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02-24-2013, 09:30 PM
  #101
ck26
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Sergei Zubov
Серге́й Алекса́ндрович Зу́бов
"The Sultan of Sagacity"



Defenseman
Born 22 July 1970 in Moscow
6'01" 200 lbs
Shoots right

Stanley Cup winner: 1999, 1994
Stanley Cup finalist: 2000, 1999, 1994
Olympic gold medal: 1992
World juniors winner: 1989
World juniors finalist: 1990, 1989

NHL second-team all-star: 2006
NHL all-star game: 2000, 1999, 1998
3x top-10 in assists (all skaters) … 93-94: 77 (Gretzky, 92) … 97-98: 47 (Gretzky, 67) … 05-06: 58 (Thornton, 96)
12 straight 30-assist seasons (1996-2008)
Highest-scoring Russian-born defenseman in NHL history
FIRST DEFENSEMAN TO EVER LEAD A FIRST-PLACE TEAM IN SCORING (1994 NY Rangers)
SECOND DEFENSEMAN TO EVER LEAD A STANLEY CUP CHAMPION IN REGULAR-SEASON SCORING (Bobby Orr, 1970 Boston Bruins)

Norris Trophy Voting:
1993-1994: 4th (Bourque, Stevens, MacInnis)
1999-2000: 9th (Pronger, Lidstrom, Blake, Desjardins, Gonchar, Chelios, Bourque, X)
2000-2001: 8th (Lidstrom, Bourque, Stevens, Blake, Leetch, Gonchar, MacInnis)
2002-2003: 8th (Lidstrom, MacInnis, D Hatcher, Gonchar, Blake, Jovanovski, Chara)
2005-2006: 3rd (Lidstrom, Niedermayer)
2006-2007: 9th (Lidstrom, Niedermayer, Pronger, Boyle, X, Phaneuf, Gonchar, Souray)

CAREER STATS
88-89 CSKA Moscow 29gp 1g 4a 5p 10pim
89-90 CSKA Moscow 48gp 6g 2a 8p 16pim
90-91 CSKA Moscow 41gp 6g 5a 11p 12pim
91-92 CSKA Moscow 36gp 4g 7a 11p 6pim
92-93 Binghamton (AHL) 30gp 7g 29a 36p 14pim +31 11gp 5g 5a 10p +2
92-93 NY Rangers 49gp 8g 23a 31p 4pim -1
93-94 NY Rangers 78gp 12g 77a 89p 39pim +20 22gp 5g 14a 19pts 0pim
94-95 NY Rangers 38gp 10g 26a 36p 18pim -2 10gp 3g 8a 11p 2pim
95-96 Pittsburgh P 64gp 11g 55a 66p 22pim +28 18gp 1g 14a 15p 26pim
96-97 Dallas Stars 78gp 13g 30a 43p 24pim +19 7gp 0g 3a 3p 2pim
97-98 Dallas Stars 73gp 10g 47a 57p 16pim +16 17gp 4g 5a 9p 2pim
98-99 Dallas Stars 81gp 10g 41a 51p 20pim +9 23gp 1g 12a 13p 4pim
99-00 Dallas Stars 77gp 09g 33a 42p 18pim -2 18gp 2g 7a 9p 6pim
00-01 Dallas Stars 79gp 10g 41a 51p 24pim +22 10gp 1g 5a 6p 4pim
01-02 Dallas Stars 80gp 12g 32a 44p 22pim -4
02-03 Dallas Stars 82gp 11g 44a 55p 26pim +21 12gp 4g 10a 14p 4pim
03-04 Dallas Stars 77gp 07g 35a 42p 20pim e 5gp 1g 1a 2p 0pim
05-06 Dallas Stars 78gp 13g 58a 71p 46pim +20 5gp 1g 5a 6p 6pim
06-07 Dallas Stars 78gp 12g 42a 54p 26pim e 6gp 0g 4a 4p 2pim
07-08 Dallas Stars 46gp 04g 31a 35p 12pim +6 11gp 1g 5a 6p 4pim
08-09 Dallas Stars 10gp 00g 04a 04p 0pim -4
09-10 St. Petersburg (KHL) 53gp 10g 32a 42p 32pim +8 4gp 0g 2a 2p 0pim

Dallas Stars Season-by-Season Results
Zubov's years with Dallas bolded. The only other significant additions Dallas made for 1996/1997 were the free agent signings of 53-point scorer Pat Verbeek and grinder Dave Reid. Most Stars fans / media will describe that summer's trade of Kevin Hatcher for Sergei Zubov as far-and-away the best in franchise history.

1993–94 … 84 GP … 097 pts … 3rd, Central division, 2nd round of playoffs
1994–95 … 48 GP … 042 pts … 5th, Central division, 1st round of playoffs
1995–96 … 82 GP … 066 pts … 6th, Central division, missed playoffs
1996–97 … 82 GP … 104 pts … 1st, Central division, 1st round of playoffs
1997–98 … 82 GP … 109 pts … 1st, Central division, Conference Finals
1998–99 … 82 GP … 114 pts … 1st, Pacific division, Stanley Cup Champions
1999–00 … 82 GP … 102 pts … 1st, Pacific division, Stanley Cup Finals
2000–01 … 82 GP … 106 pts … 1st, Pacific division, 2nd round of playoffs
2001–02 … 82 GP … 090 pts … 4th, Pacific division, missed playoffs
2002–03 … 82 GP … 111 pts … 1st, Pacific division, 2nd round of playoffs
2003–04 … 82 GP … 097 pts … 2nd, Pacific division, 1st round of playoffs
2005–06 … 82 GP … 112 pts … 1st, Pacific division, 1st round of playoffs
2006–07 … 82 GP … 107 pts … 3rd, Pacific division, 1st round of playoffs
2007–08 … 82 GP … 097 pts … 3rd, Pacific division, Conference finals

2008–09 … 82 GP … 83pts … 3rd, Pacific division, missed playoffs
2009–10 … 82 GP … 88 pts … 5th, Pacific division, missed playoffs
2010–11 … 82 GP … 95 its … 5th, Pacific division, missed playoffs
2011-12 … 82 GP … 89 pts … 4th, Pacific division, missed playoffs

After his retirement, Zubov was re-united with former GM Doug Armstrong and former coach Ken Hitchcock as a hockey operations consultant for the St Louis Blues.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
In the late 1990s, the Dallas Stars emerged as one of the dominant franchises in the NHL, winning the Stanley Cup in 1999 and returning to the finals in 2000. Night in and night out, coach Ken Hitchcock sent out an incredible lineup that boasted goalie Ed Belfour and skaters Brett Hull, Mike Modano and Joe Nieuwendyk, to name just a few. But it may be said that no other player has been as crucial to the team's success as its Russian defenseman, Sergei Zubov.

An offensive-minded rearguard, the 6-foot 1-inch, 200-pound Zubov adds tremendous scoring as well as consistent leadership on the power play. "He brings his great skill with him, and his performance has been so consistent," says Stars general manager Bob Gainey.

Zubov played four seasons with Moscow's Central Red Army team, between 1988 and 1992. In 1990 the New York Rangers drafted Zubov in the fifth round with the 85th overall pick. They assigned him to their AHL farm team in Binghamton, New York, in 1992, and after 30 games he'd registered 36 points and earned a promotion. In his first 49 NHL games he generated a promising 8 goals and 31 points. His second season, 1993-94, he reached his offensive zenith, scoring 77 assists and 89 points. He added 5 goals and 19 points during the playoffs to help the Rangers win their first Stanley Cup since 1940.

After parts of three seasons in the Ranger organization, Zubov was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins. After only one year in Penguin black and gold, he was dealt to the Dallas Stars. He quickly became a favorite of the Texas fans, wowing them with his strong skating and superb stickhandling, both traits that were at a premium within coach Hitchcock's defensive system.

Although Zubov has traditionally taken few penalties, he is not afraid of physical play. He specializes in quick rushes out of the defensive zone and is an expert at making short, hard passes to set up a forward [breaking out of the defensive zone]. In 1996-97, his first season in Dallas, he was tops among all NHL defenders with 47 assists.

Zubov and the Stars returned to the finals yet again in 2000, only to fall short against a talented New Jersey Devils squad. One of the more durable players in the league, Zubov played in his 700th NHL game during the 2001-02 season and registered career point number 500 that same year, while helping team Russia earn a bronze medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Sturm, 1310AM The Ticket, 16 July 2009 … Sturm is the authoritative mainstream media voice in the Dallas hockey community
I finally have a chance to write about the Stars again, and more specifically, the story that is in the process of completion as speak: The exit of the great Sergei Zubov.

I think many of us hate to see this happen. Zubov is one of my absolute favorite Dallas Stars for years and years. Imagining this organization moving on without him is as tough to process as moving on without Mike Modano or Jere Lehtinen. But, there comes a time. And that time is now it would appear. Zubov and his agent claim that they have up to 9 teams who are interested in Zubov. That is a believable number, and in reality, you wonder what the other 20 teams are thinking. A healthy Zubov merits a spot on any team in the National Hockey League. A healthy Zubov is amazing.

A healthy Zubov, say one that is somewhere between the ages of 25-37, is one that kills all of the penalties, powers all of the power plays, and plays roughly 30 minutes of every 60 minute playoff game. He is the calmest player on the ice, but also plays with incredible vision and clarity of what each moment calls for. There is no question that Sergei Zubov is a player who belongs in the Hockey Hall of Fame, and it will be an absolute travesty if that doesn’t happen.

But, that is for later. What about now? [While Zubov was out injured] Didn’t the Dallas Stars have the 27th best Power Play in the NHL? And, didn’t they also have the 24th best Penalty Kill in the NHL? And would anyone argue that he is the very best defensemen on both of those units that the Dallas Stars have EVER had? – (Some might suggest Derian Hatcher was the better penalty killer for his fine work clearing the crease in front of Ed Belfour, but I would roll with Zubie) – I think back to the firing of Dave Tippett, and when Joe Nieuwendyk was at the press conference he made reference to the special teams not being terribly special. I would interject that Dave Tippett was trying to make due without his best option on the ice.

He has been a fabulous member of the Stars organization, and his #56 must be retired moments after he does.

http://stars.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=39282
http://insidecorner.dmagazine.com/20...e-after-zubov/
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Gosselin, Dallas Morning News, 8 Feb 2013 … Gosselin isn't the writer of record in Dallas, but he's pretty good
Alex Goligoski’s struggles with the Stars this season have given me a greater appreciation of Sergei Zubov. Sellout crowds serenaded GK Ed Belfour at the turn of the 2000 decade when the Stars were among the best teams in hockey. Those crowds also cheered the goal-scoring theatrics of Brett Hull, Mike Modano and Joe Nieuwendyk. But I always believed Zubov was the glue that held that team together. The Russian influence on the NHL was puck control. There was no wasted motion, no wasted passes, few wasted shots. The Igor Larionovs, Sergei Fedorovs and Alexander Mogilnys dazzled North American hockey with their skating and stick work. They controlled pucks and games.

Zubov was a master at it. Hockey is played at an often-frantic pace, but when Zubov claimed the puck, the game slowed down. A calm was restored in the Stars’ defensive end. Everyone in the building could exhale because the Stars would no longer be in danger in their own zone.

Zubov was going to move the puck in the other direction. He could single-handedly win a game of keep-a-way. AFTER ZUBOV ARRIVED IN DALLAS IN 1996, THE STARS BEGAN COMPETING FOR STANLEY CUPS. THEY MADE A QUANTUM LEAP IN THE STANDINGS FROM 66 POINTS TO 104 THAT SEASON AND WON THEIR FIRST DIVISION TITLE IN 13 YEARS. WHEN A HIP INJURY ENDED ZUBOV'S NHL CAREER IN 2008, THE STARS STOPPED COMPETING FOR STANLEY CUPS. THEY HAVENT' BEEN BACK TO THE PLAYOFFS SINCE HIS DEPARTURE.


What Zubov gave this franchise would be difficult for anyone to match. The Stars have seven 100-point seasons in franchise history, and Zubov was on the ice for all of them. Literally. He annually ranked among the league leaders in ice time, averaging almost 26 minutes per game in his Stars career. In the 1999 Stanley Cup championship season, Zubov averaged better than 30 minutes per game in the playoffs. Zubov was the franchise’s security blanket. The Stars wanted him on the ice as much as possible because when he touched the puck, good things happened. HE WAS A PLUS-148 IN HIS NHL CAREER.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/col...rgei-zubov.ece
Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times, 29 Apr 2000
ZUBOV IS KEY TO VICTORY
Sergei Zubov, whose absence the last month left Dallas's power play sagging, assisted on two goals with a man advantage last night as the host Stars beat San Jose, 4-0, in the opener of their second-round series.

The Stars came into the game just 2 for 26 on the power play this postseason, but that was without Zubov, who usually runs the unit.

Zubov had a hand in the first one as he backhanded a shot into Shields that caromed to Modano. He was wide open in front of the net and swatted it in for a 2-0 lead with 5:59 left in the first period.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/04/29/sp...o-victory.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Hitchcock, Dallas Stars coach, explaining the new arrival to Texas sports fans in 1996
"He's like Troy Aikman would be to any NFL team. He's a quarterback, and a great one. He can quarterback the powerplay and he can quarterback the team during even strength."http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ei+zubov&hl=en
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Heika, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 1996
By that, Hitchcock means Zubov is a master of directing traffic. Like a basketball point guard, he gets his teammates the puck in the places where they're most comfortable shooting. He's also an exert at zipping the "breakout" pass from his own goal line to the red line, thus springing his forwards for breakaway rushes.http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ei+zubov&hl=en


youtube highlights
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROeVF5VTUEk ... go to 3:21 and watch Zubov dangle an entire team, then listen to Darryl Reaugh's (Stars color commentator and former NHL goalie) reaction

more stats and quotes and stuff …


Last edited by ck26: 04-20-2013 at 01:40 PM.
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