View Single Post
Old
03-27-2011, 03:15 PM
  #159
Velociraptor
Registered User
 
Velociraptor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Maritimes
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,912
vCash: 500
Barry Ashbee, D

Position: Defenseman
HT/WT: 5'10", 180 lbs
Shoots: Right
Nickname(s): "Ash Can"



- 2-time Stanley Cup Champion (1974, *1975) *As an assistant coach
- 1 acknowledgement for Second NHL All-Star Team (1974)
- 15 goals, 85 regular season points in 284 games played.
- 4 playoff points in 17 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Heroes of the Past
Barry Ashbee was an everyman player who epitomized the Broad Street Bullies-era Flyers. Whatever he lacked in natural talent he made up for in work ethic and hunger to win. Ashbee was a man whose personality and playing style were deceptively prickly and rough hewn but who possessed as much character and inner strength as anyone who has ever been a professional athlete. There was nothing phony or pretentious about the guy teammates called "Ash Can."

Ashbee saw the world and the sport of hockey in black and white. You worked hard, you didn't make excuses for failure and you didn't expect a pat on the back for doing what was expected of you. Ashbee despised egotists and glad-handers. He believed in results, not words.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Heroes of the Past
He was a solid, physical defenseman, but an average skater and passer. Apart from the legendary Eddie Shore, defensemen played little offensive role when Ashbee grew up learning the game. It would be a long time until Bobby Orr came along to regularly join the rush and revolutionized the position, setting the standard for what are now known as "two-way" defensemen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Clarke
Barry Ashbee was the strongest guy mentally I've ever seen.
Quote:
The other Flyers concurred. Hockey players are a tough breed by nature but Ashbee's stoicism impressed even his most hardened teammates. Even so, Ashbee remained somewhat of a loner once the season started. He was there to play, and win, hockey games, not win popularity contests. Teammates who got on Ashbee's bad side quickly learned his will was stronger than theirs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Heroes of the Past
The likes of Montreal Canadiens legend Jean Beliveau touted him as a deserving All-Star. But as midseason rolled around, Ashbee was left off the Western Division All-Star team. Ashbee was angry. Ashbee took out his frustration on the rest of the NHL. He finished the year with a phenomenal plus-minus rating of +52, best on the team. After the season, Ashbee's mid-season slight was corrected when he was named a second team NHL All-Star by the league and selected to the All-Western Conference team compiled by The Hockey News. But individual honors were secondary to Ashbee. He wanted hockey's ultimate prize – the Stanley Cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Heroes of the Past
Ashbee is enshrined in the Flyers Hall of Fame not so much to venerate his career but to honor his spirit. By celebrating Barry Ashbee, the Flyers also pay tribute to all the players who came before and after him, men who toiled and sacrificed just for a chance to play. Just as importantly, Ashbee possessed extraordinary character and dignity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Barry was a valuable performer on the Flyers blue line, and a key member of the 1974 team that defeated, oddly enough, the Bruins for the Stanley Cup. He wasn't your stereotypical "Broad Street Bully". He tallied only 291 PIM in 284 NHL contests. Instead he was a throwback defenseman who excelled ruggedly, though cleanly..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Even though he wasn't tough in the sense of Hammer Schultz or Hound Dog Kelly, Ashbee was probably the toughest member of the Flyers. Because of his physical play, Ashbee accumulated injuries like kids collected hockey cards. He often wore a "horse collar" neck support while playing the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
He suffered a career-ending eye injury during the 1974 Stanley Cup Playoffs, but was obviously part of the teams triumph and success and had his name engraved on the cup. Ashbee began his second career in hockey as an assistant coach, where the Flyers won the cup in consecutive years. But by 1977 disaster would strike again. He was diagnosed with deadly Leukemia.

"The players know I'm sick, and I'm going to get better, that's all," understated Barry in typical form, not wanting to make a big deal of his misfortune.

About a month after he said that from his hospital bed, he passed away on May 12, 1977.

In honor of their fallen friend, the Flyers have named a trophy after Ashbee. Since 1975 the Flyers most outstanding defenseman has been given the Barry Ashbee award. In addition, his jersey number 4 is forever retired.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
The Flyers acquired him from the Bears and he became not only one of the more reliable defencemen in the league but among the most popular athletes in the city. He was as tough as any "Broad Street Bully" of that generation, and in February 1973 he was suspended for eight games for striking referee Bryan Lewis because he was upset with a penalty call.


Last edited by Velociraptor: 03-27-2011 at 08:19 PM.
Velociraptor is offline   Reply With Quote