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09-03-2010, 02:35 PM
  #3
BrockH
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Location: Toronto, ON
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There's no such thing as a true 'edge' in inline, but as far as technique goes the principle is still fairly transferable. Air's right, you do need to rotate your wheels periodically, but you also need to replace them before they're completely worn. When you first get a pair of wheels, the surface is completely smooth. This means more points of contact with the ground and better grip. As wheels wear, they become less even and you lose some of those points of contact, meaning your wheel could slip more. If it's extremely worn, the angle of the wheel will also tend to change which has a more pronounced impact.

If you use your wheels exclusively indoor on smooth cement, the wear should be very even and smooth. If that's the case, then rotating your wheels is still a necessity but they should last you a very long time (3 months would not be enough to wear them down). If you use them outdoors though even a few times, any surface with bumps is going to cause the kind of uneven wear that reduces grip. If that's the case, I'd say get some new wheels and use those wheels exclusively for inline hockey.

Most of my experience comes inline speed skating (which I do indoor and outdoor, with different sets of wheels for each). One set of wheels will last me a year or 2 indoors. One set will last me 80km outdoors. Use the indoor wheels outside even once, and there no good for indoor racing anymore.

You should check the durometer rating on your wheels (indicates how hard they are). Typically, the harder the wheel, the less grip but the faster it goes (less friction and give). Also, hard wheel = rougher ride on bumpy surfaces. I skate on 83a or 85a wheels, the hardest I've seen are 87a. Assuming a smooth cement surface (which is what I grew up playing inline on), you would probably want something softer since I'm either on asphalt or surfaces specifically designed to grip at high speeds. I'd guess high 70s but I don't really know.


Last edited by BrockH: 09-03-2010 at 02:46 PM.
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