View Single Post
Old
02-29-2004, 10:49 AM
  #2
jas
Unsatisfied
 
jas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: NJ
Posts: 13,671
vCash: 500
But who presides over...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laches
Interesting quotes from Demers......

http://www.canada.com/search/story.h...4-f3fafbc1cdab

Is all that ails the Rangers Sather's fault?
Mark Spector
National Post

A day after Glen Sather admitted some degree of defeat in New York, it can now
be said without a doubt: the New York Rangers are the worst-run organization in
North American major professional sports. Bar none. There is no parallel in
any other major-league sport to a Rangers team that holds a vast financial
advantage over 26 of their 29 NHL opponents, yet are destined to set a new low
for futility at the end of this regular season.

If the Calgary Flames -- currently tied for fifth in the West -- qualify for
the post-season and New York does not, as is certain, the Rangers will own the
longest active playoff drought in the National Hockey League with seven
consecutive playoff misses. That's seven years of operating on their own
financial stratosphere above Eastern Conference teams like Ottawa, Tampa Bay,
Buffalo and Carolina, and each season managing to finish in ninth place or
worse.

And while Sather is held accountable for having made absolutely no gains during
his four seasons at the helm -- other than a payroll that has pushed past the
US$80-million mark this season -- he is in a way a microcosm of all that ails
the Rangers.

Signing for a reported annual salary of US$5-million in the summer of 2000,
Sather was past his prime when he joined the Rangers. As general manager and
president, he could have taken the hard road and built his team the old-
fashioned way, but instead took the predictable New York shortcut and simply
attempted to spend his way out of the basement.

Funny. Didn't the big-name players acquired by Sather all ply that same trade?

They signed big-money contracts and stopped playing the style that had made
them attractive to the Rangers originally.

"Too many guys in a comfort zone, with contracts you can't touch," said former
NHL head coach Jacques Demers. "Different coaches have tried there, and it just
doesn't work. There are too many stars there who feel they don't have to work
hard."

Sather said yesterday that there are not any no-trade contracts on his roster,
hinting at the most humbling reversal in fortunes, whereby the Rangers will
approach the March 9 trading deadline looking to unload some big contracts and
bring in a prospect or draft picks in return.

His dilemma, though, is nothing short of hilarious: unless Sather can find a
way to sit on the other side of the table, swooning over the aged and overpaid,
who on Earth is he going to make a deal with?

"I see them play 30 games a year. A lot of their players are selfish," Demers
said. "Mark Messier is a hard-working player. To be involved with some of those
players, who don't want to work hard and just want to pick up a paycheque, I
feel sorry for Mark.

"It's a nonchalant attitude. A country club. Glen, I have a lot of respect for
him as a coach. I still maintain that Glen Sather was an awesome hockey man at
one point. Has it passed him by? I don't know."

The fact remains, though, that all those overpaid, under-hustling Rangers were
legitimate NHL stars at one point in their careers. The unanswered question is,
what happens to them when they go to New York?
the country club? GLEN SATHER!!!!

jas is offline