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08-23-2011, 12:13 PM
  #12
TheJudge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Lou L fired Julien because the veteran Devils players had lost their respect for him.
The team you've put together isn't exactly a group of rookies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Given how Julien's career went in Boston and what happened to NJ in the 3 seasons afterwards - I donno, maybe coaching wasn't the team's biggest problem?
Undoubtedly coaching can only do so much. Yet Lou is among the most respected hockey minds in the NHL. If he feels that his coach did not prepare his team for the playoffs, then that's whose opinion I will take.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Also, how exactly was NJ "stacked" after the lockout, yet Tippett's teams in Dallas were "mediocre?" Tippett only coached in Phoenix for 2 seasons; he spent most of his career coaching a very solid Dallas team.
I did not say that Dallas had a mediocre team. I said Phoenix was (is) a mediocre team, and he caused them to play above the sum of their roster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Again, it's not necessarily Tippett's fault they lost, but the idea that Julien's team in NJ was stronger than any team Tippett ever had in Dallas is ridiculous.
Once again, I did not say that NJ was stronger than Dallas. I said Julien achieved a Cup with a stronger roster (Boston of this year) than anything Tippett has had (and I stand behind that).

In regards to New Jersey, what I did say is that Julien failed to prepare a strong NJ team for the playoffs, and was fired for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Considering Boston had the second best even strength goal differential in the regular season last year (after Vancouver), I'm not concerned.

Julien's teams in Montreal and NJ did regularly finish in the bottom half in offense
Bit of an understatement. His teams boast such finishes as 20th, 16th, 20th, 27th, 24th, and 30th in GPG. Good offensive seasons are an anomaly.

I will agree that he's become a better rounded coach the last few years. However, that 30th place finish was with Boston.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Anyway, I am well aware of the circumstances. If both goalies had been to the finals once, I would have given the advantage to the goalie in the much larger league, assuming they were both major parts of the run. But that's not the case - Mowers went to the finals 3 straight years, and actually won the whole thing once. Like Lindbergh, he was considered a major reason the team did as well as it did in the playoffs. 3 great playoff performances is significantly more than what Lindbergh did in the playoffs, so much so that it transcends era.
Mowers boasts 19 playoff wins in his three playoff performances. Lindbergh put up 12 in one playoff performance. Mowers sample size is small, the playoffs he played in were short, and the number of opposing teams was lacking. It is a fallacy to say that 3 runs must be better than 1, when the three runs were significantly easier to achieve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Mowers has the best playoff record of any goalie in this draft, I think. That doesn't necessarily mean that he's going to be the best goalie in the playoffs here. I don't believe in throwing out regular season records for the ATD/MLD playoffs.

But when Mowers already had a slightly better regular season record than Lindbergh, the fact that he is also more accomplished in the playoffs serves to widen the gap between them.
65 wins in 152 starts is better than 87 wins in 157?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Lindbergh was 22 by the time he made his NHL debut and 23 when he became a full-time starter. Mowers was 24 when he made his NHL debut - a normal age for players in the smaller league. I really don't see how Lindbergh was held back by the circumstances compared to Mowers.

Doing well in the AHL in the 1980s when all the best players were in the NHL is pretty meaningless. Johnny Mowers "had a fine amateur career" according to Joe Pelletier for people care about such things.
My point about his domination of the AHL primarily relates to his reliency and compete-level. He came over to the NHL as one of the first European goalies. Despite being more talented than Philly's other goalies, he was relegated to the minors - in a foreign country were he barely spoke the language. Infact, no European goalie prior to Lindbergh had held down an NHL starting job for any notable length of time. While many people would (and did) fold and head home, he proceeded to destroy the minor leagues and force his way into NHL stardom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
How important was Lindbergh to Sweden's bronze medal in the 1980 Olympics? It appears that Sweden played 8 games, and Lindbergh saw minutes in 5 of them.
He started and played the entire game in those 5 (300 minutes). That would be the team's number 1 by most definitions.


Last edited by TheJudge: 08-23-2011 at 12:35 PM.
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