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02-24-2011, 03:26 PM
  #80
Nalyd Psycho
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Gordie "Doc" Roberts

Four time top 10 in NHA Scoring: (3rd, 3rd, 6th, 9th)
Three time top 10 in PCHA Scoring: (1st, 2nd, 5th)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen - Jan 19, 1910
Every time the Westerners broke away they found either Walsh and Ridpath or Roberts and Stuart skating between them to intercept the pass or take the puck away. Coupled with this wonderful following back of the Ottawa forwards...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen - Jan 19, 1910
Gordon Roberts, the former Emmett player, however, was the real sensation of the night. Roberts stacked up against the great "Hay" Millar, and what he didn't do to the curly haired broncho buster from the wild and wooly isn't worth mentioning. Suffice to say that Roberts checked Millar to a standstill, and in addition notched no less than four of the Ottawa goals-a phenominal performance for a youngster. Roberts' stickhandling, his shooting and following back were beautiful, he driving two of Ottawa's goals past Winchester in the last half from very difficult angles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Jun 17, 1929
Gordie Roberts as he was known in the bygone days of hockey was probably the greatest left-hand shot the game ever knew. Some say Babe Dye or Harry Cameron were just as good as Roberts when with Toronto St. Pats. Others say Roberts stood alone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz O'Meara, Ottawa Journal via The Border Cities Star - Jun 17, 1929
All hockey addicts and who isn't, remeber Gordie Roberts who carried more smoke in his left hand than probably any hockey player that ever laced on a skate. Roberts was a great left wing, one of the greatest that ever shuffled down the left side and let fly without telegraphing at some hapless goal tend who crossed his path.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Jun 17, 1929
Clint Banadict once swore by the beard of his grandfather that Roberts could curve a puck and he always had that reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Jun 17, 1929
He had a swaying style of skating and he hunched his shoulders as he loomed up before the defence and just let blaze a shoulder high shot that had a habit of streaking down below the waist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Jun 17, 1929
Malcolm Brice, one of the brightest little men that ever tapped a typewriter in sport and a sport editor who stood at "tops" when he ran the old Free Press sheet here, always maintained Roberts had the hardest and most deceptive shot in hockey.

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