with a two hander etc.

It weakens a spot and then breaks later when someone is just recieving a pass. Basically I am saying if one has good mechanics and are using the correct flex that they should not break many sticks under normal use.

Well there is my long winded opinion on the matter lol.

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