View Single Post
Old
02-15-2013, 02:58 PM
  #75
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 43,504
vCash: 500
The following includes quotes from Nighhawks' and Dreakmurs' profiles.

Tony Leswick, LW/RW

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends.com
Few people remember Tony Leswick as one of the top players of his era. Never a prolific scorer, Tony was nonetheless one of the best players in the NHL in the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends.com
Nicknamed "Tough Tony" and "Mighty Mouse," Leswick quickly developed a reputation as a [B]relentless checker, a tough as nails body checker, and perhaps the NHL's all time ultimate pest.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends.com
Although he did chip in offensively while in New York, including 27 and 24 goal seasons, Tony was best known for shadowing the league's top players.

As an overall player
3 x Stanley Cup Champion (1952, 1954, 1955)
Second Team All-Star (1950)
6 x NHL All-Star (1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1954). First 4 on merit.

Points – 17th(1948), 17th(1950), 19th(1947)
Goals – 6th(1947), 9th(1948), 17th(1950)
Assists – 16th(1950)

Points on his team (in a 6-team era): 1st (1947), 1stT (1950), 3rd (1948), 5th (1946), 5th (1949)

Awarded a "Retroactive Selke" by Ultimate Hockey for 1948-49

As a defensive forward and pest

Quote:
Legends of Hockey.net
Tony Leswick was a skilled forward who could play both wings during his twelve years in the league. He was a gritty competitor despite his 5'7" size and notched two 20-goal seasons. His skill and savvy helped the Wings win the Stanley Cup in 1952, 1954, and 1955.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 3
Among the outstanding players who possessed great skill as skaters, stickhandlers and backcheckers but were not likely candidates for the Lady Byng trophy, Tony Leswick is an example. This little player was rated as one of the best defensive forwards in the league. He played either wing and was a great penalty killer. He was a fast skater and full of hustle and spirit. His other attributes were anathema to the opposition. He kept up a constant chatter of deprecatory remarks concerning the antecedents or ability of opposing wings, interspersed with elbow action or buttends to goad them into penalties. This cost him time in the penalty box but he was usually successful in having one of the opposition stars for company... Jack Adams had observed his fine checking and scrappy play, and made a deal to get him... Retired in 1958. Some of his opponents must have sighed with relief at his departure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Anthony Leswick proved himself as one of the best defensive forwards in the NHL. Although a natural left-flanker, he could play both sides and was a bullish penalty killer - that is, if he wasn't in the box himself. He was a swift, strong skater who always hustled. He had a knack for getting his team going with a big hit on an opposing player... He was a decent stickhandler as well as a heads-up passer. Pound-for-pound, #8 was one of the best fighters in the league and was not one to shy away from a punching bee. "I did a little bit of fighting," he once confessed. "I could take care of myself. I wasn't afraid."
Quote:
Originally Posted by What It Means To Be a Red Wing: Metro Prystai
Marty Pavelich and Tony Leswick killed a lot of penalties together. Those guys checked the hell out of Montreal in 1952.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide OF Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
He was a tough customer who had lengthy and frequent battles with, among others, Maurice Richard. Despite his size and style of play, he missed exactly 2 games in his 11 full seasons in the NHL. He hit hard and took penalties, but he was also expert as a penalty killer. He was a goal scorer, passer, and hero all rolled into one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordie: A Hockey Legend
A quick, mouthy, frenetic hustler who could check, score, and fight, and who fit in ideally on the close-checking second line... a money player who always outdid himself in the playoffs...

One of the highlights of game 5, was the fighting effort of little Tony Leswick. At one point, Leswick was dumped in the corner by rugged Butch Bouchard; as he was scrambling to his feet, Leswick had his legs pulled out from under him by Jean Beliveau; falling flat on his face, Leswick leaped to his feet yet again, literally hopping mad, and swung his stick at Beliveau, who swung his own right back, then punched Leswick hard in the face. Undeterred, Leswick took possession and roared back with a furious rush on goal; he was only foiled at the last moment by ******'s great save.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Open Ice: The Tim Horton Story
Tony Leswick used to know how to trip Tim without getting a penalty when he was winding up. He used to hit Tim right between the top of the skate and the bottom of the shinpad, and dump him. It would infuriate him, and one day Tim couldn't take it any longer. They got in a battle and Tim had both his knees on Tony's arms, pinning him to the ice."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who’s Who in Hockey
…a small bulldog-type forward…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Boucher
Tony was a combative little bugger. He played a lot bigger than his size.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Stasiuk
Tony was one of the toughest little guys who ever played.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Chadwick
Leswick could bring out the worst in a saint.

Against Maurice Richard

Quote:
Greatest Hockey Legends.com
Perhaps his favorite target was Montreal's fiery Rocket Richard.

Leswick knew how to get under Richard's skin. Richard, who had a short fuse to start with, would often blow up at Leswick and assaulted him. Often Leswick would take Richard's shot and write it off as "taking one for the team." Richard would be banished to the penalty box while the Rangers would go on the powerplay. Other times Leswick was more than willing to answer Richard's battle cry, and the two would brawl it out. Both players were banished to the box, which of course would have to be a small victory for the Rangers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Leswick's favourite target was Maurice Richard. Leswick would be all over the Rocket for an entire game, mixing a shower of insults with a flurry of butt-ends and slashes. Leswick was especially skilled at goading his targets into penalties. Referee Bill Chadwick was once quoted as saying that Leswick "could bring out the worst in a saint!"
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Canadian Hockey Atlas
Once Bodychecked Maurice Richard so hard that the Montreal Canadiens forward brought down the protective shield above the boards.
Against Gordie Howe

Quote:
Greatest Hockey Legends.com
The only player perhaps more dangerous to tick off was Gordie Howe - not only arguably the greatest player of all time, but perhaps the greatest fighter of all time too. Leswick fearlessly needled Mr. Hockey with great success. Like Richard, no one had as much success keeping Howe off of his game as Leswick did.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
It was in shadowing the league's best players, however, that Leswick earned his stripes... some say Adams traded for Leswick so his boy, Gordie Howe, would not have to put up with the little NY Ranger pest anymore.
Clutch playoff scorer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Vaughan
Regardless of how the New York Rangers finally make out in their current Stanley Cup playoff series with the Red Wings, at least two members of the club have shown enough to assure themselves of fat contracts next season. They are Chuck Rayner and Tony (The Dynamite Kid) Leswick.

These two, more than any of the rest of the surprising Ranger team, have been responsible for making things much tougher than expected for the heavily favored Detroit club.
(description of Rayner's play)
As for the hard-going Leswick, who stands only five feet five and one half inches tall and belongs to the category of hockey player known as rink rat... he is a tough, all-over-the-ice player who has hit a new peak against the Red Wings.

Probably the fastest skater on either club, Tough Tony never quits driving. He has probably spent more time digging out the puck back of the Detroit goal than any member of the New York team. No member of the rugged Detroit team has been too big or too strong for him to tackle. Every one of the 2g and 3a he is credited with to date have been earned the hard way.

Incidentally, when he first joined the Rangers the big criticism of his play was his lack of ability to finish a shot when within firing range of an enemy goal. The same cannot be said of him now. Give him the opportunity and he very definitely knows what to do with the puck. Although on the shady side of 30, he still appears to have several years of Big Time hockey left in his wiry and chunky frame.
The Windsor Daily Star, April 3, 1948

Gordie Howe, who scored 47 goals during the 1951-52 regular season didn't score in the first 6 playoff games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Vaughan
Lesser lights like Johnny Wilson and Tony Leswick helped take up the slack while "The Big Gun" was silent
The Windsor Daily Star, April 14, 1952

For more on Leswick's feuds with Maurice Richard, Ted Kennedy, and Fern Flaman, see this summary of a Dink Carroll Column from 1955


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 02-14-2014 at 09:52 AM.
TheDevilMadeMe is online now   Reply With Quote