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03-23-2013, 09:41 PM
  #763
Hardyvan123
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
But shouldn't you ask yourself WHY the Oilers were the greatest offensive team of all-time? Take away Gretzky and they aren't. The proof is in the pudding here with the Oilers:

1983-84 - 446 goals
1984-85 - 401 goals
1985-86 - 426 goals
1986-87 - 372 goals
1987-88 - 363 goals (Gretzky missed 16 games)
1988-89 - 325 goals

Los Angeles
1987-88 - 318 goals
1988-89 - 376 goals (led the NHL with Gretzky's first season as a King)

I think Gretzky himself was rather responsible for this "perfect storm" here don't you think? Just by the stroke of a pen he was traded and the team he went to compared to the team he left literally swapped numbers



Kent Nilsson is a prime example of a player who could have worked harder. There were lots like him, just like today there are lots like him. How many times have we complained about Mogilny, Semin, Kovalev, Green? Or even players like Malkin or Jagr who we often feel have all the talent in the world but have been known to play rather inconsistent hockey? Ask Leaf fans about Kessel. You seem to think that players mailing it in and not giving it 100% was exclusive only to the 1980s. Hardly. It was the same as today, there were some players with the desire to exceed and win more than others. Gretzky was one of them who never quit. Messier was another. Crosby is definitely one of those players today, as it Toews. But you seem to think players weren't trying in the 1980s.
Sure players were trying but defenses weren't working as hard and there were many "easier nights" back then too.

You are right with the 3 more recent guys you mentioned but on the other side the game is way more over coached and "defensive" in every sense of the word game in game out in the NHL post lockout compared to the 80's

People see the differences in basketball with the high scoring 70's compared to today, why is it so hard to acknowledge those differences in hockey?

Just ask players who played back then, Ray Ferraro has confirmed this on radio more than once and he isn't the only guy.

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