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01-25-2013, 12:35 PM
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C: joe Mayer
1st: Don Mattingly
2nd: Ryne Sandberg
SS: Nomar Garciaparra
3rd: Ron Santo
LF: Dave Winfield
CF: Ken Griffey Jr.
RF: Hank Aaron

Bench:
Omar Vizquel - 3rd / 2nd/ SS
Enos Slaughter - RF
Jose Cruz Sr. - LF / CF / RF
John Olerud - 1st
Sal Bando - 3rd
Tino Martinez - 1st / Batting Coach
Dave Stewart - SP / Pitching Coach / Assistant GM

Batting Order:
1st - Sandberg
2nd - Garciaparra
3rd - Griffey
4th - Aaron
5th - Winfield
6th - Mattingly
7th - Santo
8th - Mauer

P: Nolan Ryan
P: Mike Mussina
P: doc gooden
P: Andy Pettitte
P: David Wells

R: Jack Aker
R: Don McMahon
R: Lindy McDaniel
C: Francisco Cordero
C: John Franco

Manager: Sparky Anderson

Hank Aaron nicknamed "Hammer," or "Hammerin' Hank,"
-> ranked 5th by sporting news all time.

Aaron made the All-Star team every year from 1955 through 1975[3] and won three Gold Glove Awards. In 1957, he won the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, while that same year, the Braves won the World Series. Aaron's consistency helped him to establish a number of important hitting records. He holds the MLB records for the most career runs batted in (RBI) (2,297), the most career extra base hits (1,477), and the most career total bases (6,856). Aaron is also in the top five for career hits with 3,771 (third) and runs with 2,174, which is tied for fourth with Babe Ruth. He is one of only four players to have at least seventeen seasons with 150 or more hits.[4] He also is in second place in home runs (755) and at-bats (12,364), and in third place in games played (3,298).

25× All-Star (1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1959², 1960, 1960², 1961, 1961², 1962, 1962², 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975)
World Series champion (1957)
3× Gold Glove Award winner (1958, 1959, 1960)
2× NL batting title (1956, 1959)
4× NL home run champion (1957, 1963, 1966, 1967)
1957 NL MVP
1970 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
Atlanta Braves #44 retired
Milwaukee Brewers #44 retired
Major League Baseball All-Century Team
MLB Records:

6,856 total bases
2,297 RBI
1,477 extra-base hits
17 consecutive seasons with 150 or more hits

Nolan Ryan nicknamed "The Ryan express"

Ryan, a hard-throwing, right-handed pitcher, threw pitches that were regularly recorded above 100 miles per hour (160 km/h). The high velocity remained throughout his career, even into his 40s. Ryan was also known to throw a devastating 12–6 curveball at exceptional velocity for a breaking ball.[2]

Ryan played in more seasons (27) than any other player in modern major league history. Ryan ranks first all-time in strikeouts (5,714), fewest hits allowed per nine innings (6.56), and no-hitters (7). He is also fifth in innings pitched (5,386), second in games started (773), seventh in shutouts (61) and is tied for 14th in wins (324). Opposing hitters hit only .204 against Ryan during his career, though they had a .309 on base percentage against him. He also limited hitters to a .298 slugging percentage.[1] Ryan had 15 or more strikeouts in a game 26 times, second only to Randy Johnson, who had 28. Ryan's lengthy career spanned generations as he struck out seven pairs of fathers and sons (for example, Bobby Bonds and Barry Bonds).

8× All-Star (1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1989)
World Series champion (1969)
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim#30 retired
Houston Astros#34 retired
Texas Rangers#34 retired
Texas Rangers Hall of Fame
Major League Baseball All-Century Team
MLB Records

5,714 career strikeouts
7 career no-hitters

Ken Griffey Jr nicknamed "junior" and "the kid"

A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).[2] Considered a five-tool player for much of his career, the Associated Press noted after his retirement: "In his prime, Ken Griffey Jr. was unanimously considered the best player in baseball."[3]

13× All-Star (1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007)
10× Gold Glove Award (1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999)
7× Silver Slugger Award (1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999)
1997 AL MVP
1992 MLB All-Star Game MVP
2005 NL Comeback Player of the Year
3× Home Run Derby winner (1994, 1998, 1999)
4× AL home run champion (1994, 1997, 1998, 1999)
AL RBI champion (1997)
Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Ryne Sandberg nicknamed "Ryno"

Sandberg established himself as a perennial All-Star and Gold Glove candidate, making 10 consecutive All-Star appearances and winning nine consecutive Gold Gloves from 1983 to 1991. His career .989 fielding percentage is a major-league record at second base.

Batting average .285
Hits 2,386
Home runs 282
Runs batted in 1,061
Teams

10× All-Star selection (1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993)
9× Gold Glove Award winner (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991)
7× Silver Slugger Award winner (1984, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992)
1984 NL MVP
1990 Home Run Derby winner
Chicago Cubs #23 retired

His last game at Wrigley Field on September 21, 1997 was also the last game during which Cubs broadcaster Harry Caray would perform "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" during the seventh-inning stretch, as Caray died the following offseason.




Ron Santo

A nine-time All-Star, he was a powerful hitter who was also a good defensive player, winning five Gold Glove Awards. Despite suffering from diabetes, he carefully concealed the condition for most of his career. The disease eventually necessitated the amputation of the lower half of both legs.

Batting average .277
Home runs 342
Hits 2,254
Runs batted in 1,331

Career highlights and awards

9× All-Star (1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973)
5× Gold Glove Award winner (1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968)
1973 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
Chicago Cubs #10 retired

Mike "The Moose" Mussina
Seven-time Gold Glove award winner.
Placed in the top five of voting for the Cy Young Award six times.
1994 Baseball America First-Team American League All-Star starting pitcher.
1999 Baseball America Second-Team American League All-Star starting pitcher.
Led AL in Won-Loss percentage (.783) in 1992
Led AL in Wins (19), Walks/9IP (2.03) and Shutouts (4) in 1995
Led AL in Games Started (36) in 1996
Led AL in Innings (237 ⅔) in 2000
Reached both the 2001 and 2003 World Series with the New York Yankees
Won 15 games in a season 11 times.
One 20 win season (2008), two 19 win seasons, three 18 win seasons, and two 17 win seasons.

Omar "Little O" Vizquel
Vizquel is considered one of baseball's all-time best fielding shortstops, winning nine consecutive Gold Gloves (1993–2001) and two more in 2005 and 2006. He tied Cal Ripken, Jr.'s American League record, since surpassed, for most consecutive games at shortstop without an error (95, between September 26, 1999 and July 21, 2000).[1] Currently, his .985 career fielding percentage is the highest of all-time for a shortstop in Major League history. On May 25, 2008, Vizquel became the all-time leader in games played at shortstop, passing Luis Aparicio. Vizquel is the all-time leader in double plays made while playing shortstop. He has the most hits recorded by any player from Venezuela (2,877; 40th all-time), surpassing Aparicio's record of 2,677 on June 25, 2009. On May 24, 2010, Vizquel became the shortstop with the third most hits all time, behind second place Derek Jeter and Honus Wagner. Vizquel is the sacrifice hit leader of the live-ball era.

3× All-Star (1998, 1999, 2002)
11× Gold Glove Award (1993–2001, 2005, 2006)
All-time leader in games played at shortstop
Most games played by an active (roster) player, 14th all-time
3-time All-Star (1998, 1999 & 2002)
Won 2 American League Championships (with Cleveland, 1995, 1997)
Won 6 American League Central Division Championships (with Cleveland, 1995–99, 2001)
Won the Hutch Award (1996), the only non-American player ever to do so
Won the Willie Mac Award (2006) for spirit and leadership
Finalist for the Heart & Hustle Award (2007) for embodying "the values, spirit and tradition of the game"
Captain of Venezuelan World Baseball Classic team (2006)
Member of the Hispanic Heritage Baseball Museum Hall of Fame

Dave Winfield

12× All-Star (1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988)
World Series champion (1992)
7× Gold Glove Award winner (1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987)
6× Silver Slugger Award winner (1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1992)
1990 AL Comeback Player of the Year
1992 Babe Ruth Award
1992 Branch Rickey Award
1994 Roberto Clemente Award

Don Mattingly

6× All-Star (1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989)
9× Gold Glove Award (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994)
3× Silver Slugger Award (1985, 1986, 1987)
1985 AL MVP
1984 AL Batting Title
1985 AL RBI Champion
New York Yankees team captain (1991–1995)

Joe Mauer

AL MVP (2009)
5× All-Star (2006, 2008–2010, 2012)
3× AL batting champion (2006, 2008–2009)
3× Gold Glove Award (2008–2010)
4× Silver Slugger Award (2006, 2008–2010)
1× World Baseball Classic participant (2013)

Dwight "Doc" Gooden

4× All-Star (1984, 1985, 1986, 1988)
3× World Series champion (1986, 1996, 2000)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1992)
NL Cy Young Award (1985)
NL Rookie of the Year (1984)
Triple Crown (1985)
Pitched a no-hitter on May 14, 1996
NL wins champion (1985)
2× NL strikeout champion (1984, 1985)
NL ERA champion (1985)

Andy Pettitte

3× All-Star (1996, 2001, 2010)
5× World Series champion (1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2009)
ALCS MVP (2001)
5x top 5 finish for Cy Young

John Franco

4× All-Star (1986, 1987, 1989, 1990)
2× NL Rolaids Relief Man of the Year (1988, 1990)
2001 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
Games pitched 1,119
Win–loss record 90–87
Earned run average 2.89
Strikeouts 975
Saves 424

David "Boomer" Wells

Wells was considered to be one of the game's better left-handed pitchers, especially during his years with the New York Yankees and the Toronto Blue Jays. He pitched the fifteenth perfect game in baseball history. He is tied only with Kenny Lofton for appearing in the post-season with six different teams.

3× All-Star (1995, 1998, 2000)
2× World Series champion (1992, 1998)
ALCS MVP (1998)
Pitched a perfect game on May 17, 1998
Win–loss record 239–157
Earned run average 4.13
Strikeouts 2,201

Sparky Anderson

He managed the National League's Cincinnati Reds to the 1975 and 1976 championships, then added a third title in 1984 with the Detroit Tigers of the American League. He was the first manager to win the World Series in both leagues. His 2,194 career wins are the sixth most for a manager in Major League history. He was named American League Manager of the Year in 1984 and 1987. Anderson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000.

Games managed 4,030
Win–loss record 2,194–1,834
Winning % .545

Nomar Garciaparra

After playing parts of nine seasons as an All-Star shortstop for the Boston Red Sox, he played for the Oakland Athletics, Los Angeles Dodgers, and the Chicago Cubs. He is one of 13 players in Major League history to hit two grand slams during a single game, and the only player to achieve the feat at his home stadium.

Batting average .313
Home runs 229
Runs batted in 936

6× All-Star (1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2006)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1997)
AL Rookie of the Year (1997)
NL Comeback Player of the Year (2006)
2× AL batting champion (1999, 2000)
5x top 10 League MVP voting

Enos "Country" Slaughter

During a 19-year baseball career, he played from 1938–1942 and 1946-1959 for four different teams, but is noted primarily for his time with the St. Louis Cardinals. He is best known for scoring the winning run in Game Seven of the 1946 World Series.

Batting average .300
Hits 2,383
Home runs 169
Runs batted in 1,304

10× All-Star selection (1941, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953)
4× World Series champion (1942, 1946, 1956, 1958)
St. Louis Cardinals #9 retired

Jose "Cheo" Cruz

Cruz debuted with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1970. It was as a member of the Houston Astros, however, that he became a household name across Puerto Rico and the United States. During his playing days, he was arguably the most famous baseball player (not counting the late Roberto Clemente) in Puerto Rico.
Cruz was traded to the New York Yankees in 1988, retiring at the end of the season. He had a total of 165 home runs and 1077 RBI during his career, while hitting for a .284 batting average.

José Cruz's number 25 was retired by the Houston Astros in 1992.
Cruz has been involved with all nine of Houstons postseason appearances, three as a player (1980, 81 and 86) and six as a coach (1997–99, 01, 04-05). As a player in the poststeason, he hit .400 in the dramatic five-game series against Philadelphia in the 1980 NLCS. Cruz represented the Astros in the MLB All-Star Game in 1980 at Los Angeles, and 1985 at Minnesota. He finished 3rd in NL MVP voting in 1980 and 8th in 1984. He won the NL Silver Slugger award as an outfielder in 1983 and 1984.

2× All-Star selection (1980, 1985)
2× Silver Slugger Award winner (1983, 1984)
Houston Astros #25 retired

Batting average .284
Hits 2,251
Home runs 165
Runs batted in 1,077
Stolen Bases 317

John Olerud

A patient, productive hitter throughout his career, Olerud won the American League batting title in 1993 and was runner-up for the National League batting title in 1998. Also a three-time Gold Glove winner, he was an excellent defensive first baseman and part of Sports Illustrated's "Greatest Infield Ever"[1] with Edgardo Alfonzo, Rey Ordóñez, and Robin Ventura, when he played for the Mets.

2× All-Star (1993, 2001)
2× World Series champion (1992, 1993)
3× Gold Glove Award winner (2000, 2002, 2003)
1993 AL batting title
1993 Hutch Award

Batting average .295
Hits 2,239
Home runs 255
Runs batted in 1,230

Sal Bando

During the A's championship years of 1971-75, he captained the team and led the club in runs batted in three times. He was the second American League third baseman to hit 200 career home runs, joining Brooks Robinson, and retired among the all-time leaders in games (5th, 1896), assists (6th, 3720) and double plays (7th, 345) at his position. In a 16-season career, Bando was a .254 hitter with 242 home runs and 1039 RBI in 2019 games played. His brother Chris was a catcher for the Cleveland Indians.
Over four consecutive American League Championship Series from 1971–74, he hit five home runs in 17 games, including two in a 1973 game and a solo shot in Game 3 of the 1974 ALCS, a 1-0 victory.

4× All-Star selection (1969, 1972, 1973, 1974)
3× World Series champion (1972, 1973, 1974)

Batting average .254
Home runs 242
Runs batted in 1,039

Lindy McDaniel

2 x All Star
Games pitched 987
Win–Loss record 141–119
Earned run average 3.45
Strikeouts 1,361
Saves 172

Over a four-game span, McDaniel retired 32 straight hitters in August 1968. In one of those games, he pitched 7 perfect innings against the Detroit Tigers.In 1973, he entered the game in the 1st inning against the Tigers in Detroit, and pitched 13 innings giving up one run and winning game 2 to 1. McDaniel played in 225 consecutive games in National League without committing an error—a record.

He considers his top overall year as 1960 with the St. Louis Cardinals when he logged a 12-2 mark in relief with 22 saves and an E.R.A. of 1.29 while being named to the National League All-Star team and earned Fireman-of-the Year honors. He ranks his next best year as 1970 with the Yankees when he was 9-5 with a career high 29 saves and 2.01 ERA followed by the 1963 season when he was 13-7 with 21 saves and a 2.88 ERA.

McDaniel won Fireman-of-the Year honors in 1960 and 1963. He also led the National League in relief pitching in 1959, but that was the year before the first Fireman-of-the-year award was presented. With nine saves and a 0.74 ERA, McDaniel was named the Player of the Month for June 1960.

Don McMahon

Win–loss record 90–68
Earned run average 2.96
Strikeouts 1,003
Saves 153.

All-Star selection (1958)
2× World Series champion (1957, 1968)

McMahon was used almost exclusively in relief during his 18-year MLB career. He appeared in 874 games, just two as a starter, and was one of the major leagues' busiest and most dependable relievers during his era. He never once spent time on the disabled list, and in the fifteen full seasons that he played (1958–1972), he averaged about 54 games and 81 innings pitched per year.

Jack Acker

AL Fireman of the Year (1966)
AL single-season saves record - 32 (1966)

Win-loss record 47-45
Earned run average 3.28
Saves 123
Strikeouts 404

Aker was used exclusively in relief. He appeared in 495 games, none as a starter, and was one of the American League's best closers of his era

Francisco Cordero

On June 1, 2011, Cordero recorded his 300th career save with the Cincinnati Reds, becoming only the 22nd player to reach that mark.

Cordero throws a hard fastball—capable of reaching the upper 90s, and also has an excellent slider that he can throw for strikes early in the count, and which he uses as his out pitch.


3× All-Star (2004, 2007, 2009)

Win-loss record 47–53
Earned run average 3.38
Strikeouts 796
Saves 329

Tino Martinez

2× All-Star selection (1995, 1997)
4× World Series champion (1996, 1998, 1999, 2000)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1997)
1997 Home Run Derby winner

Batting average .271
Home runs 339
Runs batted in 1,271

David Stewart

All-Star (1989)
3× World Series champion (1981, 1989, 1993)
World Series MVP (1989)
2× ALCS MVP (1990, 1993)
Roberto Clemente Award (1990)
Babe Ruth Award (1989)
Pitched no-hitter on June 29, 1990

Win–loss record 168–129
Earned run average 3.95
Strikeouts 1,741


Last edited by Porn*: 03-27-2013 at 12:36 PM.
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