View Single Post
Old
01-24-2013, 08:38 PM
  #309
TheDevilMadeMe
Registered User
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 45,404
vCash: 500
1960s Blackhawks 2 of 3

Okay, so Hull and Mikita spent a good portion of the 60s seeing more ice time than stars from some other teams. But what style of play did Chicago play?

Mike Farkas first posted the following article on HOH a little while back:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frederick Daily Leader: May 4, 1971
Only a few years back Bobby Hull was the same dominant force for Chicago that Bobby Orr is now for Boston. The Hawks played hockey only one way. Offense, offense and more offense. But then they finished in the basement two years ago and decided to change their entire style. They became a defensive club and Bobby Hull, the celebrated golden jet, had to change along with them whether he liked it or not.

The change came hard for Hull. "I was used to having the puck all the time, skating with it, and playing 45 minutes of the game," he says. "After the club and I had a little contract difficulties I guess I didn't have the right attitude to begin with. When I came back the team was playing very well defensively. They wanted us wingmen to just go up and down in a straight line and simply watch the guy we were playing against so that they wouldn't do anything against you.

"That's what I did, I started going up and down and watching my guy and I just got into playing the different style of hockey. Oh, every once in a while you like to go back, pick up the puck and go with it, I expect you always have something left that you had before."

Bobby Hull showed everybody he did last Sunday afternoon.

That was the old Bobby Hull out there, not the new one. He was playing offensively, not defensively. He was playing the way he always had for most of the 14 years he has been with the Hawks.

Now with the Montreal Canadiens coming up in the finals, Hull will return to the Hawks' present style of play. That means he'll ne playing defensively again because that figures to be the way all the rest of the Hawks are going to play the Canadiens. Why abandon a successful formula, one that brought you two straight division championships and this far up to now?

Don't become startled though if Bobby Hull suddenly returns to his old way. Particularly if the series goes right down to the wire.

"Every once in awhile you like to go back, pickup the puck and go with it...
The article is crystal clear that Bobby Hull was capable of playing well defensively when asked, but that he usually wasn't asked to. It is also clear that the Hawks were basically a run-and-gun team (at a time when every other team thought defense-first to varying degrees). After a poor showing in 1968-69, they recommited to a more defensively responsible brand of hockey and from 1969-70 to 1972-73, they won 4 consecutive regular season titles.

How does all this affect Hull and Mikita's numbers?

Bobby Hul pointsl

1959-60 NHL 81 (1)
1961-62 NHL 84 (1)
1962-63 NHL 62 (9)

Reay brought in - Chicago stars start seeing massive ice time

1963-64 NHL 87 (2)
1964-65 NHL 71 (4)
1965-66 NHL 97 (1)
1966-67 NHL 80 (2)
1967-68 NHL 75 (6)
1968-69 NHL 107 (2)

Chicago recommits to a more defensively responible version of hockey (Hull is 31 years old)

1970-71 NHL 96 (5)
1971-72 NHL 93 (7)

After in 1972, Hull bolted for the WHA

Bobby Hull goals

1959-60 NHL 39 (1)
1960-61 NHL 31 (5)
1961-62 NHL 50 (1)
1962-63 NHL 31 (6)

Reay brought in - Chicago stars start seeing massive ice time

1963-64 NHL 43 (1)
1964-65 NHL 39 (2)
1965-66 NHL 54 (1)
1966-67 NHL 52 (1)
1967-68 NHL 44 (1)
1968-69 NHL 58 (1)
1969-70 NHL 38 (4)

Chicago recommits to a more defensively responible version of hockey

1970-71 NHL 44 (3)
1971-72 NHL 50 (2)

After in 1972, Hull bolted for the WHA

Mikita points

1961-62 NHL 77 (3)
1962-63 NHL 76 (3)

Reay brought in - Chicago stars start seeing massive ice time

1963-64 NHL 89 (1)
1964-65 NHL 87 (1)
1965-66 NHL 78 (2)
1966-67 NHL 97 (1)
1967-68 NHL 87 (1)
1968-69 NHL 97 (4)
1969-70 NHL 86 (3)

Chicago recommits to a more defensively responible version of hockey (Mikita is 30 years old)

Mikita has no top 10 points finishes after 1970, though he was still a very good player. He was over a point-per-game 4 times in the 70s, but this wasn't enough to be a top 10 scorer. He was, however, 3rd in points per game, while playing 57 games in 1972-73.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 01-24-2013 at 09:02 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote