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09-03-2012, 08:36 PM
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tarheelhockey
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The Winston-Salem Polar Twins select


Dave Ellett, D




Ellett's double-OT goal in 1990 was the most important of his career and perhaps the most important in the Jets' NHL history.


Position: D
Handed: L
Height: 6'2"
Weight: 205lb
Born: Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Nationality: Canadian


Awards
CCHA Second All-Star Team (1984)
NCAA Championship All-Tournament Team (1984)
World Championship Silver Medal (1989)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1989, 1992)


Regular Season
Season Tm GP G A PTS PIM
1984-85 WIN 8 1 5 6 4
1985-86 WIN 3 0 1 1 0
1986-87 WIN 10 0 8 8 2
1987-88 WIN 5 1 2 3 10
1989-90 WIN 7 2 0 2 6
1992-93 TOR 21 4 8 12 8
1993-94 TOR 18 3 15 18 31
1994-95 TOR 7 0 2 2 0
1995-96 TOR 6 0 0 0 4
1996-97 NJD 10 0 3 3 10
1997-98 BOS 6 0 1 1 6
1998-99 BOS 8 0 0 0 4
1999-00 STL NHL 7 0 1 1
Career NHL 116 11 46 57 87


NHL Playoffs
Season Team GP G A Pts PIM
1984-85 WIN 8 1 5 6 4
1985-86 WIN 3 0 1 1 0
1986-87 WIN 10 0 8 8 2
1987-88 WIN 5 1 2 3 10
1989-90 WIN 7 2 0 2 6
1992-93 TOR 21 4 8 12 8
1993-94 TOR 18 3 15 18 31
1994-95 TOR 7 0 2 2 0
1995-96 TOR 6 0 0 0 4
1996-97 NJD 10 0 3 3 10
1997-98 BOS 6 0 1 1 6
1998-99 BOS 8 0 0 0 4
1999-00 STL 7 0 1 1 2
Career NHL 116 11 46 57 87


Defensemen Goal scoring, 1984-85 to 1991-92
Rank PlayerGPGoals
3Al MacInnis611162
4Ray Bourque695158
5Dave Ellett614121
6Doug Wilson484121
7Larry Murphy 623116


- One of 6 defensemen to break 40 points every year from 1984-85 to 1993-94
- On the 1991-92 Maple Leafs, Ellett was 2nd to Glenn Anderson in points, 3rd to Anderson and Wendel Clark in goals, and t-2nd to Doug Gilmour in assists.
- Led his team in defenseman scoring on 4 occasions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
When Ellett joined the Jets in 1984, he was a solid defenseman right away, scoring 38 points and garnering a +20 plus/minus rating. He became part of a solid Jets nucleus in the mid-to-late 80's that had the misfortune of playing in the same division as the dominant Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames. As a result, Ellett did not garner very much late-round playoff experience with the Jets.

Ellett's most notable moment with the Jets came in the 1990 Smythe Division semi-final series against the Edmonton Oilers. With the game tied at 2-2 in the second overtime period, Ellett scored a power play goal to give the Jets the win and a 3-1 series lead. Despite losing the next 3 games to the Oilers, this goal is considered the most memorable goal in the Jets' NHL history.

In the middle of the 1990–91 season, Ellett was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs with Paul Fenton for Ed Olczyk and Mark Osborne. It was with the Leafs that Ellett transitioned from an offensive defenseman into a solid two-way rearguard. He was an integral part to the Leafs clubs of 1993 and 1994 that reached the Conference Finals.
...
In 1989 Ellett was the subject of controversy when he decided to play for Team Canada in the World Championships. Bob Johnson, coach of the American team, complained that Ellett had to play for the United States because of his birthplace and because he attended Team USA's training camp for the 1987 Canada Cup. But in actuality, Ellett was allowed to play for Team Canada because he never actually played for the USA internationally.

Ellett was part of one of Wayne Gretzky's most-remembered goals. In Game 7 of the 1993 Campbell Conference Finals between the Leafs and the Los Angeles Kings, Gretzky scored a hat trick. He scored his third goal from behind the net by banking it off Ellett's skate and past the Toronto goaltender, Félix Potvin. Ellett returned the favor by scoring for Toronto with just over a minute remaining, but Los Angeles hung on to win the game and go to the Stanley Cup Finals against Montreal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
During six full seasons in Winnipeg, Ellett was tremendously resilient, appearing in no fewer than 68 games each season and dressing for at least 75 games on five occasions.
...
Early in 1990-91, Ellett was sent to the Toronto Maple Leafs where he would spend the better part of seven years. The Leafs put together two solid runs at the Stanley Cup in 1993 and 1994 with the likes of Ellett, Doug Gilmour, and Jamie Macoun providing some much-needed leadership. Both years the Leafs advanced to the Conference finals, only to be turned back. In the 1994 playoffs, Ellett averaged a point per game in 18 post-season contests.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Dave Ellett was a very skilled finesse player. Skating was his prime asset. He was an excellent skater, blessed with very good speed and quickness, and fine agility. His mobility allowed him to dictate the play at either blue line. His transition game was great because he could effortlessly turn the play around at the defensive blue line.

His puck ability was also top notch, and that shone through on the power play, which is where Ellett established himself as one of the NHL's top players. He could control the point with great comfort, holding the line and pinching in with great efficiency. He was a key player in establishing the offensive zone. He was an under-rated puck rusher and a good break out playmaker. He also had a very good shot, and the smarts to keep it low and hard to create opportunities for deflections and rebounds.

As good as he was offensively, Ellett struggled at times defensively. He had good size and decent strength, and he used those skills in efficient manner rather than any vociferous way. He became good at establishing body position but could be outmuscled in the corners. His lack of noticeable physicality became a criticism point from his detractors in Winnipeg, accusing him of be unenthusiastic defensively at times. From time to time he was also guilty of playing the puck instead of the man on one-on-one breaks against him, resulting in a few memorable blow-bys.

Ellett was one of those players who was very valuable, but not necessarily very memorable. He never posted an incredible season or more importantly a string of playoff success. His very nature and his key to success was to remain solid and efficient, not spectacular.
...
Ellett would play 7 seasons in T.O. He was a very important veteran presence in two deep Toronto playoff runs.
Injuries
From hockeydraftcentral.com
Broke nose in fight with Alan Kerr during Winnipeg's Jan. 27, 1987, game at N.Y. Islanders.
Missed part of 1987-88 season with bruised thigh, an injury suffered during Winnipeg's March 5, 1988, game at Toronto. He did not return to action until Winnipeg's March 29, 1988, game at Vancouver.
Missed part of 1988-89 season with sprained ankle, an injury suffered during Winnipeg's Nov. 16, 1988, game vs. Chicago.
Missed part of 1992-93 season with separated shoulder, an injury suffered during Toronto's March 9, 1993, game at Washington. He did not return to action until Toronto's April 11, 1993, game at Hartford.
Missed part of 1993-94 season with strained ribs, an injury suffered during Toronto's Dec. 11, 1993, game vs. Calgary. He did not return to action until Toronto's Jan. 4, 1994, game vs. Tampa Bay.
Missed remainder of 1993-94 regular season with second degree shoulder separation, an injury suffered during Toronto's March 31, 1994, game at San Jose.
Missed part of 1995 season with cracked bone in foot, an injury suffered when he was hit by Brett Hull's slap shot during Toronto's Feb. 27, 1995, game at St. Louis. He did not return to action until Toronto's April 7, 1995, game vs. Detroit.
Missed parts of 1995-96 season with sprained knee, an injury suffered in October 1995, and with the flu, contracted on Jan. 1, 1996.
Missed parts of 1996-97 season with scratched eye, an injury suffered during Toronto's Dec. 27, 1996, game at St. Louis, and with bruised rib, an injury suffered during Toronto's Jan. 31, 1997, game at New Jersey.
Missed part of 1998-99 season with the flu, contracted in December 1998.
Missed part of 1998-99 season with elbow injury, suffered during Boston's Dec. 31, 1998, game at Dallas. He did not return to action until Boston's Jan. 28, 1999, game vs. New Jersey.
Missed remainder of 1999 playoffs with neck injury, suffered during Game 3 of Boston's first-round series vs. Carolina on April 26, 1999.
Missed part of 1999-00 season with strained groin, an injury suffered during St. Louis' Feb. 21, 2000, game at Anaheim.

Trades & Transactions
Traded to Toronto by Winnipeg with Paul Fenton for Ed Olczyk and Mark Osborne, November 10, 1990.
Traded to New Jersey by Toronto with Doug Gilmour and New Jersey's 3rd round choice (previously acquired, New Jersey selected Andre Lakos) in 1999 Entry Draft for Jason Smith, Steve Sullivan and the rights to Alyn McCauley, February 25, 1997.
Signed as a free agent by Boston, July 29, 1997.
Signed as a free agent by St. Louis, October 22, 1999.
Officially announced retirement, September 8, 2000.

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