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12-06-2012, 06:30 PM
  #176
Ohashi_Jouzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
So the claim now is that the PCHA was a lesser league because they poached players from the NHA? Wouldn't stealing good players make them a more competitive league?
"The PCHA was a lesser league" is a blanket/overall assertion I made based on more than just a peculiar 3 year window, and with more than just one team in mind. I'll freely recognize that there was one team in the PCHA in any given window that proved competitive with the NHA - specifically, perhaps, the 1915-17 window (the war effect on these leagues having been explored already). I'll also point out that the "overall" strength of the league is being extrapolated from the success of that team by all of us who never actually had the chance to give either the "eye test". And while I also recognize how the league tables must suggest competitiveness across all 3 PCHA teams at any time, I call into scrutiny the same detail C1958 mentioned regarding how remaining regular season games were treated once the table was "decided".

Since the WCHL is obviously part of the picture, I'll also point out that PCHA games against the WCHL counted in the standings for the last couple of seasons the PCHA existed, which resulted in the Metropolitains leading the league with a losing record, suggesting the WCHL may, indeed, have been a "stronger" league. And remember, Chicago and Detroit didn't exactly prove super competitive in the early days of being added to the NHL fold, despite being strong in the WCHL. So, there's my rationale in a nutshell, I suppose. Just as importantly, I suppose, I think it's conceivable that the '70s WHA-NHL gap may actually have been similar (if not narrower) to (than) the '10/20s PCHA-NHA/NHL gap in loose/broad terms.


Last edited by Ohashi_Jouzu: 12-06-2012 at 06:35 PM.
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