Thread: OT: Music
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12-07-2012, 08:05 AM
  #160
Chapin Landvogt
Hockey's Future Staff
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Germany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch Frost View Post
Dude I listen to Sigur Ros (There Iceland's Radiohead before Radiohead went to crap) People think I am weird because I listen to a band that speaks no English.
Heck, they rarely even sing in Icelandic. Jónsi Birgisson's favorite singing practices revolve around gushing out and falsettoing sounds inspired by the musical accompaniment, or something like that...

Here's even an attempt to, uhh, 'define' it...
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigur_R%C3%B3s
Vonlenska

Vonlenska is the non-literal language that forms the unintelligible lyrics sung by the band,[41] Jónsi in particular. It is also commonly known by the English translation of its name, Hopelandic. It takes its name from "Von", a song on Sigur Rós’s debut album Von where it was first used.

Vonlenska has no fixed syntax and differs from constructed languages that can be used for communication. It focuses entirely on the sounds of language; lacking grammar, meaning, and even distinct words. Instead, it consists of emotive non-lexical vocables and phonemes; in effect, Vonlenska uses the melodic and rhythmic elements of singing without the conceptual content of language. In this way, it is similar to the use of scat singing in vocal jazz. The band's website describes it as "a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music";[42] it is similar in concept to the 'nonsense' language often used by Cocteau Twins singer Elizabeth Fraser in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of the syllable strings sung by Jónsi are repeated many times throughout each song, and in the case of ( ), throughout the whole album.
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