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05-07-2012, 11:51 PM
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Hockey Outsider
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Career Save Percentage - minimum 1,000 adjusted shots

* This table is now updated for 2016

GoalieShotsSavesSP%
Tim Thomas 1526 1409 92.4%
Braden Holtby 1422 1313 92.3%
Olaf Kolzig 1446 1330 92%
Tuukka Rask 1459 1342 92%
Patrick Roy* 7218 6638 92%
John Vanbiesbrouck 2030 1865 91.9%
Ken Wregget 1767 1622 91.8%
Dominik Hasek 3422 3140 91.7%
Ed Belfour* 4641 4256 91.7%
Jean-Sebastien Giguere 1546 1416 91.6%
Kirk McLean 2099 1918 91.4%
Patrick Lalime 1105 1010 91.4%
Cam Ward 1137 1038 91.3%
Dwayne Roloson 1478 1348 91.2%
Felix Potvin 2186 1992 91.1%
Curtis Joseph 4044 3685 91.1%
Martin Brodeur 5439 4953 91.1%
Grant Fuhr* 3966 3610 91%
Jonathan Quick 2322 2113 91%
Mike Liut 1064 968 91%
Henrik Lundqvist 3358 3054 91%
Mike Richter 2182 1985 91%
Miikka Kiprusoff 1679 1527 90.9%
Bill Ranford 1536 1396 90.9%
Tom Barrasso 3521 3197 90.8%
Roberto Luongo 2087 1895 90.8%
Ryan Miller 1697 1540 90.7%
Chris Osgood 3246 2943 90.7%
Corey Crawford 2403 2178 90.6%
Jimmy Howard 1424 1291 90.6%
Nikolai Khabibulin 2155 1951 90.5%
Ron Hextall 2632 2382 90.5%
Reggie Lemelin 1147 1036 90.3%
Marty Turco 1345 1215 90.3%
Kelly Hrudey 2531 2286 90.3%
Sean Burke 1101 993 90.2%
Greg Millen 1336 1205 90.2%
Brian Boucher 1069 964 90.2%
Don Beaupre 1538 1386 90.1%
Carey Price 1529 1378 90.1%
Mike Vernon 3493 3146 90.1%
Jose Theodore 1730 1559 90.1%
Jon Casey 1789 1611 90.1%
Pekka Rinne 1392 1252 90%
Andy Moog 2655 2385 89.8%
Evgeni Nabokov 2314 2077 89.7%
Ilya Bryzgalov 1304 1169 89.7%
Arturs Irbe 1513 1357 89.6%
Marc-Andre Fleury 2737 2452 89.6%
Antti Niemi 1808 1618 89.5%
Ray Emery 1051 937 89.2%

This table shows why it's critically important to take the era into consideration when evaluating goalies' playoff performances. For example, Grant Fuhr posted a seemingly unimpressive 89.9% save percentage between 1984 and 1988, when he helped the Oilers win four Stanley Cups in five years. Adjusted for era, Fuhr stopped 91.8% of the shots he faced during those four seasons. That's not quite elite, but it's a very strong performance over a large sample size (79). That doesn't even take into account the strong likelihood that Fuhr faced tougher quality shots than average due to playing on a run-and-gun team.

Keep in mind that career save percentage is, by definition, a career average. Tom Barrasso had a few rough playoffs at the start and end of his career, and that dragged down his average. His career average of 90.8% is barely above average; if one focuses on his prime from 1988 to 1996, Barrasso's save percentage rises to a very strong 91.6%.

Patrick Roy is tied for the third highest career save percentage out of any goalie who faced at least 1,000 shots (Roy faced more than twice as many shots as Thomas and Holtby combined). He's also faced 33% more shots than the next closest goalie (Brodeur). No goalie during the past thirty years has surpassed (or even approached) Roy's combination of an extremely high level of performance, and longevity.

Osgood is slightly above average at stopping the puck. I think the Hall of Fame should be a balance between ability and accomplishments. Osgood has is consistent and durable, but is only slightly above average ability. In my opinion, he shouldn’t get a spot in the Hall due to having the fortune of spending most of his career playing behind the best franchise of the past two decades.

Update for 2012: Fleury has the second-worst adjusted save percentage after a number of horrific games in the spring. Thomas' save percentage drops slightly, but he still has the highest adjusted playoff save percentage 1983-present (minimum 1,000 shots).

Update for 2013: We all know how game six of the Stanley Cup finals ended, but Rask still had a phenomenal postseason. He has the 4th best playoff save percentage of all-time. Quick has now faced enough shots to qualify for the list and based on the threshold (minimum 1,000 shots), he has the T-8th best save percentage of all-time. Lundqvist moves up slightly but is still well below his regular season performance. Fleury drops further and now has the worst adjusted save percentage of all-time.

Update for 2014: Quick and Lundqvist duelled in the Stanley Cup finals and now rank 14th and 15th in career adjusted save percentage. If we increase the threshold to 2,000 adjusted shots, they rank 6th and 7th. Fleury has a decent spring, but still ranks last (minimum 2,000 adjusted shots).

Update for 2015: Crawford wins a second Stanley Cup this year, but his career save percentage is virtually unchanged (slightly above average). Lundqvist had a great spring. He now ranks in the top ten in shots faced (of those, only Roy, Hasek and Belfour have a better save percentage). Holtby was incredible (despite a second round loss) and now has the 2nd highest playoff save percentage of all time (although he barely meets the 1,000 shot threshold).

Updated for 2016: with another strong performance, Braden Holtby now has the second highest save percentage all-time. Lundqvist had a tough spring and his numbers decline somewhat (though he's still well above average).


Last edited by Hockey Outsider: 06-20-2016 at 05:18 PM.
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