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03-04-2012, 12:05 PM
  #40
noobman
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The only thing I can think of is that the guys you ran into didn't want to bring on players who weren't around their skill level, and assumed that most locals weren't very good at hockey. In any case, to say they "Don't let Asians play" is just bigoted and racist. Don't sweat it at all... you don't want to play with guys like that anyways. You never know when one of those jerks is going to decide that you're not allowed to steal the puck off of him or dangle him because you're an Asian guy and throw a cheap shot at you.

Growing up as an Indian guy playing hockey I've dealt with a little bit of racism. I can really only cite four incidents I've encountered personally, and maybe three more I've witnessed second-hand in my ten years of playing. I started relatively late at 13 (having only started skating at age 12) and took my fair share of it right up to my final season of minor hockey. In the adult leagues I played in, I found a fair bit of diversity. Many teams had a good mix of different people from different backgrounds. Of course, you'd run into the odd team that had a few legitimately racist guys, or guys who wanted to get under your skin by playing the race card. The amusing thing is that *every time* it was a team full of white guys who you could tell grew up outside of the city. They always seemed to be the kind of delusional hockey players who thought they were 100x better than they were, and couldn't get over the fact that they weren't playing for the Stanley Cup. It's the typical case of those "never was" guys wanting to live out their childhood fantasies of being hockey players.

What I've learned is that, 99% of the time, this kind of stuff comes from people who are using it as a means to vent their frustrations about other aspects of their life. In the case of the guys you mentioned, I'm sure they were a little homesick and perhaps had a bad experience with locals. Perhaps they felt like they were being mistreated, or otherwise encountered some racism themselves being in the minority... something they really weren't used to back home, and have a jaded opinion you got to experience first hand.


Last edited by noobman: 03-04-2012 at 12:13 PM.
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