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Explaining the Code for homework

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Old
12-02-2007, 02:24 PM
  #1
ki11joy
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Explaining the Code for homework

I know it's sort of taboo to discuss the Code, but this homework assignment I have about the code of chivalry and the Middle Ages is practically begging for a discussion of this. Remember that my school doesn't really care for hockey and misunderstand the inner workings of fighting and enforcing, so I'm trying my best to make it easier for those people to get the point of it all.

I have to tell you that this was really difficult to do because for me, it really comes from the heart and it's hard to translate that onto paper, especially for a crowd that doesn't understand the sport. So I'd like to hear your opinions on this and how I could explain it better. At worst, it at least lets everyone know that hockey isn't just about fighting and that there are reasons behind it.

Quote:
Compare the code of chivalry to ideas about “good sportsmanship” today.
The code of chivalry can be easily compared to “the Code” of the NHL. It's an unwritten honor system of fighting and enforcing that govern the players. It demands respect for everyone and the fact that if one team member, especially a smaller one or one who is in a defenseless position is attacked, an enforcer comes out to send a message and make sure that it doesn't happen again, just like law enforcement. Fighting is often used to literally hammer that message home and show their team that that kind of behavior will not be tolerated and there will be retaliation. It's used to defend the star players and make sure things don't get out of hand. When fighting is done in those situations, it's often between two established enforcers and is agreed upon mutually in a respectful way. In fact, there may even be times when one person declines the offer just as one defenseman did in a game because his team was already down a man and he didn't want to put his team in a hard spot, and the other man accepted that and they didn't fight.
Unlike any other sport, it allows the players to police the game and defend their teammates. That's why scrums and shoving matches are allowed after the whistle. It's why whenever goalies get slashed at or someone runs into them, which is a huge no-no because they're so vulnerable, the players take matters into their own hands. It's why whenever a player gets injured, his teammates immediately go to the guy who caused it and start the pushing and yelling. If those moments and fights weren't allowed, it would become much more dangerous because a cocky, disrespectful player could potentially injure an important player with an illegal check because he wouldn't be punished by that team's fighters. It's instilled in players at a young age that stuff like that is unacceptable and that there are consequences. With fighting allowed, it embarrasses said cocky player if he doesn't want to fight because he's a coward who's out to headhunt, and faces more problems for not defending his actions and manning up. Having enforcers helps eliminates those types of people.
This honor system of protection, intimidation, and retaliation is probably the most misunderstood, yet best example of sportsmanship. It means that respect, honor, and integrity are expected of everyone, and that's why there are enforcers out there to uphold the Code and protect it, as well as their team. Too many other sports focus on the individual, while hockey is one of the few that really stresses the collective whole and how one plays for the logo on the front, not the name on the back. That's what it's all about, and the sooner more people realize that, the more they will appreciate the beauty of hockey.

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12-02-2007, 02:57 PM
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CharlieGirl
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Good job. Bill Clement said it this way on the broadcast:

Quote:
"That's one of the big differences in this Flyers team. If you touch one of them, you touch a family member. And you got the family coming at you like a bunch of piranhas on raw meat in a swimming pool. And you've got a problem at that point."

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12-02-2007, 04:35 PM
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ki11joy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie_Girl View Post
Good job. Bill Clement said it this way on the broadcast:
Thanks for the quote. I worked that into the end of my revised answer.

Quote:
Compare the code of chivalry to ideas about “good sportsmanship” today.
The code of chivalry can be easily compared to “the Code” of the NHL. It's an unwritten honor system of fighting and enforcing that governs the players. It demands respect from everyone and the fact that if one team member, especially a smaller one or one who is in a defenseless position is attacked, an enforcer comes out to send a message and make sure that it doesn't happen again, just like law enforcement. Fighting is often used to literally hammer that message home and show their team that that kind of behavior will not be tolerated and there will be retaliation. It's used to defend the star players and make sure things don't get out of hand. When fighting is done in those situations, it's often between two established enforcers and is agreed upon mutually in a respectful way. In fact, there may even be times when one person declines the offer just as one man did in a game because his team was already down a guy and didn't want to put his team in a difficult position. As a result, the two didn't fight.
Unlike any other sport, it allows the players to police the game and defend their teammates. That's why scrums and shoving matches are allowed after the whistle. It's why whenever goalies get slashed at or someone runs into them, which is a huge no-no because they're so vulnerable, the players take matters into their own hands. It's why whenever a player gets injured, his teammates immediately go to the guy who caused it and start the pushing and yelling. If those moments and fights weren't allowed, it would become much more dangerous because a cocky player could potentially injure another with an illegal check and go unpunished because the fighters wouldn't be allowed to fight and therefore defend their team. It's instilled in players at a young age that stuff like that is unacceptable and that there are consequences. With fighting allowed, it embarrasses that type of player if he doesn't want to man up to his actions. Having enforcers helps eliminate those kinds of people.
This honor system of protection, intimidation, and retaliation is probably the most misunderstood, yet best example of sportsmanship. It means that respect, honor, and integrity are expected of everyone, and that's why there are enforcers out there to uphold the Code and protect it, as well as their team. Too many other sports focus on the individual, while hockey is one of the few that really stresses the collective whole and how one plays for the logo on the front, not the name on the back. That's what it's all about, and the sooner more people realize that, the more they will appreciate the beauty of hockey.

“If you touch one of them, you touch a family member. And you got the family coming at you like a bunch of piranhas on raw meat in a swimming pool. And you've got a problem at that point.” -Bill Clement

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