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06-28-2012, 07:46 AM
  #19
Inner Turbulence
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herby View Post
Sure it is. Your bringing in a player on the wrong side of his 30's, and just using Ziggy's example, paying him a large sum of money to play hockey for 3 years. In Smyth's case it was 18.75 million, in Doan's it would be 15.




He sucked each season here after December. And did his veteran leadership ring through when he demanded a trade because his icetime was going to be cut and his next salary affected? And then on top of it lied to the fans, and went to EDM and said how it was nice to be back in a hockey market. ya he was a real positive force.



How can you honestly type that.

Did you enjoy the Stanley Cup run?
Did you enjoy the parade?

None of that happens if Smyth plays out the full three years like Lombardi intended when he originally made the trade. Anytime you make a trade that would have cost your team a championship that is a mistake, a blunder, whatever you want to call it. Trading for Smyth and then committing almost 20 million in valuable cap space for him over three years was a disaster. I'm happy Smyth's greed made it a two year disaster instead of a three year won and we were able to win the cup, but it was still a disaster.

Smyth is here, no Carter and certainly no Fraser. One guy was the glue guy on the 4th line, the other scored the biggest goal in team history.




This is BS.

Just like Smyth a player who rarely crossed into the defensive zone supposedly made Kopitar into a two-way force.

How could a player who couldn't even make it up and down the ice at the end of the season influence the playoff runs of Brown and Kopitar, it's a load of trash. It would be like giving LaBarbera credit for Quick's development or saying Peter Harrold made Drew Doughty the player he is today. Make sense? Neither does your comment.



$6.25 million for fourth in scoring and no shows after December every season isn't that bad?

Look, it's not even the two years I'm talking about. It was clearly the third year that made/would have made the Smyth deal one of the biggest blunders in team history. Because none of this magical run happens with him and his bloated cap hit and lack of production on the roster. That is why I am concerned with giving Doan a multi-year deal for $5 million. If he pulls a Smyth and sucks, or doesn't fit in for whatever reason, it handcuffs the Kings ability to make needed moves to improve the team.

They just had an epic run, keep the team together, reward Penner with a fair contract and give it another shot. Don't overpay for a guy on the wrong side of 35 who may or may not have issues with some of our core players.

The risk far outweighs the reward on this one. Just like it did on the Smyth deal.

Dean has said he learned from his blunders, I believe him and don't think he touches Doan unless its on a one year deal.
Herby,

It is a hypothetical situation that you are looking at there. And the premise that Carter would not have been acquired if Smyth was still there is pure speculation. Salary wise Carter would still be affordable at the deadline. The Kings were only on the hook for about 1 million dollars of Carters salary this past season – and most of that would have been offset by the departure of Jack Johnson. It was pretty much a wash salary wise.

IF you want to make the assumption of what would happen if Smyth had still been a King past the summer of I think the more likely scenario would be No Simon Gagne last summer. Since that is pretty much that vacant Left Wing spot that the Kings filled by signing Gagne. And, pure speculation again, but since the team would be different and the dynamics would be different with Smyth on the team – maybe the team doesn’t go into the months-long scoring funks. Maybe Murray doesn’t get fired. Maybe the Kings still acquire Carter. Maybe the Kings win the cup anyway. The team was moving in the right direction. On paper at least.

If memory serves (but it rarely does), I seem to recall that even before Smyth requested a trade to Edmonton there was talk about trading, waiving or possibly buying out Smyth. For salary cap reasons. So he might have been gone – one way or the other – anyway. Maybe it was all fan-speculation though.

If we have to go down ”Speculation Road” who knows what would have happened if the Kings did not acquire Smyth in the first place. Maybe the 2010 season doesn’t happen, the Kings dont make the playoffs. The Kids don’t learn how to win consistently, Lombardi is fired, the next GM decides to start from scratch and trades away Kopitar … and the whole ”rebuild” goes a different direction …

In the end, we can’t know what would have happened. But what we do know is – the Los Angeles Kings won the damn Stanley Cup !!!. And I think winning the Stanley Cup absolves the General Manager from just about every bad move he has made. Since, the moves have been a part of the path that lead the team to the finals and glory. Every twist and turn, bumps in the road is a part of the journey. And if you dont hit those bumps or makes an odd turn – maybe things happen differently somewhere down the line which would possibly lead the team in a very different direction to a different place. I always liked how Lombardi did the rebuild, accumulated assets. I had my doubts if he was the right man to push the team over the top. Mike Richards gave me faith that he DID have the balls to make the big move. I wasn't wild about the Carter move, and I actually dont think that line played consistently well. Too many chances against. But in the end it was all worth it. The Stanley Cup.

For me, what it boils down to, it doesn’t matter HOW they got here. The important thing is they actually got there. The Stanley Cup.

No need to wallow in past mistakes. Or even theoretical ones.

Did I mention, the Stanley Cup ? Smile and be happy


Last edited by Inner Turbulence: 06-28-2012 at 09:00 AM.
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