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05-08-2011, 11:32 PM
  #38
FreshPerspective
We don't need one!
 
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In other words......... GET A BONAFIDE GOALIE HOLMGREN AND STOP BEING IN DENIAL BECAUSE YOU ARE TRYING TO SAVE FACE. YOU ARE FOOLING NOBODY BUT YOURSELF....

Recchi on goaltending

Quote:
"Goaltending . . . I believe, is a function of your team," Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren said.

"It plays on your mind," Bruins forward Mark Recchi said. Twice a Flyer, he has lived and died many a playoff death with it. He was there for Roman Cechmanek. The Flyers didn't score much for him, either.

"You don't have that confidence," Recchi said. "You don't know what to expect as a team, and it doesn't allow you to play the way you're supposed to play, the way you want to play."


Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/...#ixzz1LpFpXDO2

Meltzer on the goaltending dilemma

Quote:
Last year after the Stanley Cup Final, it suddenly became fashionable around the NHL to say that a team can win with "average" goaltending as long as it scores enough and has a strong team defense in place. I never agreed with that idea. While a team need not have a big-name goalie to reach the Final or win the Cup, the goalie (regardless of his past reputation) has to play solid hockey and inspire confidence in his team.

It's not just about how many goals a team's goaltender gives up. It's not even about save percentage. It's about making timely saves. It's about not letting up a soft goal when your team is down by one or has just scratched and clawed to get on the board. It's about making a few difficult stops with the score tied in the third period.

When a team receives consistently strong goaltending, it skates with more energy and confidence. The defensive play actually becomes more alert and, when an opposing goal is scored, the genuine attitude is, "No problem. We'll get it back and we won't give up another one." At the offensive end, the team is more dynamic in its forecheck because it doesn't have to constantly worry what will happen if the other team gets a counterattack.

On the flip side, if a team has to hold its breath every time the puck goes over their blueline -- when every opposition shot is a potential goal or dangerous rebound no matter the angle or distance -- it quickly saps energy. Nothing in hockey is as disheartening as having to battle for real estate and getting repeatedly denied by the opposing goalie and then giving up a softie in your end of the ice.

Yes, it is responsibility of every position player on the ice to do his own job as effectively as possible regardless of the play of the goaltender. Defense is everyone's responsibility, and there are times every goalie needs help with a key block, a rebound clear or a stick lift on the backcheck to prevent a surefire goal. But team D and goaltending work in syngery. When one falls apart for long enough, the other goes with it. When one truly shines, the other picks up to a level suitable for winning.

Continue: http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blog/Bill-...art-I/45/35732

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