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04-18-2012, 04:04 PM
  #111
BaconStrips
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Does Boyle's Functional Training for Sports have a hockey workout? Or is there a better hockey specific workout book?

Watching his video, I agree at some point the squat becomes a low back exercise, but I'd want to learn more benefits of the single-leg squat. And again, is that for athletes constantly pushing themselves to be better/faster/stronger or for your average guy who wants to get (and stay) in shape?
He doesn't really believe much in sport specific workouts, but before he (recently) moved on to the Boston Red Sox, he was a strength and conditioning coach with the Boston College Hockey team.

Here is his view of sport specific training:


Quote:
This is the question that comes up all the time. Sounds like a great set up for a joke .

"A parent walks into a strength and conditioning facility and says…."

Well in many ways, it is a joke. On us.

Parents consistently walk into a facility and say "my son ( or daughter) plays ___________ can you design a program for ______________?"

You fill in the blank based on your area. The sport doesn't matter because the answer is always the same.

When dealing with parents I like to use logic. My first question is always something like "does a fast baseball player look any different than a fast soccer player"? Most parents will answer no. Then I say "OK, our number one goal will be to increase speed".
Quote:
Watching his video, I agree at some point the squat becomes a low back exercise, but I'd want to learn more benefits of the single-leg squat. And again, is that for athletes constantly pushing themselves to be better/faster/stronger or for your average guy who wants to get (and stay) in shape?
I would do some combination of back squat / front squat. I have recently played around with not deadlifting and just using squat variations. I love deadlifting though, so it didnt last long. You could stay with SS until you stall and then, if you really like the rep scheme, switch to front squats where you would normally back squat and low back back squats where you would normally deadlift (getting back to your initial question, this would be a great place to add trap bar deadlifts instead). However, if you do this, I recommend you build your conditioning around single leg movements and basic plyometrics. This is where "crossfit" style training comes in handy.

5 rounds/sets/whatever
12 single leg squats (each side)
24 alternating lateral jumps (Total so 12 each leg)
Run 400m (or less, depending on your conditioning)
Rest 1 minute (somedays you wouldn't include rest, other days it would be longer).

I would also make sure your warmup routine includes 1 dynamic stretch, 1 static stretch and some ab stuff. To make it fun, you could do it for time as well:

Run for 10-15 minutes or skip 8-12 minutes (less if you get super warm skipping) then blast through something like:

5 times through of
30 second plank or hollow hold
broad jumps or high box jumps
Quad or hamstring stretch

Thus, you continue with starting strength but are doing injury prevention before and after. More importantly, either workout can be modified so it can be done without workout equipment. You can do your conditioning in 20 minutes while waiting for a roast to cook.

Edit: I don't think you need to worry about aggressive pursuing a progressive plyometric program, just don't start out doing depth jumps or something crazy. Keep it to 2-3 times a week initially and focus on simple exercises. You can always sub in a core exercise for plyometrics. As you gain confidence, start slowly adding more.

Some basic movements I like:
Alternating Lunge Jumps
Skipping (try and master the "double under" once you have a rope)
Static Lunge Jumps
Squat Jumps
Controlled Box Jumps
Tuck Jumps
Laundry Jumps

More advanced things include
Hurdles
Depth Jumps

Don't neglect the upper body either, plyo pushups are pretty much the bees knees. You can also build a medicine ball out of an old basketball.


Last edited by BaconStrips: 04-18-2012 at 04:16 PM.
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