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10-27-2012, 09:57 PM
  #517
CREW99AW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SingnBluesOnBroadway View Post
This is a good write up on the potential pricing out of the current Isles fans in Brooklyn.

http://nhl-red-light.si.com/2012/10/...r_a4&eref=sihp


But here’s a bigger reason why Islander fans might find the small size of the Barclays Center problematic. Chances are that ticket prices for games in Brooklyn could end up being among the most expensive in the NHL.

With a reduced capacity, the team may be forced to charge a steep price in order to keep up with NHL economics,
Someone should tell the writer that the isles new home, has 100 luxury suites. Almost 70 more then their current home.


Gallof has reported that the regular seats are gonna rise 25%.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2012/10/...slanders-away/
And, remember, those 14,500 (or now 15,500) seats will be priced 25 percent higher than the seats at the Coliseum, which would be equivalent to 17,300 Coliseum seats.


The Times article below, reports that the Isles will look to make their big profits on luxury suites and premium seating.
http://slapshot.blogs.nytimes.com/20...es/?ref=hockey
Q. Why would the Islanders move from the Coliseum, where they are tenants, to Barclays, where they will still be tenants?

A. The short answer: $35 million in extra revenue per year. That goes a long way toward wiping out the club’s current operating deficit, estimated at $8 million per year.

The main benefit in this move “is not in the increased revenue the Isles will get from the average fan; it’s in the huge increase they’ll get from selling luxury suites and premium club seats,” said Tony Knopp, chief executive officer of Spotlight TMS, a company that manages corporate tickets at Barclays Center and other sites around the country.

Barclays Center, which is far more geographically convenient to corporate customers than the Coliseum, has 104 luxury suites. Knopp estimated that those suites would generate about $21 million for the Islanders, while premium seating would generate an additional $33 million. That comes to $54 million from suites and premium seats — $35 million more per year than what the Islanders generate at the Coliseum.

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