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02-05-2013, 02:06 PM
  #13
wgknestrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vodeni View Post
Despres has the highest Corsi score, followed by Nisky, Malking, Sid and Letang
it is alarming that our third line has a very low number, basically saying that they do not posses the puck and have a very little offensive production

http://www.behindthenet.ca/nhl_stati...4+45+46+63+67#

What do you make of it?
Welcome to the complex world of starting to understand much more about hockey. Corsi is a great stat, but with every stat, there is "context" that is critical to understand. Corsi is heavy context related and this refers to how a player is used by a coach.

Pens 3rd line is a great example. Not only do they play against top competition (ie positive +- players, or 1st/2nd liners), they also start a high percentage of their starts in the defensive zone. This zone start metric is probably the biggest reason they are last in corsi on the pens. Byslma prefers to have them on the ice for defensive zone faceoffs (along with the 4th line for some reason).

http://www.behindthenet.ca/nhl_stati...61+62+64+65+66

Bylsma seems to like to heavily load his lines to optimize his chances of scoring. Top 2 lines (players who "can" score and have higher shooting %s) tend to start more shifts in offensive zone, while the 3rd/4th lines are tasked with tough assignments of getting the puck out of their defensive zone and pushing play into the other end.

The corsi numbers ARE NOT zone start adjusted which is very misleading. They are adjusted relative to team only.
Zone starts is the biggest factor to adjust for.


Depres is doing fairly well despite having a relatively easy assignment by Bylsma. Dan is sheltering Depres from other team's top lines, and a lot of defensive zone starts. He is still doing well though, indicating he should be able to handle more of a defensive load.

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