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11-15-2012, 03:05 PM
  #100
Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by God Made Me View Post
Here's a link to an article about the relationship between a player getting into the HHoF and him winning the Stanley Cup. http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nhl-pu...7348--nhl.html
I think the writer of the article lost me for good when he favoured Dave Andreychuk getting into the HHOF before Sundin thanks to having a ring. The writer probably forgot that Richards and St. Louis more or less put that ring on Dave's finger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JackSlater View Post
As far as the Olympics go, it obviously does not hurt his legacy terribly. Would you say the same thing about Bryan Trottier in 1984? Canada performed better in 1984 when Trottier switched to USA at age 28 than they did three years earlier, and Trottier was still healthy too. For what it's worth, I also think that the 1998 team was better than 2002. Lindros was obviously limited by head injuries by that point, and yet he still made the most talented national team in the world. For someone with clear ego issues, he still took on a minor role for the benefit of the team. This is a small benefit for Lindros' legacy, but it is still a benefit.
Well I know that Trottier did an unpopular move in 1984 and one that is puzzling to this day. He'd been in the US a mere 9 years and he chose to play with them in the Canada Cup. It's strange. But there is so much else that Trottier did in his career it gets forgotten. The same would go for Lindros, but the issue here is that we remember him as much as a concussion case and a mama's boy as much as we remember him as a fearless force on the ice and that's not good.

Just a side note, you really thought the 1998 Olympic team was better than the 2002 team? You should explain that.

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