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06-03-2012, 01:10 AM
  #281
Dreakmur
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Jack Walker !!!


Awards and Achievements:
3 x Stanley Cup Champion (1914, 1917, 1925)
7 x Stanley Cup Finalist (1911, 1914, 1917, 1919, 1920, 1925, 1926)
Retro Conn Smythe Winner (1925)

3 x P.C.H.A. First Team All-Star (1921, 1922, 1924)
3 x P.C.H.A. Second Team All-Star (1917, 1919, 1920)

2 x P.C.H.L. MVP (1930, 1931)


Scoring Achievements:
NHA Points – 4th(1914)
NHA Goals – 9th(1914)
NHA Assists – 1st(1914), 8th(1915)

Western Points – 4th(1924), 8th(1923), 9th(1916), 9th(1919), 10th(1917)
Western Goals – 4th(1924), 7th(1916), 9th(1923)
Western Assists – 3rd(1917), 4th(1919), 4th(1920), 7th(1923), 8th(1916), 8th(1922), 8th(1926), 9th(1925)


PCHL Assists – 1st(1930), 1st(1931)
(this PCHL was a minor league)

Play-off Points – 1st(1914), 1st(1925), 3rd(1920) 4th(1911), 5th(1917), 5th(1919)
Play-off Goals – 1st(1914), 1st(1925), 4th(1911), 5th(1920)


Consolidated Scoring Achievements:
Consolidated Points – 5th(1914), 14th(1919), 18th(1924), 19th(1916)
Consolidated Goals – 14th(1914), 15th(1924), 16th(1916)
Consolidated Assists – 2nd(1914), 6th(1919), 9th(1920), 10th(1915), 11th(1917), 17th(1926), 18th(1923)


Consolidated Scoring Percentages:
Points – 82(1914), 72(1924), 54(1916), 52(1915), 49(1923), 48(1919), 40(1920), 40(1926)

Best 6 Seasons: 357


Team Scoring:
Points – 1st(1914), 1st(1924), 2nd(1916), 2nd(1925), 2nd(1926), 3rd(1917), 4th(1915), 4th(1919), 4th(1920), 4th(1921), 4th(1922), 4th(1923)
Goals – 1st(1924), 2nd(1914), 2nd(1916), 2nd(1926), 3rd(1915), 4th(1917), 4th(1919), 4th(1920), 4th(1921), 4th(1922), 4th(1923), 4th(1925)
Assists – 1st(1914), 1st(1919), 1st(1920), 1st(1923), 1st(1926), 2nd(1916), 2nd(1917), 2nd(1924), 2nd(1925), 3rd(1915), 3rd(1922), 4th(1921)

Based on the scoring totals, Walker was only an offensive dud from 1919 to 1922. 1923, he was 4th, but just a few points behind the leader.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey – Player Biography
When an unknown hockey team from Port Arthur took a 13-4 drubbing from the Ottawa Senators in a 1911 challenge, people talked about the outstanding hook-checking of Port Arthur forward Jack Walker. The neat little guy eventually cracked the professional ranks, playing 16 seasons as a world-class hockeyist.

….

Walker joined the Victoria Cougars for 1924-25 and figured in yet another Stanley Cup, scoring four goals and two assists in four contests against Howie Morenz and his Montreal Canadiens. In that series, Walker shut down Morenz entirely.

When the WCHL folded in 1926, Walker’s rights were transferred to the Detroit Cougars. He would play a leadership role in Detroit…

….

During his playing days and later as a coach, Walker spent hours helping rookies, teaching them the art of the hook-check. Walker was as good at poke-checking as Frank Nighbor was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup; Vol. 1 – Player Biography
Port Arthur took a bad drubbing from Ottawa when they challenged for the Stanley Cup in 1911 and little was reported about the Port Arthur team. However, mention was made of an outstanding hook check displayed by one of their forwards, Jack Walker. This fine player is best remembered for his uncanny skill as a hook check artist and in this respect he was a rival of Frank Nighbor.

… although never a great scorer he was the star backchecker

… the famed line of Morenz, Joliat and Boucher found Walker and his hookcheck the stumbling block. The veteran broke up their attacks time after time and scored four goals in the series and the Cougars won the Cup…

This small clean-playing but aggressive played was on seven championship teams…
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Great Game: The Forgotten Leafs and The Rise of Professional Hockey
Nighbor, though a solid young forward throughout the previous season, had been lured away to British Columbia.

The loss of Nighbor was more than compensated for by the return of Jack Walker.

....

... the Blue Shirts were not wedded to old theories about complex patters of "combination" offense. They kept their passes short and sparse. They were fast, but they used their speed as much for checking as for attack. Their forwards bore directly in on the net, rarely circling in mid-ice. They harassed ad hit the opposition relentlessly, keying on its main men. And they were not afraid to take penalties as long as they were a consequence of tough, hard work.

The team also had magnificent balance - great stars and solid role players. Holmes kept maturing as a reliable, consistent goaltender. Cameron was the flashy, rushing defenseman. In Davidson there was a power forward and with Foyston a quiet, classy centre. Walker was simply sensational as both an offensive threat and a persistent forechecker. For reliable relief, the team could call on Wilson as a utility man.

Then there was McGiffen.

....

Toronto was finally on top. Its club not only was the best, but seemed as complete as a team could be. A local panel picked Jack Walker as the most valuable man over the season. Frank Foyston was judged the star of the final series.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey – In a Flash
Jack Walker was for many years the best defensive forward in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, perhaps in all of hockey.

….

Jack Walker shut down many top gun with his jabbing poke-checks and sweeping hooks. Lalonde, Pitre, Morenz, Joliat… the “Old Fox” had their number.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey – Go West, Young Cup
Jack Walker, at 36, proved himself as effective two-way force for Victoria. His second goal of the contest turned out to be the winner.

….

Again, Montreal came out as flat as week-old ginger ale. Walker set the tone with a highlight-reel goal

….

On a power play, Walker sealed the deal for Victoria. Between his masterful poke-checking, Gordon Fraser’s solid defending, and Hap Holmes’ 27 saves, Montreal had no chance.

….

As in the three previous games, Walker’s two-way work was sparkling.

Montreal was shut down wholesale. The western boys short-circuited not only Joliat and Boucher, but also the fabulous Morenz. Though Morenz, also known as the “Mitchell Meteor”, notched four brilliant goals in the series, his play was weak at crucial points I the four-game set. This had much to do with the work of Walker and Frederickson. Walker had a poke-check equal to that of the Senators’ star Frank Nighbor
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup; Vol. 1 – 1911 Play-offs
Jack Walker was the best of the Ports, displaying an outstanding hook check.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup; Vol. 1 – 1914 Play-offs
Jack Walker was the star with three goals and his hook check working to perfection
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup; Vol. 1 – 1920 Play-offs
…the hook check of Jack Walker time and again broke up the Vancouver attacks.

….

It was hard to judge who had the best hook check between Frank Nighbor and Jack Walker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup; Vol. 1 – 1925 Play-offs
The star was the veteran Jack Walker both with his great backchecking and offensive play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
The Lakehead region of Ontario has produced many fine hockey players over the years, not the least of which is Jack Walker, the man credited with introducing the hook check to hockey.

….

In 1924-25, Seattle dropped out of the PCHA, leaving the league with franchises in Vancouver and Victoria. These two clubs joined the Western Canada Hockey League and Walker signed with the Victoria Cougars on November 10, 1924. He led the league in penalty minutes with the modest total of 14, in 28 games played that season. More importantly, however, the Cougars went on to win the Stanley Cup when they defeated the Montreal Canadiens three games to one in the spring of 1925. The Cougars were the last non-NHL team to win the Cup. Walker had now won the Stanley Cup three times with three different teams in three different leagues.
Walker finished out his major pro career in Detroit as a member of the NHL Cougars after the Victoria franchise moved to Detroit prior to the 1926-27 season. After two years in the NHL, he returned West to Seattle to play three years with the Seattle Eskimos of the PCHL and for his outstanding play he was awarded the Muldoon Trophy as most valuable player in the league. After retiring, he stayed on the West Coast, coaching and instructing youngsters and pros alike in the art of the hook check, settling finally in Seattle, where the city had claimed him as one of its own.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Hall of Fame – 1925 Retro Conn Smythe
Led Victoria shooters with four goals and five points in the final. Had the game-winning goal in game one and two goals in game two. Had the first goal in each of the first two games and four unassisted tallies. He also had goals in each of the four league playoff games to reach the finals. Great sweep-check also limited the Canadiens scoring chances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elmer Ferguson
Players like Walker, Frank Patrick, Hooley Smith and Pit Lepine would coast around centre ice when the opposing team attacked, crouch to one knee, reach their stick as far as possible along the ice, and hook or poke the puck smoothly and efficiently off an opponent’s stick. Timing and judgement of distance played a great part, of course, in successful operation of the play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lester Patrick
Jack Walker, who made the hook check famous, was one of the greatest players who ever lived and not far short of the brainiest I ever knew, but somehow, no matter how brilliant he was, he didn’t bring the crowd to their feet. He lacked color.

7 x Retro Selke Winner (1914, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1920, 1924, 1925)

Ultimate Hockey’s “Best Defensive Forward” of the 1910s.
Ultimate Hockey’s “Best Shadow” of the 1910s.






Quote:
Originally Posted by The Toronto World – January 8th, 1914
The hockey fans were treated to some real hockey last night at the Arena when the Ontarios and Torontos hooked up for the first time. The Blue Shirts were always best and smothered the Murphyites with their speed and back checking, having it 9 to 3 at the finish.

There was something doing every minute and the grand passing and fast skating by the Torontos was pretty to watch.

The Orange and Green outfit were never in the hunt after the first few minutes and seemed lost in the killing pace. Jack Walker stopped the Ontario frontline nine times out of ten with his peculiar check.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Daily – March 18th, 1914
It is surely an honor to Jack Walker to be chosen as the most popular of the champion hockey team and to get a free trip to Merlin Springs, Texas; where both the Giants and Toronto Internationals are in training. The choice was well made for Walker in not only one of the cleverest of the Blue Shirts, but also the most reliable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press – December 9th, 1927
Jack Walker of the Detroit Cougars, a thoughtful, brainy type of player, is generally credited with being the inventor of the poke check. He developed this system of purloining the puck from opposing forwards 20 years ago, while a member of the Port Arthur, Ont., amateur club, and out on the coast he taught it to Frank Nighbor, brilliant veteran forward of the Ottawa club. Nighbor, a player of precisely the same mental and physical type as Walker, developed and improved on Walker's basic idea of sweeping his stick along the ice to foremost exponent of a style of play that is now used by scores of forwards, though Nighbor is still one of the most skillful poke-checkers in sport.

Walker, slightly bald, but still gifted with great speed, skill in puck-juggling and a wicked shot, is a fine hockey player today after 20 years at least in senior amateur and professional ranks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sunday Sun – October 26th, 1928
Jack Walker, now with Detroit, who is anxious to return to the coast, where for so many seasons he was a bright and shining figure on the steel blades.

Every sport has heroes…

Cyclone Taylor was that type of player in hockey and so is Jack Walker
, the fox who played regularly in the N.H.L. all last season. Like his equally famous colleagues, Walker lives cleanly, doesn’t smoke or go in for elbow bending, and when he makes friends they stay that way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Emonton Journal – February 21st, 1950
Walker, born in Port Arthur, rated as one of hockey’s great passers and was hailed as the originator of the hook check.

Offensive Abilities
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun – December 23rd, 1914
Jack Walker is showing his old time form with the Torontos. If he keeps up his present speed he will make all the forwards sit up and take notice in the N.H.A.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spokesman Review – January 17th, 1917
Against the Rose City seven the Mets tallied six goals and previous to this encounter they ran up a total of 12 goals on the Vancouver team. In both of these contests the work of Bernie Morris and Jack Walker was sensational.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal – March 27th, 1919
At the opening of the second period play continued about even, with the puck first at one end then the other. Jack Walker’s wizardly stickhandling featured the start.

….

Jack Walker seemed to solve the outer defense of the Flying Frenchmen, for several times he dodged the entire field only to lose the puck at the goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – January 20th, 1923
The Mets have the passing game down to the highest degree and the team work of the forwards, especially Walker, Foyston and Morris was bewildering.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – February 19th, 1925
Jack Walker tricked Lehman for the first goal by finding an opening at the right of the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald – March 17th, 1925
In the third period, Jack Walker, the vulpine veteran, hoisted a tar washer to the lattice from ten feet inside the blue line, beating Winkler as defensemen obstructed his view.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – March 19th, 1925
Then Walker riveted home a hot shot on a pass from Fredrickson three minutes before the close of the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press – December 9th, 1927
Walker, slightly bald, but still gifted with great speed, skill in puck-juggling and a wicked shot, is a fine hockey player today after 20 years at least in senior amateur and professional ranks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun – December 6th, 1930
Jack Walker is the key man, the ‘feeder’ of the goal hunters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun – December 9th, 1930
Jack Walker was a big seal hunter for the Igloo dwellers. He started play after play and his forward passes were perfection itself.

Physical Game
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal – March 27th, 1919
“Bad Joe” Hall they call him back east, and the Seattle spectators will admit that he is well named. Two Seattle players are nursing injured ankles from Hall’s wicked stick; Jack Walker had three stitches taken above his eye as a result of Hall’s lunges…

….

Jack Walker went down and out with a bad cut to his head Wilson replaced him….Walker was back on the ice with a big patch over his right eye. He replaced Rowe.

….

Walker was ruled off for bodychecking…

Defensive Play
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette – January 8th, 1914
Walker played a wonderful game, and is certainly the best hockey player seen around here in a long time. He is superior to Nighbor, who was considered the best left wing player in the National Hockey Association last season. He scored three goals and assisted in several others.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – November 13th, 1915
Walker learned the popular winter game in Port Arthur, and is the originator of the poke check, which is a great feature in back-checking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – March 19th, 1917
In purely defensive play, Jack Walker with his clever hook check was the Seattle star. Walker took the puck away from the best stickhandlers the Flying Frenchmen could produce as easily as taking off his hat and it was his work that spilled most of the offensive rushes of the Canadiens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saskatoon Phoenix – March 21st, 1917
The local lads went after Pitre early in the game and after Jack Walker worked his little pet check on the “Bullet” for about five minutes, Pitre was through for the night.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal – March 27th, 1919
Jack Walker drew applause for his nifty checking. He took the puck from Cleghorn after the latter had carried it the length of the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader – March 22nd, 1919
Jack Walker and Cully Wilson led in Seattle peppery defense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saskatoon Phoenix – March 22nd, 1920
It has been understood that Seattle would use the great Jack Walker as centre against Frank Nighbor, but Muldoon intimated that Frank Foyston would hold down the mid-ice position tomorrow and that Walker would switch to right wing. This would bring Darragh and Walker together.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun – October 19th, 1922
Jack Walker’s tantalizing hook check will fuss the opposing forwards as of yore…
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ottawa Citizen – January 26th, 1946
…this is the man (Nighbor) who was the greatest of all defensive centers with sweep-checking Jack Walker his own rival in the art.

….

Pivoting those youthful wingers was Jack Walker, the original sweep-checker and the pride of old Port Arthur.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saskatoon Star-Phoenix – March 2nd, 1950
When Jack Walker, one of the hockey greats of a quarter century ago, died in Seattle last month, it was remembered that he was the originator of the now-vanished poke check. But few recall that he was the central figure in the most daring wholesale player raid ever executed in the history of the professional game.

….

The poke or hook check which Walker was the first to try would be of no use today, says Fergy, but it was a potent weapon in the no-forward-passing game of the time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun – January 12th, 1952
the greatest poke-cheker of them all, Jack Walker….

Jack Walker a star?
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press – December 9th, 1927
Jack Walker of the Detroit Cougars, a thoughtful, brainy type of player, is generally credited with being the inventor of the poke check. He developed this system of purloining the puck from opposing forwards 20 years ago, while a member of the Port Arthur, Ont., amateur club, and out on the coast he taught it to Frank Nighbor, brilliant veteran forward of the Ottawa club. Nighbor, a player of precisely the same mental and physical type as Walker, developed and improved on Walker's basic idea of sweeping his stick along the ice to foremost exponent of a style of play that is now used by scores of forwards, though Nighbor is still one of the most skillful poke-checkers in sport.

Walker, slightly bald, but still gifted with great speed, skill in puck-juggling and a wicked shot, is a fine hockey player today after 20 years at least in senior amateur and professional ranks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Daily – March 18th, 1914
It is surely an honor to Jack Walker to be chosen as the most popular of the champion hockey team and to get a free trip to Merlin Springs, Texas; where both the Giants and Toronto Internationals are in training. The choice was well made for Walker is not only one of the cleverest of the Blue Shirts, but also the most reliable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle Hockey Hall of Fame
When Walker learned of the construction of the new Civic Arena in Seattle and the founding of a new league there in 1928, he obtained his release from Detroit and joined the Seattle Eskimos, managed by his old coach Pete Muldoon. Though he was now 40-years-old and arguably past his prime, Jack was an old fan favorite and a good drawing card in the early days of the new team. While he didn't score a lot of goals, he did lead the league in assists twice and continued to play good, competitive hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen – May 3rd, 1927
Jack Walker, veteran center-ice player with Detroit Cougars during the past season, has been judged the most popular player on the Detroit team, which is not surprising.

Walker, like Frank Nighbor of the champion Senators, is a type of player that plays the puck and not the man. Like Nighbor, he is poke-check expert, and also like the famous Senator star, he is a clean-living athlete and a credit to the game in which he has been a prominent figure for fifteen years.

Hockey owes much to players like Jack Walker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald – March 31st, 1920
Foyston and Walker were the individual stars of the game and they drew many cheers for their flashy work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sunday Sun – October 26th, 1928
When the Pacific Coast league came into being in Seattle a few days ago, the various club managers agreed…that no former players connected with the PCHA or with the WCL would be sought.

One exception was made, one only. That was Jack Walker, now with Detroit, who is anxious to return to the coast, where for so many seasons he was a bright and shining figure on the steel blades.

Every sport has its heroes and in most of the athletic avenues down the ages there have been figures that stood out for the best in sportsmanship like Walter Johnson of Washington, Willie Hoppe in billiards, or Tommy Gibbons among the Queensberry Quarrelers.

Cyclone Taylor was that type in hockey, and so is Jack Walker, the fox who played regularly in the NHL all last season.



Last edited by Dreakmur: 02-12-2017 at 04:04 PM.
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