Thread: Motivation
View Single Post
Old
06-04-2010, 04:36 PM
  #7
SERE 24
LGR
 
SERE 24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 9,877
vCash: 500
He doesn't really *need* off ice training yet. 15 is young. If he's progressing rapidly, he will either continue to improve as he stays on the ice and the competition gets stiffer or he will eventually hit a wall. The best thing is to keep him on the ice.

You said you'd like to see him practice harder; does he not really work hard in practice? He doesn't have to kill himself, but it would be good if he put in a solid effort every practice. I always enjoyed finishing my sprints first and making practice into a little mini-competition against my teammates to motivate myself.

At the end of the day though, he needs to keep playing - the more time he's on the ice the better he will get - and see how far skills can take him. I didn't start real off-ice training or do any weights/isometrics until I was about 17. I played my college hockey for UVM and it wasn't really until college that I started to consider bulking up and focusing on off-ice training and such. A handful of the guys I played with have been drafted. I'm pretty sure that for the most part, none of them really started training hard off-ice until they were almost college aged as well. If you're kid wants to really take it seriously, let him see how far he's gotten by the time he's 16-17. If he's still making rapid progress, he can worry about stepping up his training then.

Edit: what was most important was loving the game and always WANTING to be on the ice.


Last edited by SERE 24: 06-04-2010 at 05:06 PM.
SERE 24 is offline   Reply With Quote