Thread: KHL Expansion
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12-05-2012, 04:21 PM
  #203
Faterson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicente View Post
So what you guys are proposing is "**** KHL, **** NHL - let's have a global league". That's just dumb.
Why exactly? What's "dumb" about having a league uniting all of the world's top teams and top players, instead of having two or more such leagues? And what's "not dumb" about the status quo, with the best European players leaving for another continent so they pretty much never get to play in front of fans in the country where they grew up?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicente View Post
As if anyone in the world would like to see a game Minnesota Wild vs. Ak Bars Kazan or Dinamo Minsk vs. Los Angeles Kings...
Are you kidding, Vicente? Games against NHL teams would be a huge hit on the European side. Everyone would like to see them. As to the American side, if the European teams were competitive enough, they might definitely be a hit overseas, too. Remember how popular the various "Summit Series" have always been. If there was a world-wide hockey league, European stars like Ovechkin, Malkin, Kovalchuk, Selanne et al might never have left Europe... and you think they wouldn't draw big audience numbers overseas? I'm sure they would.

Quote:
Originally Posted by russianhockeyDOTde View Post
Or NHL teams doing a month long road trip to Russia. lol.
Who says "month-long"? Are the KHL teams doing "month-long" trips to Siberia and Khabarovsk right now? Nope. Yet the distance covered is (for Central European teams) substantially greater than if they played a string of games on a road-trip, say, on the American East Coast.

Here is what I would like... I would keep the regular season 82 games long as it is now in the NHL, and I would let about a quarter of those games be played against teams from the other continent. That means:
  • 42 games against teams from one's own division (those divisions would be broader than they are in today's NHL and KHL)
  • 20 games against other teams from the same continent
  • 20 games against teams from a different continent
In terms of home and away games, there would be an even split so that, for example, in Slovan's case, the home games would be:
  • 21 home games against teams from one's own division
  • 10 home games against other teams from the same continent
  • 10 home games against current NHL teams, i.e. teams from a different continent
Because there are 30 NHL teams now, if the above model was adopted, Slovan would get to play against all NHL teams at home in a 3-year rotation, which I would find acceptable and which is similar to today's NHL setup.

In terms of road trips, because a team would "only" be required to play 10 games per season on another continent, that could be done on 2 transatlantic road trips per 5 games each. 5 games hardly require a month, do they? In fact, there are much longer road trips in the current NHL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by russianhockeyDOTde View Post
Medvedev told that teams from Finland & Germany can join the league in the next season.
http://www.sovsport.ru/news/text-item/573971
That would be great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
He thinks there's enough money or companies to sponsor a team in Finland but clearly he hasn't been looking at the state of Finnish economy lately. Lots of companies laying off people and sport sponsorship in general being on the decline or companies at least being very conservative.
You know what... If the Finnish economy is down on its knees, perhaps that's the ideal scenario for a Finnish team to join the KHL. I'm half-kidding, but Slovakia's economy is in a terrible state, we're feeling the full impact of the financial crisis... and still Slovakia managed to send a team to the KHL the last 2 seasons. I should also mention that it is especially in times of crises that people seek diversion, in the world of sports, from the unhappy state of economy and politics. When everything is moving along smoothly, people are hardly likely to welcome any change to the status quo. But when things go bad, as they have in Slovakia in recent years, teams are pressed to look for new and better solutions, as Slovan did.

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