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07-16-2013, 10:31 PM
  #62
Steve BachIntyre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spawn View Post
Is there anything to back up the notion that if you are 15 pounds heavier you are less likely to get worn down from being hit? Not sure I buy that.

Now if you want to say that when you are 15 pounds heavier you will wear your opponent down more, sure that can be argued. But being bigger does not make you more durable, or have greater endurance or anything of the sort. I want to see some actual stats that say big players are less likely to get hurt, or are less likely to wear down as the season goes on. I don't buy it for a minute.

Size is one of the last things I'm concerned about. I'm much more concerned about having quality NHL players who actually know how to play the game. If they are big, great. If not, that is not the biggest issue in the world.
This proves that you will become worn down faster (on average) if you are hit by more weight.. You said you wanted stats but didnt specify what type.. and you did not ask for an explanation of such stats. so here you go. enjoy.

and as for the 15 lbs. heavier yes i meant to write if the opponant was 15 pounds lighter, and the oiler was heavier, then we would be doing it to them. wearing them down with hits. confusing eh.. long 12 hour days.


Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that together laid the foundation for classical mechanics. They describe the relationship between a body and the forces acting upon it, and its motion in response to said forces. They have been expressed in several different ways over nearly three centuries,[1] and can be summarized as follows:

First law: When viewed in an inertial reference frame, an object either is at rest or moves at a constant velocity, unless acted upon by a force.[2][3]
Second law: The acceleration of a body is directly proportional to, and in the same direction as, the net force acting on the body, and inversely proportional to its mass. Thus, F = ma, where F is the net force acting on the object, m is the mass of the object and a is the acceleration of the object.
Third law: When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to that of the first body.

Classical mechanics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_mechanics

Motion (physics)
In physics, motion is a change in position of an object with respect to time and its reference point. Motion is typically described in terms of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and time.[1] Motion is observed by attaching a frame of reference to a body and measuring its change in position relative to another reference frame.

A body which does not move is said to be at rest, motionless, immobile, stationary, or to have constant (time-invariant) position. An object's motion cannot change unless it is acted upon by a force, as described by Newton's first law. An object's momentum is directly related to the object's mass and velocity, and the total momentum of all objects in a closed system (one not affected by external forces) does not change with time, as described by the law of conservation of momentum.


Displacement (vector)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_%28vector%29

A displacement is the shortest distance from the initial to the final position of a point P.[1] Thus, it is the length of an imaginary straight path, typically distinct from the path actually travelled by P. A 'displacement vector' represents the length and direction of that imaginary straight path.

A position vector expresses the position of a point P in space in terms of a displacement from an arbitrary reference point O (typically the origin of a coordinate system). Namely, it indicates both the distance and direction of an imaginary motion along a straight line from the reference position to the actual position of the point.

Velocity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velocity

In kinematics, velocity is the rate of change of the position of an object, equivalent to a specification of its speed and direction of motion. For motion in one dimension, velocity can be defined as the slope of the position vs. time graph of an object. Speed describes only how fast an object is moving, whereas velocity gives both how fast and in what direction the object is moving.[1] If a car is said to travel at 60 km/h, its speed has been specified. However, if the car is said to move at 60 km/h to the north, its velocity has now been specified. To have a constant velocity, an object must have a constant speed in a constant direction. Constant direction constrains the object to motion in a straight path (the object's path does not curve). Thus, a constant velocity means motion in a straight line at a constant speed. If there is a change in speed, direction, or both, then the object is said to have a changing velocity and is undergoing an acceleration. For example, a car moving at a constant 20 kilometres per hour in a circular path has a constant speed, but does not have a constant velocity because its direction changes. Hence, the car is considered to be undergoing an acceleration.

Velocity is a vector physical quantity; both magnitude and direction are required to define it. The scalar absolute value (magnitude) of velocity is called "speed", a quantity that is measured in metres per second (m/s or m⋅s−1) when using the SI (metric) system. For example, "5 metres per second" is a scalar (not a vector), whereas "5 metres per second east" is a vector. The rate of change of velocity (in m/s) as a function of time (in s) is "acceleration" (in m/s2 – stated "metres per second per second"), which describes how an object's speed and direction of travel change at each point in time.

Acceleration
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acceleration

Gravity gravita grave.gif
A falling ball, in the absence of air resistance, accelerates, i.e. it falls faster and faster.
Common symbol(s): a
SI unit: m / s2
Classical mechanics

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In physics, acceleration is the rate at which the velocity of a body changes with time.[1] In general, velocity and acceleration are vector quantities, with magnitude and direction,[2][3] though in many cases only magnitude is considered (sometimes with negative values for deceleration, treating it as a one dimensional vector). As described by Newton's Second Law, acceleration is caused by a net force; the force, as a vector, is equal to the product of the mass of the object being accelerated (scalar) and the acceleration (vector). The SI unit of acceleration is the meter per second squared (m/s2).

For example, an object such as a car that starts from standstill, then travels in a straight line at increasing speed, is accelerating in the direction of travel. If the car changes direction at constant speedometer reading, there is strictly speaking an acceleration although it is often not so described; passengers in the car will experience a force pushing them back into their seats in linear acceleration, and a sideways force on changing direction. If the speed of the car decreases, it is usual and meaningful to speak of deceleration; mathematically it is acceleration in the opposite direction to that of motion.

Time
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time

Time is a dimension in which events can be ordered from the past through the present into the future,[1][2][3][4][5][6] and also the measure of durations of events and the intervals between them.[3][7][8] Time has long been a major subject of study in religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a manner applicable to all fields without circularity has consistently eluded scholars.[3][7][8][9][10][11] Nevertheless, diverse fields such as business, industry, sports, the sciences, and the performing arts all incorporate some notion of time into their respective measuring systems.[12][13][14] Some simple, relatively uncontroversial definitions of time include "time is what clocks measure"[7][15] and "time is what keeps everything from happening at once".[16][17][18][19]

Two contrasting viewpoints on time divide many prominent philosophers. One view is that time is part of the fundamental structure of the universe — a dimension independent of events, in which events occur in sequence. Sir Isaac Newton subscribed to this realist view, and hence it is sometimes referred to as Newtonian time.[20][21] The opposing view is that time does not refer to any kind of "container" that events and objects "move through", nor to any entity that "flows", but that it is instead part of a fundamental intellectual structure (together with space and number) within which humans sequence and compare events. This second view, in the tradition of Gottfried Leibniz[15] and Immanuel Kant,[22][23] holds that time is neither an event nor a thing, and thus is not itself measurable nor can it be travelled.

Time is one of the seven fundamental physical quantities in the International System of Units. Time is used to define other quantities — such as velocity — so defining time in terms of such quantities would result in circularity of definition.[24] An operational definition of time, wherein one says that observing a certain number of repetitions of one or another standard cyclical event (such as the passage of a free-swinging pendulum) constitutes one standard unit such as the second, is highly useful in the conduct of both advanced experiments and everyday affairs of life. The operational definition leaves aside the question whether there is something called time, apart from the counting activity just mentioned, that flows and that can be measured. Investigations of a single continuum called spacetime bring questions about space into questions about time, questions that have their roots in the works of early students of natural philosophy.

Furthermore, it may be that there is a subjective component to time, but whether or not time itself is "felt", as a sensation or an experience, has never been settled.[3][7][8][25][26]

Temporal measurement has occupied scientists and technologists, and was a prime motivation in navigation and astronomy. Periodic events and periodic motion have long served as standards for units of time. Examples include the apparent motion of the sun across the sky, the phases of the moon, the swing of a pendulum, and the beat of a heart. Currently, the international unit of time, the second, is defined in terms of radiation emitted by caesium atoms (see below). Time is also of significant social importance, having economic value ("time is money") as well as personal value, due to an awareness of the limited time in each day and in human life spans.


now i sound like tom renney


Last edited by Steve BachIntyre: 07-16-2013 at 10:40 PM.
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