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01-21-2013, 12:54 PM
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Dreakmur
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Howie Morenz !!!


Awards and Achievements:
3 x Stanley Cup Champion (1924, 1930, 1931)

3 x Hart Trophy Winner (1928, 1931, 1932)

2 x First Team All-Star (1931, 1932)
Second Team All-Star (1933)
2 x NHL GM-voted First Team All-Star (1927, 1928)

Retro Conn Smythe (1924)

Hart voting – 1st(1928), 1st(1931), 1st(1932), 2nd(1925), 6th(1924), 6th(1926), 7th(1930), 8th(1927)


Offensive Accomplishments:
Points – 1st(1928), 1st(1931), 3rd(1927), 3rd(1929), 3rd(1932), 4th(1925), 5th(1926), 7th(1930), 10th(1924), 10th(1933), 19th(1935)
Goals – 1st(1928), 2nd(1927), 3rd(1925), 3rd(1930), 3rd(1931), 4th(1929) 5th(1926), 5th(1932), 5th(1935), 7th(1924), 17th(1933)
Assists – 1st(1928), 3rd(1931), 3rd(1932), 4th(1929), 6th(1925), 7th(1933), 15th(1927), 17th(1924)

Play-off Points – 1st(1924), 1st(1925), 8th(1930), 8th(1931)
Play-off Goals – 1st(1924), 1st(1925), 2nd(1930), 8th(1927)
Play-off Assists – 1st(1924), 1st(1931), 3rd(1933)

Cup Challenge Points - 1st(1924), 2nd(1925)
Cup Challenge Goals - 1st(1924), 2nd(1925)


Pre-Forward Passing: 1925-30
1st in Points, 124% of 2nd place Nels Stewart
1st in Goals, 120% of 2nd place Nels Stewart
2nd in Assists, 75% of 1st place Frank Boucher

Post-Forward Passing: 1931-35
6th in Points, 90% of 2nd place Busher Jackson
10th in Goals, 65% of 2nd place Bill Cook
4th in Assists, 77% of 2nd place Frank Boucher


Scoring Percentages:
Points – 131(1928), 106(1931), 98(1932), 93(1925), 93(1929), 89(1927), 81(1930), 80(1933), 72(1935), 67(1924), 60(1926), 53(1936), 46(1934), 44(1937)

Best 6 Seasons: 610
Next 6 Seasons: 413





Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Were the Days – The Stratford Streak
Long before Rocket Richard took his first strides toward superstardom with the Montreal Canadiens Howie Morenz was taking his giant steps to greatness. It is possible that he was the greatest goal-scorer major league hockey has known. Or, the most exciting skater in NHL history. Or, the fastest man to lace on a pair of skates. Perhaps he was all of these things, but we’ll never know for sure.

Morenz played when hockey was a different game from the high-speed sport of the seventies. In Howie’s rookie season, NHL rules permitted forward passing only in the center zone between the blue lines (the red line was not employed at that time) and four years passed before the league permitted forward passing within each zone.

The result was more of an individual than a team game. End-to-end rushes by such giants as Eddie Shore were sights to behold. But nobody could do it better than Morenz simply because nobody could skate as fast as the man they called “The Stratford Streak” and later “The Mitchell Meteor”.

There was something gallant about the Morenz style that as missing in the other great ones – even in Shore. Howie asn’t very big, yet he inevitably charges at the defensemen, preferring to bowl them over on his rush toward the goal rather than out-feint them and then skate unmolested toward the net.

….

Those words – “he skated at me… and then over me” – were to be repeated time and again by Morenz’ victims. Of course, Howie didn’t always succeed but he never stopped trying and an incident which took place in 1930 at Boston Garden really symbolizes his heroic qualities.

On this night Howie’s Canadiens were skating against the Boston Bruins and their notorious defense combination of Eddie Shore and Lionel Hitchman. At his heaviest, Morenz never cleared 165 pounds and both Shore and Hitchman were in the 200-pound category. By this time the style of the Mitchell Meteor as renowned among NHL veterans and the Shore-Hitchman team had devised a tactic to defuse it. When Howie charged toward the Boston blue line Shore would take the first crack at him but only in a halfhearted manner.

He would lunge at Morenz just enough to check him lightly and deflect the Montreal ace like a pinball toward Hitchman who’d attempt to hammer Morenz back to the Canadiens’ net. On this particular evening Morenz reached the Bruins blue line three times and in each instance was struck aside by Shore and pounded yards backward by Hitchman. It was an awful battering that sent shudders through the 12,00 Bruins partisans in Boston Garden.

After the third collision both Shore and Hitchman appeared reasonably certain that they had dispatched Morenz to the bench, if not the hospital. But to their amazement he skated behind his net, fidgeted with the puck on his stick, and skated headlong toward his foe. Once again, they applied the one-two punch and once again Morenz went down, this time with a grin. He looked up at his enemies and in none but friendly tones asked, “Don’t you s.o.b.’s ever get tired?”

Morenz was seemingly inexhaustible and nobody knew it better than Shore. Howie never made this point more evident than during the playoffs that seasons in which the Danadiens defeated the defending Stanley Cup champion Bruins in three games straight.

The play in question began with a high-speed Morenz rush, resulting in a shot that flew just wide of the Boston goal, hit the endboards, and ricocheted toward the blueline where Shore captured it and launched a charge toward the Montreal zone. At this moment, Morenz was hopelessly out of the play, deep behind the Bruins’ net. Instead of forfeiting a defensive play, Morenz leaped forward and sped after Shore.

“I still don’t know how Morenz stayed on his skates that night,” said Conn Smythe, manager of the Toronto Maple Leafs. “He was like a red, white, and blue blur as he chased Shore.”

Meanwhile, the Boston defenseman himself was skating at top speed, over his own blue line, toward center ice, readying for the feint at the Montreal defense. But it never came. Before Shore even reached the Canadiens’ blue line Morenz had not only caught up with him but, as Smythe remembered, “swooped around in front of him,” taking the puck off his stick and then heading back toward the Boston net for another scoring thrust. “I never saw a play like that before,” said Smythe, “and I don’t expect I will again.”

….

Although renowned for his bulldozer-like assaults on enemy defensemen, Howie also betrayed a healthy sense of guile. The somewhat bizarre charges at Shore and Hitchman were more a manifestation of his stubborn streak, than examples of stupidity. In fact, the very next time Morenz faced the Bruins both Shore and Hitchman were expecting more of Howie’s head-on charges at the blue line and to a certain extent they weren’t disappointed. Morenz took the puck on his very first shift and plunged forward toward the Boston behemoths. Shore and Hitchman, in turn, prepared to execute their pinball routine when Howie cut sharply just a foot or two in front of them, sprinted on what amounted to an end run, and skated in clear for an easy goal. The Bruins vividly recall Morenz wearing a broad smile on his face as he skated back to center ice and passed the two Boston defenders.

….

Like Frank Boucher, Syl Apps, and more recently Jean Beliveau, Morenz was a center who played an almost obsessively clean brand of hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Total Hockey – Biography
Howie Morenz was voted Canada’s outstanding hockey player of the half-century in 1950. He was considered the biggest star in the game during the colorful days of the 1920s and 1930s, and his great skill helped sell the game in the United States, where he was often called “The Babe Ruth of Hockey” because of his box office appeal.

….

An aggressive player throughout his career, injuries began to catch up with Morenz, and by 1933-34 his production tailed off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1 - Biography
Morenz was one of the fastest skaters in hockey and his hurtling rushes were to be a feature for years to come.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup , Vol. 2 – Biography
On his hurtling end-to-end rushes Morenz would frequently outspeed his linemates. They would follow through as best they could for a rebound or a passout if the meteor had finished in a corner. He was an aggressive player and for some years his opponents found that they could bait him into chippy penalties.

….

He was spectacular in the (1930) playoffs as the Canadiens won the Cup by defeating the powerful Bruins who had lost only five games all season.

… In the (1931) playoffs he was outstanding but went ten games before he scored a goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey's 100
During an era when low-scoring games were the norm and goals were hard to come by, Morenz totalled 270 in 564 regular season games but his game was more comprehensive than most.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens Legends: Montreal’s Hockey Heroes
His spectacular rushes and brilliant stickhandling lifted fans out of their seats. His desire to win was evident to everyone who watched him perform… As good as Morenz was as a goal scorer, Toronto general manager Conn Smythe was just as impressed with the center’s all-round game. Morenz knew that you needed the puck to score, so he’d work at checking to get the disk back…

….

One of Howie Morenz’ greatest strengths was his competitive nature and fiery approach to the game, despite his small size.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Canadiens: 100 Years of Glory
Besides his speed, Morez could handle the puck, he possessed extraordinary stamina and he was tough. The Senators tested him in their first meeting. Jack Darragh ran at him, but Morez flattened him with his shoulder and send him to the bench. He also laid out George Boucher, Billy’s older brother, with a stiff check.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada’s Top 100: The Greatest Athletes of All Time
Over the next 11 years, Morenz dominated the ice with his aggressive play and dazzling stickhandling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s Greatest Stars
Morenz quickly became famous for his blazing rushes and reckless style of play. Seemingly able to accelerate to top speed in a single stride, he helped establish Montreal’s growing reputation for “firewagon” hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Putting a Roof on Winter
At first glance, Morenz didn’t seem like all that much. Only five-foot-nine and 165 pounds, with thinning hair and perennial five-o’clock whiskers shadowing his amiable, earnest, sometimes puzzled face, Morenz liked to wander out of position as if playing a game in his imagination and not on the ice. He looked like somebody’s uncle who stumbled into the rink by mistake.

Like all great players, Morenz was inside his head, seeing the ice the way no one else could. As Rickard looked on, Morenz would pounce on the puck and speed along with it on his stick as if he had invented his own laws of physics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada on Ice – How They Broke The Heart of Howie Morenz
Morenz’s ceaseless drive did not stem from a physique comparable with the majority of hockey stars. He stood five feet eight and weighed 165 pounds. But he looked heavier than that because as Charlie Conacher once put it, “all his weight was in his face.” He had a wide high forehead from which thinning hair lay smoothly back, wide-set brown eyes and the suggestion of jowls on his dark-whiskered cheeks. But Morenz, with his comparatively small frame, never backed up from the big men. He loved the violent exchanges, the speed and the competition of the game and the roars of the fiery partisans who shouted his name in the Forum.

….

Once he received a terrible bodycheck from Red Horner, of Toronto, the league’s bad man who weighed 210 and stood six feet two. The check knocked Morenz 30 feet across the ice into a corner where he lay still for a moment. Then he climbed to his feet, skated shakily toward his own end of the rink and retrieved the puck. He bounced into a stride, catapulted directly toward Horner, faked a serve to deceive the defenseman and leaped past him nimbly past him to score.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Shore: And That Old Time Hockey
Morenz on ice was a sight to behold, and it was once said of the superstar that when he dashed forward at phenomenal speed, it was as if all other players were suddenly skating backwards. Morenz wore Number 7, but he skated by his opponents with such rapidity that, in the blur, they swore they saw 777. Morenz was so fast that he often struggled to properly set himself up for a shot. The man was a pest to his adversaries thanks to his ability to attack one second and then fly back the very next to be here, there, and everywhere.

….

Shore missed just one game due to his injuries and returned to duty to meet the Canadiens at the Garden, where he and Howie Morenz did their best to annihilate each other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey – Biography
Morenz’s incredible speed and incendiary offensive skills whipped crowds everywhere into chaotic joy. His incredible skating ability gave him the illusion of gliding on air. Although players like King Clancy accelerated faster than Morenz, no one could outpace him once he got going. His bullish play led to a string of minor injuries and the premature wear on his once-iron skating legs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey – In a Flash
Howie Morenz was like lightning. His skates left the ice in mid-stride, giving the illusion that he was airborne.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurel Joliat
I couldn’t tell you how many goals I scored merely by having to tip in a puck that he passed to me from the corner behind two opponents.
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Clancy
Morenz skated right at me, going like hell, shot the puck, and knocked me on my ass. I told him if he tried it again, I would cut his head off. He laughed and said he planned to do it again. Know what? He did.

....

He could adjust to any situation. He could barge between a defense, or he could poke the puck between your legs, then wheel around you and pick it up. His shot was like a bullet, and he didn’t fool around looking for an opening, he just let it go.

….

Morenz never even bothered to skate around me. He skated straight at me – and then over me.

....

He was the best. He could stop on a dime and leave you nine cents change. He was in a class by himself. And when he couldn't skate around you, he'd go right over you.

....

I seen 'em all score goals. Howe, wicked and deft, knocking everybody on their ass with his windshield-wiper elbows. Rocket Richard coming mad, guys climbing all over him. Hull, booming a slapshot like a WWII cannon. Wayne Gretzky mesmerizing the defence as he waltzes across the blueline, then wafting a feathery pass to a fast coming winger.....But I never saw anybody - nobody - score like Morenz on a furious charge down center.

....

There's nobody in the league today who is as good a skater. He could start on a dime and hit full speed within a couple of strides. He had wide shoulders, thin hips and about the strongest legs I've ever seen on a hockey player.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Shore
He had a heart that was unsurpassed in athletic history and no one ever came close to him in the colour department. After you watched Howie you wanted to see him often, and as much as I liked to play hockey, I often thought I would have counted it a full evening had I been able to sit in the stands and watch the Morenz maneuvers. Such an inclination never occurred to me about other stars.

....

I can truthfully say that he is the hardest player in the league t stop. He comes at you with such speed that it is almost impossible to block him with a body-check. He crashes so hard that his opponent often gets the worst of it. Ask me – I can tell, for he’s shaken me right to my toes many a time. Furthermore, he serves so quickly when travelling at top speed that you may miss him entirely. Add his bullet shot to his speed, and you have, to my mind, the greatest offensive combination in hockey today. Everybody likes Howie. He’s clean, fair, and sportsmanlike, and always gives his best. He’s the one player whom no opposing defense bears down on unnecessarily, because he doesn’t deserve any unduly rough treatment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
He was an inspiration for all of us to play with. Even the guys who played against Howie all loved him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy Worters
He could shoot harder than anybody I see nowadays.

....

Morenz is not number seven to me. He’s number 77777 – just a blur.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Primeau
We couldn’t take the puck away from Morenz all night, but no matter what he did, he couldn’t put the puck into the net. He finally got a break when we were penalized early in the overtime. By this time he had us dizzy trying to catch up with him and 15 seconds after our man went into the penalty box he took the puck himself, skated through our entire team, and scored. He made good on his promise to me but never said a word about it. Howie was the perfect gentlemen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Myles Lane
Howie Morenz was the fastest thing I ever saw on ice. He’d be in full speed after taking only two strides. Offhand, I’d say he was one of the greatest hockey players of all time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold Krease
Grace in every moment: a feather dart, a streamlined train, a swooping gull. There was poise, distinction, artistry in his skating form.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Kahn
First Morenz is circling behind his own goal. Then a little hop signals the start of his charge down center ice. Skating from the hips with ease, long strides, Morenz gains speed with incredible swiftness. The crowd at the Forum rises to its feet in waves, as he skates past and the cheering comes down in waves too, rolling from the tiers of seats louder and louder. As if to match the crescendo’s rise, Morenz drives himself still faster past the goal. In his path two defensemen brace and set their heavy frames. Suddenly, Morenz is upon them, hurling his body into the air as though he would jump over the two men. All the crowd is on its feet now and screaming. Somehow, Morenz breaks through. There is a feint, a goalie’s futile lunge, a hard, quick shot into the open corner of the cage. Morenz has scored. While the Forum rocks with sound, he skates easily back to center ice for the next face-off.

....

Other hockey players score goals and slam through defensemen, but the furious charge down center ice belonged to Morenz alone. Like a Babe Ruth home run or a Roger Bannister mile, a Morenz charge was, in a sense, the original. Other hockey players can only imitate it as best they know how!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy O'Brien
He would challenge the opposing defenses by dazzling dash and deception rather than by shooting from longer range and following up for a rebound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Coleman on the 1930 play-offs
Although Morenz had not scored a goal in the playoffs to date, he was easily the outstanding player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Clancy
Gretzky is one of the greatest. But I still say the greatest player ever was Howie Morenz. He could skate even better than Bobby Orr. He was just as great after you hit him as before.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Coleman
There never was a skater like Morenz. He burst through the defence like a cannonball. His wicked left-handed shots actually curved upward and outward in flight. Morenz was Man O War, Rudolf Nureyev and Dylan Thomas, all rolled into one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone Taylor
Howie was everything they say he was. He was a dynamic and forceful player. You can just say he was a real player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lester Patrick
Howie was really tops. He was colorful - supercolorful. He had a magnetic personality and he was easy to handle and no trouble at all to get along with. Any adjective at all would fit Howie. There'll never be a perfect hockey player, but Howie had many, many assets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Canadiens’ official website
Drawing crowds and dazzling fans across the NHL, Howie Morenz was the first player to have his number retired by the Montreal Canadiens.

No hockey player’s star ever shone brighter than that of Howie Morenz. Known as both “The Stratford Streak” and “The Mitchell Meteor”, Morenz was the NHL’s first true superstar, carving out a reputation as one of the best to ever play the game. His 14-year career began reluctantly and ended suddenly, sadly and prematurely.

….

Scoring at a rate unseen in the hockey world, Morenz became the biggest name in the game as his exploits filled arenas with curious spectators who quickly became fans. Attracted by the little man with the big reputation, they soon saw that the hype was warranted. Morenz typically finished the season in the upper echelons of the scoring lists, notching at least 20 goals seven times.

No giant at only 5-foot-9 and 165 pounds, Morenz played alongside the even smaller Joliat, each driving the other to surpass himself as they terrorized goaltenders around the NHL for a dozen years.

Morenz won the Hart Trophy – awarded to the NHL’s most valuable player – three times, in 1928, 1930 and 1931, a feat unmatched by another Hab in the 70-plus years since. He also finished atop the scoring race twice, peaking with an unbelievable 40 goals in 44 games during the 1929-30 campaign, one that finished with the Habs going undefeated en route to hoisting the Stanley Cup.

….


When the Hockey Hall of Fame opened its doors in 1945, Howie Morenz was among the 12 men who formed the initial group of inductees. In 1950, he was voted the outstanding hockey player of the first half of the century by a national press poll.

The number “7” that he wore while blazing a trail for the legends who followed was the first to be retired by the Montreal Canadiens, raised to the rafters of the Montreal Forum in 1937.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Howard "Howie" Morenz has often been referred to as hockey's first bona fide superstar. He electrified fans and confounded the opposition in a way that ensured his exalted status in hockey history. Remarkably, Morenz's total of 291 regular-season and playoff goals in 14 NHL seasons represents only one aspect of the enormous impression he left on the sport.

….

Morenz was one of the dominant offensive forces in the league in the late 1920s and early 1930s. He scored a league-high 51 points in 1927-28 and was presented with the Hart Trophy. Two years later he registered an incredible 40 goals in 44 games. In 1930-31, he won his second Hart Trophy and scoring title with another 51-point season. Morenz was also selected to the NHL's inaugural First All-Star Team in 1931. The following year he scored 49 points in 48 games and was awarded his third Hart Trophy in five seasons as well as another spot on the First All-Star Team.

….

In 1950, Howie Morenz was voted the outstanding hockey player of the half-century by a national press poll.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
We live in an era where we quickly give good hockey players the label of superstar. But rarely has hockey seen a true superstar - a player who transcends the great game itself. We've been blessed to see the likes of Bobby Orr, Gordie Howe, Wayne Gretzky, Bobby Hull, Mario Lemieux, Rocket Richard and a precious few others - hockey's true superstars.

Perhaps the first NHL player to transcend the game (arguably Cyclone Taylor, who played mostly prior the creation of the NHL, was the first hockey player to transcend the game) was the man they called "The Babe Ruth of Hockey" - the great Howie Morenz.

Morenz was the most electrifying player of his era, and perhaps ever. To compare him to a modern player for today's fans, "The Russian Rocket" Pavel Bure is an interesting comparison, although historically Morenz is most often compared to Maurice "The Rocket" Richard. However Morenz, unlike those two, excelled at both ends of the ice.

For much of Morenz's career forward passing was illegal so end to end rushes were the norm. Like Bure, Morenz excelled in that area in spectacular fashion. He had blazing speed and could do magical things with the puck at that speed. He would dance through the entire team, often with reckless abandon, and often resulting in a terrific scoring chance. He did so in dramatic fashion, often bringing the fans out of their seats like so few hockey players are able to do.

Ultimate Hockey's All-Star Team of the 1920s

Ultimate Hockey’s Best Skater of the 1920s
Ultimate Hockey’s Fastest Skater of the 1920s


Fastest Skater in the NHL – as voted by NHL columnists in 1934





Playmaking Ability:
In the first 5 seasons after forward passing was introduced, Morenz was among the leaders in assists.
Joe Primeau – 142 assists in 214 games
Frank Boucher – 140 assists in 234 games
Hooley Smith – 109 assists in 223 games
Howie Morenz – 108 assists in 220 games
Busher Jackson – 95 assists in 219 games

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Edmonton Journal – March 11th, 1931
Howie Morenz, dashing centre player of the world’s champion Montreal Canadiens, is the fastest skater in hockey, a quick, hard and accurate shot accompanying his phenomenal speed. He has the uncanny knack of getting a shot away at full speed without telegraphing the drive. These attributes, coupled with generous passing, have earned him the position of top scorer of both sections of the National Hockey League…

….

Although Morenz won his greatest renown for his spectacular lone rushes, circling his own goal and darting and swerving through the entire opposing team to score, he also is a great play-maker and passes unselfishly. His record of assists resulting in goals is almost as high as his total for goals scored.

His swerving, hesitating style of rushing is equaled by nobody in the game, and as he swings from one side of the ice to the other in a flash, he seems to increase his speed.

Defensive Ability:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada on Ice – How They Broke The Heart of Howie Morenz
Howie’s speed was a defensive asset too. Once in Ottawa a defenceman, Alex Smith, got a breakaway against Canadiens and had a 50-foot start on Morenz. But Howie caught him, batted the puck into a corner, picked it up, passed Smith going the other way and flipped the Aurel Joliat for a goal before the Ottawa team knew what hit them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nels Stewart
They don't come like Morenz very often, about one in a century. He had everything, could rush, score goals, backcheck. You couldn't put the Rocket in the same breath as Howie, and that goes for everybody else, including Bill Cook. None of them were in the same stable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
You can take any era of hockey and the stars of yesterday would be stars of today. And Morenz is right up there at the top of the class. I don't think from end to end I ever saw a guy like Morenz. He was small, stocky, with the most powerful legs you've ever seen. He'd make rush after rush - at least 20 a game - and it never mattered how hard he got hit. Most players, after they were hit, you'd think 'Oh, he can't take that again,' but it didn't matter with him. Shot up into the seats in one rush, by killers like Eddie Shore and Taffy Abel and the like, and he'd come right back as if they didn't exist. And I'll tell you another thing, one of the greatest backcheckers I ever saw. He was just a terrific hockey player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Adams asked if Rocket Richard was the greatest ever
Definitely not. He is colorful and undoubtedly one of hockey's greatest scorers. But to term him the greatest as against Gordie Howe, Eddie Shore and Howie Morenz is to overlook defense and passing skills and team spirit. The ability to score is most important, but it isn't all important.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommy Gorman
I would suggest that Morenz was the fastest and greatest two-way center in the game and that Richard is in a class by himself inside the blue line.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conn Smythe
The trouble is that writers are always talking about what a great scorer Morenz is. Which is true enough. But they overlook the fact that he's a great two-way player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – March 15th, 1929
Hooley Smith and Boucher are potential candidates for the pivot, but Morenz is too fast and his ability to hurdle through a defense right into the goal mouth gives him the edge over the other candidates. Howie also can poke-check with the best and his scoring proclivities, not much better than Boucher’s, surpasses Smith.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vern DeGeer - Toronto sportswriter
You can quote me once more as saying that Milt Schmidt is the greatest all-around player the NHL has seen since Howie Morenz. He's an amazing two-way performer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – April 13th, 1931
Morenz bore down with all his speed, broke up Hawks attacks and harassed their defence by breakneck rushes. His shoulder injuries prevent him from shifting fast around the defence in his customary style, but he makes up in effectiveness by an inspired defensive game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Were the Days – The Stratford Streak
The play in question began with a high-speed Morenz rush, resulting in a shot that flew just wide of the Boston goal, hit the endboards, and ricocheted toward the blueline where Shore captured it and launched a charge toward the Montreal zone. At this moment, Morenz was hopelessly out of the play, deep behind the Bruins’ net. Instead of forfeiting a defensive play, Morenz leaped forward and sped after Shore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Appleton, longtime Montreal Forum usher
Nobody could ever skate like Morenz. Two hops and he was at full speed. And back-check! When he missed a goal and went around behind the net he could go tearing back and catch the other team before they got the puck to the blue line.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ackcheck&hl=en
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
However Morenz, unlike those two, excelled at both ends of the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pit Lepine, February 1928
Last season Howie Morenz started to use a poke-check and at the close of the year he was getting very effective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Meriden Record - February 20th, 1931
The Bruins, from then on, did not get another real scoring chance, so well did Howie Morenz and his mates check them...


Last edited by Dreakmur: 05-22-2013 at 06:38 PM.
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