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01-30-2012, 10:16 PM
  #121
seventieslord
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Tie Domi, RW



Domi should be selected by now if for no other reason than everyone in the hockey world knows who he is. Playing as a key role player in the biggest market in the league for so long makes him a high profile player in history. On www.dropyourgloves.com, Domi has more "loves" than anyone I can see aside from Probert, and he has more "hates" than anyone but Brashear, Bertuzzi, Avery and Jarkko Ruutu. But to be fair, there is a lot more to like about Domi than just notoreity:

- He got into 1020 NHL games, that alone is pretty impressive
- He was useful enough to play 9.74 minutes per game for that long. Players who exist solely to fight typically top out around 7 minutes a game.
- He contributed to successful teams that went far, getting into 98 playoff games
- He was an excellent agitator who often drew penalties or took better players to the box with him (not just from fighting)
- He actually had well above average NHL speed
- With 333 career NHL fights, he is the all-time leader.
- Despite being 4 inches smaller than his average opponent in his career, his fight record is an impressive 166-61-74 (.674)

Domi is better than most one-dimensional goons selected to this point (Kocur, Brashear and Hunter come to mind) and his track record as a useful player is much more comparable to guys like Chris Nilan and Kevin McClelland.


Domi was a little crazy. He is remembered as a guy who could hurt his team with a penalty or suspension and while that is true, it is overblown. People remember the Samuelsson and Niedermayer incidents (and the late season Ottawa brawl of 2003) and think his whole career was like that. It wasn't. He was a good team guy.

Domi's career highlight was probably in game 6 of the Leafs' 2002 series against Ottawa in round 2. The Sens were riding the high of Daniel Alfredsson's borderline hit and ensuing goal, that led to a 3-2 series lead heading back into Ottawa. Two early goals by the Sens and the crowd was deafening. It was looking bleak, until Domi, digging for the puck in the corner with Ricard Persson, took a slight cross check in the back from the latter. I have no doubt this little tank could have stayed on his feet following this innocuous routine shove, but he instead biffed hard into the boards face first, drawing blood and earning the Leafs a 5-minute powerplay, during which they scored twice. The Leafs scored seven of the next eight goals in the series, including two on that major penalty, putting a stop to Ottawa's seemingly runaway momentum. Without Domi's selflessness and sacrifice on that play, I have no doubt that series is over in 6 games.

See:
http://offwing.com/2002/05/thanks-fo...ricard-persson
http://www.downgoesbrown.com/2009/12...of-decade.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
"Finesse"? Should that be discussed in context with this rock-hard (some might say rock-headed) right winger? Yes, because Domi played his best hockey last season.


Domi has some skills that elevate him above the level of a mere goon. He is a pretty nifty skater, and in a role as a 3rd-line checker will often be in quickly on the opposing goalie behind the net, trying to force a bad pass or a turnover. He barrels in on defensemen too (the obstruction crackdown is perfect for forecheckers like Domi). When he gets the puck, he has the presence of mind to do something useful. Ban-bang reaction plays, whether shots or passes, are his strong suit. He should't think too much. Domi has a short-range shot. He'll wallow into the activity around the crease. He is surprisingly good with his feet, and if his stick is tied up or dropped he will attempt to kick the puck to a teammate.

Short but burly, Domi is one of the most eager fighters in the NHL. He talks trash and builds up his upcoming bouts as if he were Don King, which doesn't exactly endear him to the NHL hierarchy... Domi can play with controlled aggression, but the knowledge that he can snap at any moment makes opponents leery of him, and he earns some timeand space. His key role, though, is to make his skilled teammates braver.

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