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11-08-2012, 11:11 AM
  #67
Mayor Bee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dingo View Post
The Padres won their division four times in the last 20 years and also made it to the world series. While perenially having one of the smallest payrolls in baseball and revolving owners and management
In an extremely weak division, where winning 90 games will all but guarantee a division title. Two of those division titles were with less than 90 wins, and one involved an 82-80 record.

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Since 2000 the A's have made the playoffs six times that's almost 50% of the time in a sport that it's very hard to make the playoffs in
In the AL equivalent of the NL West, as far as both location and mediocrity go. Both West divisions have only four teams, while no one else has less than five, so there's also a mathematical advantage to being located in one of those divisions anyway.

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The Rays have made the playoffs three of the last 5 years
The first time they made the playoffs was the first time they had more than 70 wins in a season.

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Everything went drafting, trading, and developing under John Hart. The team has not done nearly as well of a job under Shapiro and that is a much bigger percentage of their problem.

It's much more about management than economics
Hart looks terrific because he had an inordinate number of trades work out well. Shapiro looks worse because he's closer to the league average.

Regardless, it's very much an economic issue rather than management. If Cleveland has a Cy Young pitcher coming up on free agency, everyone in baseball knows that he will not re-sign with Cleveland because they're not able to outbid anyone. If they have an MVP candidate in the field approaching free agency, the question is simply "Where will he go?" instead of "Will he re-sign?", since everyone knows that the latter is not going to happen.

And this puts the small-market teams in a position of needing to dump their premier players for whatever they can get in the form of prospects (or, in the NHL, draft picks as well). Not only that, but they have to hope like hell that those players develop into everyday players, or they'll have essentially lost an All-Star and have nothing to show for it. The difference is in the returns for Bartolo Colon (three players who became All-Stars), and that for CC Sabathia (two players who are out of baseball entirely, one who's still in the minors, and one who's just become an everyday player this year).

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