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03-10-2011, 11:22 PM
  #118
overpass
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Dan Bain, C


Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
the muscular Bain provided scoring, playmaking and a physical presence to two Stanley Cup championship squads. Along with his great skills on ice, he was blessed with natural leadership qualities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
He first played top-level hockey with the Victorias of the Manitoba Hockey League in 1895, quickly establishing himself as an outstanding center and valuable team leader.
...
Bain proved to be the overtime hero in the second match. In the process the skillful forward made history by registering the first-ever extra-time Cup-winning goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbc.ca: Hockey: A people's history
One of Canada's first great athletes, Donald H. (Dan) Bain went on to become hockey's original overtime hero.
...
Considered one of the finest playmakers of the pre-NHL era, the muscular Bain scored the Stanley Cup-winning goal in Winnipeg's stunning upset of the mighty Montreal Victorias in 1896 – the first time a team from outside Montreal won hockey's most coveted prize.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Besides being a fabulous skater, the muscular, mustachioed Bain was a sure stickhandler who possessed a superb, heavy shot and a knack for setting up goals. He excelled in the physical aspects of the game and was known throughout Canada as a brilliant all-around "hockeyist." The only quality he seemed to lack was patience with those unable to keep up with him in a game. In the early 1960s, he was interviewed at his country cottage, and he had a few choice words regarding the modern game of hockey: "They can't stick-handle or pass in today's game. I can't stand to watch it! When we passed in my day on the ice, the puck never left the ice and if a wing-man wasn't there to receive the pass, it was because he had a broken leg."
-Inaugural member of the HHOF in 1945
-6'0", 185 lbs in the 1890s was very big.
- Named the toughest player and finest athlete of the 1890's by the Ultimate Hockey book

-Won the Stanley Cup in 1896, 1901.
-Captain of the Winnipeg Victorias
-Bain scored the Cup winning goal in 1896 to make the Victorias the first non-Montreal team to win the Cup. Before this victory, hockey was largely considered an eastern Canadian game.
- Bain also scored the Cup winning goal in 1901, this time in overtime, making him “hockey’s original overtime hero.”

-10 goals in 11 Cup challenge games
-66 goals in 27 Manitoba league games / 3 times the scoring leader

-Voted Canada's athlete of the second half of the 19th century
- “Honoured Member” of the Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
- excelled at multiple sports and won his last figure skating title at age 56, a testament to his skating ability (thanks MadArcand)
-Arguably the best mustache in hockey history

-in 1944 before the inaugural class was announced, the following players were considered “nearly certain” to be in the first class: Georges Vezina, Hod Stuart, Howie Morenz, Tommy Phillips, Cyclone Taylor, Russell Bowie, Dan Bain, Frank McGee. Source = http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...winnipeg&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun, 1932
WHOSE THE GREATEST HOCKEY STAR? (Summary of first 3 paragraphs: Everyone in the East things Howie Morenz is the greatest player ever. But how could he be as good as the guys who played back in the good old days of seven man hockey when players had to play the full 60 minutes? The old timers prefer Tommy Phillips, who could do everything).

Coast fans, who didn't get an opportunity to see the old-time easterners in action, find it hard to believe that anyone could be better than Fred "Cyclone" Taylor or Mickey MacKay were in their day. They were wonderful players too. Then there was Frank McGee of the famous Ottawa Silver Seven, and we can go right back as far as Dan Bain, a rushing, hard-shooting, forward of the Winnipeg Victorias and (description of undrafted player removed), both prominent in the early days of Stanley Cup history.
Thanks to MadArcand - most of this material was shamelessly copied from his excellent bio.
Thanks to TheDevilMadeMe - I scooped Bain from him, and he sent me the bio material that he had prepared, some of which was from MadArcand's bio and some of which was new.

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