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02-02-2011, 07:57 PM
  #23
jarek
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Earl Seibert, D



6'2, 220 lbs.
Right handed shot
2 Stanley Cups

NHL Scoring among D

2nd (1934), 3rd (1935, 1938, 1941, 1943), 4th (1942, 1945), 5th (1936, 1937), 6th (1939, 1944), 8th (1940), 9th (1932)

Playoff Scoring among D

1st (1938)*, 4th (1932), 5th (1945), 6th (1933, 1936), 7th (1944)

*3rd among all players

From 1934-1945, Seibert was 3rd among defensemen in points, with 86% of 1st place and 99% of 2nd place (7th in points per game among players who played 100 or more games, 76% of 1st place and 81% of 2nd place).

During Seibert's entire playoff career (1932-1945), Seibert was 3rd in playoff points among defensemen, with 59% of 1st place. In terms of points per game, he had only 48% of Butch Bouchard, but he compares much better with Babe Pratt (63%) and Flash Hollett (67%), but he was definitely much better all around than both of those guys. He compared very favorably to everyone else during this period, including Eddie Shore (76%), Wally Stanowski (83%), and King Clancy (94%). Clearly he was quite a good playoff performer, despite playing largely for miserable teams.

Award Voting

Hart: 4th (1934, 1944)

First Team All Star (1935, 1942, 1943, 1944)
Second Team All Star (1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941)

Joe Pelletier

Quote:
... Seibert quickly developed into a star on the blue line. ...

... Seibert quickly emerged as a no-nonsense defender with a reputation as among the toughest in the game. ...

... “Let’s put it this way, no one wanted any part of ‘Si’ in a fight. Even Eddie Shore (Boston) and Red Horner (Toronto) steered clear of him, and Shore and Horner were considered the toughest guys in the League at the time," said Johnson. ...

... But Seibert was much more than just a rearguard roughian. He was a great shot blocker, and he was a far better skater and puck handler than the departed Abel. Seibert rarely gets remembered as the excellent hockey player that he was. Between 1934-35 and 1943-44, he made the All Star team 10 seasons in a row, six times on the first squad and four times on the second squad. Some old timers insist only Eddie Shore was better. ...

... Though he was intimidating and unforgiving, most of the time Seibert was very clean. ...

... He played a huge role in what was his second Stanley Cup championship in 1938. It was an unexpected, Cinderella run to the championship by Chicago. ...
Legends of Hockey

Quote:
... Seibert's demeanor was always serious. On the ice, this manifested itself in mature play and tremendous leadership. ...

... It was in the Windy City that Seibert established himself as one of the best defensemen of his era. He was named to the First or Second All-Star Team each year between 1935 and 1944, a feat surpassed only by Gordie Howe, Maurice Richard, Bobby Hull and Doug Harvey. Seibert was generally regarded as second only to Eddie Shore in terms of skill and rugged play, and Shore once confessed that Seibert was the only man he was afraid to fight. Defensively, Seibert was one of the best shot-blockers in the game, and he could move the puck just as quickly as anyone. ...
Ultimate Hockey

Quote:
... Seibert was a strong, fast skater, an intimidating force with his stick and his body. He was also one of the better shot blockers around. Family friend Joe Pompel later said of Seibert, "He has an acceletation with his second step that no one could match and he was probably the fastest skater of the 1930s." Earl also owned excellent puck-handling skills and he was almost impossible to knock off his skates. ...

... Seibert was the biggest factor in Chicago's Cinderella Stanley Cup victory in 1938 ... Kings of the Ice elaborates: "The biggest reason we won," coach Bill Stewart asserted, "was that we had Earl Seibert on our defense. The big guy played about 55 minutes a game."

... Shore later said of the only man he was ever afraid to fight: "It's lucky he was a calm boy, because if he ever got mad, he'd have killed us all." ...
The Trail of the Stanley Cup

Quote:
... Over six feet tall and almost 200 pounds, he was very fast and a superb checker both with his stick and his body. He was an excellent stickhandler ...

... He drew a lot of penalties but they were largely in the line of duty and he was not inclined to enter needless battles. ...
Newspaper Quotes

Quote:
"Stewart had ... an outstanding two-way defenceman in Earl Seibert ..." - Montreal Gazette, Dec. 28, 1938
Quote:
"Earl Seibert remains one of the best two-way rearguards in the league. He is a powerful bodychecker, good blocker and cyclonic rusher." - Montreal Gazette, Dec. 28, 1938
Quote:
"I don't think there is a better defense player in the league than Earl Seibert," he (Clem Loughlin, Hawks manager) said ...
... Seibert played a hard game at the defense position. His exhibition, in Loughlin's opinion, stamped him as "a more valuable player than Eddie Shore, Babe Siebert or Ebbie Goodfellow." ...
..."Seibert is down to his playing weight of 210 pounds right now," Loughlin said. "Although he weighs more than the defence starts I have mentioned, he can break faster and skate faster than any of them." - Leader-Post, Oct. 27, 1936
Quote:
"Seibert, whose sharp-shooting eye and natural speed ..." - Telegraph, Jan. 29, 1938
Quote:
"... Earl "Si" Seibert, flashy New York Ranger defenseman ..." - Montreal Gazette, Jan. 16, 1936
Quote:
"Earl Seibert, probably the best defence player in the league ..." - Ottawa Citizen, Dec. 4, 1942
Quote:
"Earl Seibert of Chicago Black Hawks, for instance, would be accorded high rating defensively by any impartial tribual. Offensively, the Chicago star ranks second only to Walter (Babe) Pratt of Toronto Maple Leafs. ...
... Without Seibert, the Chicago defense collapsed." - Leader-Post, Jan. 23, 1943
Quote:
"Seibert emerged yesterday for a brief workout and got a broken nose when struck by a stray puck. Now he'll carry two injuries and a nose guard into the playoffs." - Vancouver Sun, Mar. 15, 1940
Quote:
"Seibert, the bulwark of the Chicago club's defense for years - he has played 55 of 60 minutes - ..." - Lewiston Evening Journal, Dec. 29, 1944
Quote:
"... and big Earl Seibert sparking the attack ..." - Feb. 5, 1945
Quote:
"Hawks are pinning their hopes of victory on their great defensive trio of Art Wiebe, Mike Karakas and Earl Seibert, who were largely responsible for the downfall of Detroit. Karakas, former Chicago goalie recalled by the club late in the season, literally "goaled" his team into the final round, while Seibert has been both the defensive and offensive sparkplug of the squad all season." - Montreal Gazette, Apr. 4, 1944
Quote:
"They are Earl Seibert, the speedy heavyweight who can score consistently ..." - Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 27, 1941
Quote:
"They (Canadiens and Hawks) met in a semifinal in 1938, and Earl Seibert, still the kingpin of the Hawk defence, sparked an attack which carried the Chicagoans into the finals and on to the Stanley Cup." - Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, Apr. 4, 1944
Quote:
"And finally one pillar-of-strength two-way defenseman as your spark and rallying-point (an Earl Seibert or a Dit Clapper)" - Montreal Gazette, Feb. 26, 1942 (talking about building a championship team)
Quote:
"Capt Earl Seibert will be featured as a deluxe specimen of needlepoint embroidery when he appears at his usual Blackhawk defense position ..." - Chicago Tribune, Feb. 9, 1944
Quote:
"... Earl Seibert turning in some scintillating hockey ..." - Montreal Gazette, Apr. 5, 1944
Quote:
"If and when a hockey "Fall of Fame" is established in Canada - one guy who would seem to richly deserve entry is Earl Seibert, currently starring on defense for Detroit Red Wings. The swashbuckling Seibert has a brilliant 14-year record in the National Hockey League behind him and experts claim he's every bit as good today as at any stage of his sparkling career. Earl is 33 years of age and, barring accidents, has many good years of hockey left in him. A deadly shot and noted as one of the most solid bodycheckers in the business, Seibert is among the few remaining defencemen who can carry the puck from end to end. He spurns modern methods of hurling the rubber into a corner and chasing it." - Maple Leaf, Feb. 10, 1945
Quote:
"It is more than likely that the defensive strength added to the team by old Professor Adams when he secured Earl Seibert is the real cause of the improvement in the work of goalie Lumley." - Montreal Gazette, Jan. 12, 1945
Quote:
"Boston's Arthur Ross is just one of the many well-versed hockey men who believes Detroit Red Wings traded themselves to a Stanley Cup when they obtained Earl Seibert...Toronto's Conny Smythe backs up the Ross claim and looks upon Red Wings as the club to take it all...even Montreal isn't so sure but what they're right...they all agree Seibert will be a damaging fellow in the playoffs now that he isn't carrying a whole team around on his back, which was his chore at Chicago...even goalie Frank McCool of the Leafs gets in a plug for Seibert when he remarks that massive Earl is the most fearsome sight in the whole NHL when he comes charging over the blue line..."you just hope somebody gets him before he blasts you, net and all, right out of the rink," ..." - Leader-Post, Jan. 11, 1945
Quote:
"The club is solid at the blueline with such stalwart defenders as Jack Stewart, Earl Seibert, Flash Hollett and Bill Quackenbush to stop the advancement of opposing forwards." - Montreal Gazette, Nov. 23, 1945
Quote:
"Earl Seibert, who has been accalimed as one of the outstanding rearguards during the past five years, will be back as captain ..." - Montreal Gazette, Nov. 8, 1944
Quote:
"Thompson still has four experienced men for his defence positions. They are Earl Seibert, the speedy bruiser who can score consistently ..." - Edmonton Journal, Oct. 25, 1941
Quote:
"Look who's one of the best defencemen in the NHL now - Earl Seibert. And why? Because, although he's getting old and slow, he knows what to do and he lays his passes where they count." - Calgary Herald, Jan. 5, 1944
Quote:
"As for the other three (All Star positions), Earl Seibert, Art Coulter and Ebbie Goodfellow you could just about put their names in a hat and take whichever one you happened to pick. We took Seibert becasue he is still the backbone of the Chicago team - a whale of a defenceman and a dangerous puck carrier." - Windsor Daily Star, Feb. 25, 1941
The following are detailed play by plays of Seibert's work in specific games.

Quote:
Chicago's defence, featuring big Earl Seibert, again was air-tight and told much of the story. - Montreal Gazette, Mar. 31, 1944
Quote:
The Bruins tried a five-man rush and, when it was broken up by Earl Seibert, that big defenseman put a long pass on Allen' stick and Allen was unchallenged as he went in to beat Courteau from ten feet out. - New York Times, Feb. 2, 1944
Quote:
Earl Seibert stood out on the Hawk defense, among the best exhibitions made by the club this year. In the second period the defenseman gave a demonstration of body checking that had a crowd of 12,306 persons yelling for more. - New York Times, Mar. 21, 1941
Quote:
Two of the Hawks' goals came when they themselves were shorthanded. Earl Seibert defence man who accounted for the first two scores, rode alone from the middle of the ice to beat Tiny Thompson for the first goal after intercepting a pass. - Montreal Gazette, Dec. 23, 1938
Quote:
Earl Seibert, who played a whale of a defense game for New York ... - Border Cities Star, Jan. 3, 1934
Quote:
Earl Seibert's three solo rushes taxed the fatigued Americans so much that Trudell was able to skate around Jerwa with the puck and Dahlstrom had no trouble (cuts off here) ... - Chicago Tribune, Apr. 2, 1938
Quote:
With Earl Seibert taking a big part in the attack, the Blue Shirts charged savagely, and swept into American ice often. - New York Times, Dec. 13, 1933
Quote:
The mighty defensive of Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert in the second half smothered the American rushes time and time again, and a shutout victory loomed for Aitkenhead as the period closed. - New York Times, Dec. 9, 1932
Quote:
Earl Seibert ploughed through the Boston defense to test the goalie with hard shots. - New York Times, Dec. 3, 1933
Quote:
Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert, the regular Ranger defense pair, saw to it that the younger Rangers were used only for occasional relief duty. - Chicago Tribune, Jan. 20, 1935
Quote:
Again Earl Seibert and Paul Thompson, main designers of Thursday's shutout in Chicago, played leading roles. Seibert fired the tying counter and Thompson, top scorer in the American division, won the game with a steaming shot from the left wing. - Calgary Daily Herald, Mar. 28, 1938, playoffs against Canadiens
Quote:
Rangers' big shot was Earl Seibert, who sailed down the ice with the greatest of ease like the daring young man on the flying trapese and then sailed back again with equal effectiveness, in a great two-way display. - Montreal Gazette, Feb. 16, 1934
Quote:
... big Earl Seibert getting two sensational "billiard shot" goals ... Seibert, fast-skating defenseman ... Seibert scored on two brilliant solo dashes ... - New York Times, March 25, 1938
Quote:
With the score deadlocked and a teammate, Marty Burke, serving a penalty, Seibert, husky Hawk defense man, grabbed a loose puck, outraced several Americans and scored unassistsed, feinting goalie Worters out of the net before ramming the dist into the net. - New York Times, Dec. 21, 1936
Quote:
With Earl Seibert starting most of the plays ... At this stage Ripley and Dillon charged into Boston ice and the latter passed to Seibert, who fought his way up to the net. ... Both teams put on the pressure, but finally Seibert drove down the right side, went around the net as Shore and Smith charged and then passed out to Cox, who knotted the count 3-all. ... After gambling desperately for seven minutes, the Rangers deadlocked the game for the third time on Boucher's shot. The speedy Seibert started the play and passed to Bun Cook after breaking over the Boston line. A minute later, on another play started by Seibert, Bun Cook split the Boston defense and caged a close-up shot that put the Rangers on top, 5-4. - New York Times, Feb. 14, 1934
Quote:
... and in the third frame Earl Seibert clinched the victory with a thrilling solo tally. - New York Times, Feb. 19, 1934 ... Seibert interrupted one of their advances to snare the puck, dashed well into Boston ice and beat Thompson with a straight shot in 4:49. - New York Times, Feb. 19, 1934
Quote:
In the middle chapter the Wings tried desperately to keep the play in Ranger territory, but sterling defensive work by Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert Aitkenhead out of danger. In addition to breaking up several Detroit advances, Seibert made a number of dashes into the visitors' zone and came close to scoring. - New York Times, Nov. 17, 1933
Quote:
So efficient were the Ranger defensemen, particularly Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert, that Aitkenhead was called upon to make a total of only nine saves in the first two periods. - New York Times, Mar. 27, 1933
Quote:
Seibert makes no secret of the resentment he feels over the trade which removed him from among Lester Patrick's Blue Shirts, and it is expected his defense play will be particularly keen. - New York Times, Jan. 21, 1936
Quote:
The New Yorkers made their strongest bid in the second when they rattled sixteen shots at the Northerns' cage. Earl Seibert, the big defense star, played a large part in the Rangers' offensive in this session, and several times sent blistering shots that looked too hot for the Senator goalie to handle. - New York TImes, Dec. 22, 1933
Quote:
And Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert, the New Yorkers' defensive stalwarts, evinced an eagerness for savage, bone-crushing contact that made it almost perilous, indeed, for the Canadiens who essayed to advance. - New York Times, Dec. 8, 1933
Quote:
Earl Seibert and Ott Heller of the Rangers shared honors, with Eddie Shore and Babe Siebert as defensive standouts. They accorded their respective goalies considerable help in fending off powerful, well organized enemy attacks. - New York Times, Feb. 25, 1935
Quote:
A penalty to Hal Cotton, for high sticking Brydson, opened the way for Chicago's first counter. Earl Seibert made a thrilling dash through the American defense, to get off a shot that bounced from Worters' stick. Paul Thompson took the rebound and handed the puck to Gottselig, who beat the New York goalie with a short drive in 14:05. - New York Times, Feb. 14, 1936
Quote:
A crowd of 9,387 saw the Leafs offense disorganized by a strong Chicago attack led by Earl Seibert. - New York Times, Nov. 6, 1938
As effective as the Ranger attack was it was their defense that caught the fancy of many of the onlookers. Ching Johnson and Earl Seibert turned in their best performances of the local season and their relief men, Ott Heller and Harold Starr, spelled them commendably. - New York Times, Jan. 21, 1935
Quote:
Detroit had big Earl Seibert, recently obtained in a swap for three players from the Black Hawks, in its line-up. Seibert, of course, turned in his usually dependable game ... - New York Times, Jan. 5, 1945
Quote:
Fine defensive work by Earl Seibert marked the start of the second session. He was called upon twice to stop Detroit rushes and each time carried out his assignment brilliantly. - New York Times, Mar. 31, 1933


Last edited by jarek: 02-27-2011 at 08:13 PM.
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