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Playing up

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Old
01-15-2008, 08:41 AM
  #1
Puckboy
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Playing up

What are the advantages and disadvantages of playing up a level?

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01-15-2008, 09:22 AM
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Synergy27
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That depends on how you define "up a level".

The stock answer to this question would be that playing against superior opponents will in turn make you a better player, but that is not always true. My first advice would be to make sure that you have reached a point where it has simply become obvious that you do not belong in the level you are in anymore. If you are not dominating at the level you are at, you don't really stand much to gain by going against even stiffer competition, in my opinion.

You also run the risk of:

1. Getting your ass kicked.
2. Pissing off your new teammates if you end up dragging the higher level team down.
3. Getting hurt/hurting someone.

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01-15-2008, 10:19 AM
  #3
WhipNash27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by synergy27 View Post
That depends on how you define "up a level".

The stock answer to this question would be that playing against superior opponents will in turn make you a better player, but that is not always true. My first advice would be to make sure that you have reached a point where it has simply become obvious that you do not belong in the level you are in anymore. If you are not dominating at the level you are at, you don't really stand much to gain by going against even stiffer competition, in my opinion.

You also run the risk of:

1. Getting your ass kicked.
2. Pissing off your new teammates if you end up dragging the higher level team down.
3. Getting hurt/hurting someone.
Pretty much sums it up. Of course it depends on how big of a jump it is from one level to another. For example, If your D league and C2 league isn't too much of a jump and you are a pretty good D player, then C2 may not be too bad and you could end up playing better or just becoming better than if you stayed at D. Also playing with better players may help you play better. Sometimes it gets frustrating playing with players who can hardly skate.

I know where I play the difference between a C2 & C1 team is huge. I'm a fairly decent player at a C2 level, but at C1 I know I'd get romped.

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01-15-2008, 10:45 AM
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I have a bit of experience in this.

In the past 5 years I've played 3 different levels of beer league hockey.

- beginner. I played defense and averaged over 2 points per game. On some night, I could literally go end-to-end whenever I felt like it and had a chance to score on every rush.

- intermediate - played centre in a decent beer league where I was one of the better players on the team but above average league wide. I scored on a goal-per-game clip but it wasn't a cake-walk every night

- difficult - this is the league I play in now. The average player is probably between major travel and some form of junior. We even had a couple of former NHLers playing in the league at one time. Players are rated from 1A to 4 (1A being best, 4 being worst) and I'm easily a 4 in this league.

The good and bad is this - the beginner league was fun because I was a superstar. It felt great being the go-to guy and having the team look to me to help them win games. But I didn't improve at all.
The intermediate was good because it was challenging but I still saw myself improve somewhat and I was a contributor to my team.

In the league I'm in now, it's good in that I have been forced to improve greatly. I was actually going to quit after the first couple of games because I was so garbage compare to everyone else. But because of how good the league is I was forced to improve in some areas and now I'm in the top 25 scorers. I'm still one of the worst players in the league (skill wise) but I've learned to make due with what I can and can't do in this league and it's helped me. I'm definitely a better player for playing in this league.
But it still sucks at times knowing that I'll never be a superstar or someone that the team looks to help them win games.

So there you have it. The good and bad for 3 different leagues.

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Old
01-15-2008, 06:22 PM
  #5
Puckboy
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Sorry I should have given more info. It is going from Mite hockey to squirts for a goalie. Still needs work. Trys hard and is learning the position but still needs work. He is not the guy who wins the games for the team, but is steady.

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