View Single Post
Old
08-04-2012, 12:36 AM
  #8
Fanned On It
Registered User
 
Fanned On It's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 1,879
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
In my opinion, the first step in learning the wrist shot is the mechanics and being able to load your stick, generate power, and maintain your balance.

You start to learn those three things from a "perfect" position at first, then start moving in to the shot.

Finally, once you can comfortably shoot in motion, start shooting from all angles and locations.

In practice, you almost never shoot from a "perfect" position, but off the rush, from the boards, even from the goal crease trying to chip it in (good to practice that as well).

The more situations you practice, the more you will execute without thinking in a game situation, which is critical for success.

Here's my video about the basics of wrist shots FWIW. I learned to shoot by learning these fundamentals off ice from a stand still, then walking in to the shot, then performing on ice, and finally shooting from all angles and locations.

Good video Jarick, but every time I see it I just feel like I have to say that what stick flex you use shouldn't be completely dependent on your height OR weight. If I just went ahead and did what this video told me, I would be using at least an 85 flex because I'm 6'2", which is actually too stiff for me. I'm a pretty light-weight guy (only 165 lbs) so I have to go with something a little more whippier in a 70/75 flex. You really have to take into account how strong you are and how much weight you actually put into your shots.

Not disrespecting Jarick's video because he has a lot of good stuff in there, just trying to clear up something that might have seemed a little misleading in the video.

Fanned On It is offline   Reply With Quote