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03-14-2013, 12:17 PM
  #142
CrAzYNiNe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjell Dahlin View Post
You are assuming that there is zero risk associated with giving to a young man a long terms deal. Giving him a bridge contract may prove to be helpful in making sure Subban becomes the great D we all know he can be... and almost already is. This bridge contract offered us an insurance policy in case Subban regresses during the upcoming season, it acts as an incentive factor and it did put less pressure on this young man’s shoulders.

It also gave us much needed cap flexibility (the cap will go down next season) for the upcoming season.

I don't see paying a great D, great D money as a loss btw.

EDIT:

Bridge scenario for the next 8 years; cap hit assuming Subban keeps on progressing: 48M$ (3 - 3 - 7 - 7 - 7 - 7 - 7 - 7)
No bridge, 8 years deal in 2012-13: 44M$ (5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5 - 5,5)

We are not chatting about a huge impact here: 4M$ over 8 years. This 4M$ gives us all of the above advantages.
To me Subban doesn't seem like the type to play one way for one contract or another way for another contract. The hockey season started and Subban did not have a contract. I believe Subban likes the pressure and plays better because of it.

This is a post from back in January: http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...&postcount=592 where I explain my reasoning for his contract.

These are the scenarios that I see now:

This is what I would of wanted:
2013 ---------> 4,000,000$
2013-2014 ---> 4,500,000$
2014-2015 ---> 5,000,000$
2015-2016 ---> 6,500,000$
2016-2017 ---> 7,000,000$
2018-2019 ---> 7,500,000$
Cap hit of 5,750,000$

This is what happened:

2013 ---------> 2,000,000$ (end of the season he is 24)
2013-2014 ---> 3,750,000$ (end of the season he is 25)
Cap hit of $2,875,000
2014-2015 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 26)
2015-2016 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 27)
2016-2017 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 28)
2018-2019 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 29)
2019-2020 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 30)
2020-2021 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 31)
2021-2022 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 32)
2022-2023 ---> 7,000,000$ + (end of the season he is 33)
Cap hit of 7,000,000$ +

So with this, he will have a cap hit of 7,000,000$ + for most of his prime.

Now let's take a look at my scenario
2013 ---------> 4,000,000$ (end of the season he is 24)
2013-2014 ---> 4,500,000$ (end of the season he is 25)
2014-2015 ---> 5,000,000$ (end of the season he is 26)
2015-2016 ---> 6,500,000$ (end of the season he is 27)
2016-2017 ---> 7,000,000$ (end of the season he is 28)
2018-2019 ---> 7,500,000$ (end of the season he is 29)
Cap hit of 5,750,000

To stay in compliance with the 35% year to year rule + the 50% of lowest to highest, this is the deal I would offer
2019-2020 ---> 7,000,000$ (end of the season he is 30)
2020-2021 ---> 7,000,000$ (end of the season he is 31)
2021-2022 ---> 5,600,000$ (end of the season he is 32)
2022-2023 ---> 5,600,000$ (end of the season he is 33)
2023-2024 ---> 5,600,000$ (end of the season he is 34)
2024-2025 ---> 3,700,000$ (end of the season he is 35)
2025-2026 ---> 3,700,000$ (end of the season he is 36)
Cap hit of 5,457,000

Now we have an elite D playing for the Habs his entire career, earning 72.7 million dollars over the 13 year span of this deal and he never has a cap hit of 7 million, which is a savings of 1.25-1.5 million dollars of cap space a year for 13 years.

So this 4 million over 8 years you got, well I see it very differently.

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