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Players with the most out of the ordinary season

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Old
12-30-2007, 06:00 PM
  #76
raleh
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Originally Posted by FissionFire View Post
Jacques Ricard: Selected #2 overall by the Atlanta Flames, he was a bust from the beginning until ending up in Quebec on a line with Peter and Anton Stastny. He posted a 52-51-103 season and a 2-4-6 playoffs in 5 games. 2 seasons later he was out of the NHL for good. His 347 career points are the lowest of any player in NHL history to have a 100point season. He also scored only 4 other playoff points in 30 games.

Steve Penney: Career minor leaguer who broke into the show with a great 1983-84 playoffs with Montreal. He carried that into a 26-18-8 rookie season and had Habs fans comparing him to Dryden. Next season a rookie by the name of Patrick Roy took his job and 3 years later he was out of the NHL.

Vladimir Ruzicka: After playing in Czechoslovakia for several years, the Bruins brought him over and he was an instant success. His 39 goals and 18 PPGs were tops on the team and his 75 points was second only to Bourque. He was given the Dufresne Trophy (awarded to the best Bruin). His uninspired play the next season led to the team leaving him unprotected in the expansion draft and when he wasn't selected GM Mike Milbury didn't even tender the RFA an offer sheet. He later signed with the Senators but was ordered off the ice during practice 42 games into the season and had his 2-year contract bought out. He never played in the NHL again.

Blaine Lacher: Started with a bang for the Bruins, going 9-2-1 in 1995 and finishing the season 19-11-2 with a 2.41GAA and earned the nickname "Lach-ness Monster". He flopped in the playoffs and was back in the minors next season after a 2-5-2 start. He blamed the media for his demotion, and vowed to show them that their new nickname for him of "Let'em in Lacher" was wrong. He won only 1 game the rest of his career and was out of hockey by 1997.

Scott Bjugstad: Scored 11 goals in his first 79 games before being placed on a line with Neal Broten and Dino Ciccarelli in 1985-86. He had a monster season, scoring 43 goals and 76 points and getting a 3year contract extension. He followed that up with a 4 goal, 13 point season in 86-87 and after that a series of minor injuries plagued him. He scored 57% of his career goals and 53% of his career points in that single season.

Gerry Heffernan: One of many WW1 one-season stars (along with guys like Joe Shack, Sam Lopresti, Steve Wojciechowski, and Frank McCool) who had career seasons with many of the NHLers off fighting the war. He had 5 goals in 40 career games heading into the 1943-44 season but scored 28 goals and 48 points in 43 games for the Habs. He never played another game in the NHL after that (but he did star on the "Razzle Dazzle" line in the Quebec Senior League

Kjell Dahlin: Playing on a line with Bobby Smith and Mats Naslund, he had the Calder all but won in 1985-86 for Montreal before hitting the wall (he'd only played 36 game seasons in Sweden) and finished third in voting. Despite that he still led all rookies with 36 goals and had 71 points. Flopped as a sophomore with only 20 points in 40 games and followed that up with a 25 point in 48 season season. Three years after almost taking the Calder, he was back in Sweden and never played another NHL game.

Ken Hodge: Before you ask how a 300+ goal scorer could be on the list, it's not him. It's his son. He posted a stellar rookie campaign in 1990-91 of 39 goals and 59 points and had Bruins fans thinking that the son would follow in the fathers footsteps of greatness with the team. Sadly, he would never come close. He showed up to camp badly out of shape and was demoted during the season. He finished with 6 goals and 17 points. He was traded to Tampa Bay and appeared in only 25 more games. Outside of his stellar rookie season, he scored only 9 goals and 28 points in 72 games.

Chris Valentine: Broke onto the scene in 1981-82 with a 30 goal and 67 point rookie season in only 60 games. Like Hodge, poor work ethic led to his rapid decline. 3 years after his tremedous rookie season he was playing for Duesseldorf in Europe and never played in the NHL again. Outside of his rookie year he scored only 13 goal and 28 points in 45 games.
Heffernan played on the razzle dazzle line with Buddy O'connor as his centre. When Heffernan came up he came up with the whole line. O'connor was the only one who stuck, likely because it became obvious that Heffernan and Morin were products of his great play making.

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Old
12-31-2007, 05:35 AM
  #77
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Old
12-31-2007, 02:36 PM
  #78
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Bernie Nichols? He was a good player, but leeched off superstars for a long time.
He played 1001 games without Gretzky, and scored nearly 1000 points. Hardly a one year wonder.

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12-31-2007, 02:40 PM
  #79
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He played 1001 games without Gretzky, and scored nearly 1000 points. Hardly a one year wonder.
Based on his season with Gretzky, he could have been close to 2000. The point is, 150 points was a one year spike that is worthy of noting. It is all relative. Why is is more relevant to have a 40 point guy score 100 or a 30 point guy score 70? A 75 point guy scoring 150 is the same kind of one year wonder.

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12-31-2007, 03:59 PM
  #80
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Based on his season with Gretzky, he could have been close to 2000. The point is, 150 points was a one year spike that is worthy of noting. It is all relative. Why is is more relevant to have a 40 point guy score 100 or a 30 point guy score 70? A 75 point guy scoring 150 is the same kind of one year wonder.
Generally Nicholls was more than a 75 point man. You dont get 100+ points three times by accident

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12-31-2007, 04:46 PM
  #81
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Generally Nicholls was more than a 75 point man. You dont get 100+ points three times by accident
The year before he played with Gretzky he put up 78 points. The year after he played with Gretzky he put up 73. He may have scored 100 at a certain point but, during that time, Gretzky helped him double his output.

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