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Atd#8-MLII ***The All-Time AAA Draft *** (picks, rosters, everything in this thread)

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Old
02-15-2008, 07:54 PM
  #76
chaosrevolver
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Burke is the shutdown D-man who we wanted to go with our 3 great offensive forwards. This is the perfect pick for us.

Career:
GM: 494
G: 19
A: 47
P: 66
PIM: 560

Awards:
- Two Stanley Cups ('29, '30)

Complete shut down d-man with cup experience and we are glad to have him.

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02-15-2008, 08:24 PM
  #77
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Originally Posted by Transplanted Caper View Post
The Bulldogs select Forward Russ Courtnall
He was actually going to be my next pick. Good choice TC.

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02-16-2008, 10:39 AM
  #78
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The Falcons are proud to select RW Rejean Houle.

The duo of Rejean Houle and Marc Tardif had made national headlines as the two best junior hockey players in Canada in 1969. The only question was who would be the first pick overall in the draft. And, even that turned out to be rather anti-climactic because as it happened the Montreal Canadiens were the automatic beneficiaries of both picks, thanks to a bizarre clause in the NHL rule books at the time which stated the Canadiens had the option of first right of claim with respect to two players whose fathers are French-Canadians and domiciled in the province of Quebec, at the time of the draft.

The Canadiens selected Houle first and Tardif second. Needless to say, this strange form of favouritism did not sit well with the other teams around the league, who felt the draft should be based entirely on league standings. Houle had completed two strong offensive seasons with the Juniors. In 1968-69, he averaged exactly two points per game, scoring 53 goals and 55 assists fn 54 games for 108 points. Tardif, by comparison, had 72 points in 51 games.

With the honour of being a number-one draft pick also comes a tremendous amount of pressure, especially in hockey-crazy Montreal. Houle certainly felt that pressure and was held to just nine games with the Canadiens, scoring a single point. The rest of the season he played in the AHL with the Montreal Voyageurs, where he had 25 points in 27 games.

Houle played three more seasons with the Canadiens, and although he played on two Stanley Cup winning teams, in 1971 and 1973, and showed improvement in his game every year, it never seemed fast enough for Habs' fans or the local media, who had expected much greater things from their first overall pick of four years earlier.

The arrival of the WHA looked tempting to Houle, and he opted to leave the Montreal microscope and join the new league with the Quebec Nordiques. That seemed to anger the Canadiens' fans even more, but Houle felt he really had no option but to play elsewhere. During his three years in the WHA, Houle enjoyed a great deal of success, improving upon his offensive stats each year. In 1975-76, he scored 51 goals and 52 assists for 103 points in 81 games.

Houle had a new-found confidence in his game, and at the age of 27, felt he was ready to re-enter the Montreal powderkeg to stand up to his critics. He rejoined the Canadiens in 1976-77 and scored 52 points in 65 games. Houle and the Habs had a successful run through the playoffs, defending their Cup championship from a year earlier by beating the Boston Bruins in the finals. The two clubs met again in the 1978 finals, with the same result. In 1979, Montreal won their fourth Cup in a row, beating the New York Rangers in the final four-games-to-one. Houle played another four years with the Canadiens, retiring after 16 games into the 1982-83 season at the age of 33. In eleven years with the Montreal Canadiens, Houle had won five Stanley Cup rings.

After retiring, Houle became an executive with a national brewing company before being offered the job as general manager of the Montreal Canadiens. Just six weeks into the job, Houle was faced with a monumental crisis. Montreal's star goaltender Patrick Roy, who had been feuding with head coach Mario Tremblay, and soon after being yanked from a game, told team president Ronald Corey that he had just played his final game for Montreal. The television cameras caught the entire episode, with a stunned looking Corey sitting in the front row in disbelief and Tremblay staring off into space. The situation was unfixable, so Houle traded Roy and captain Mike Keane to the Colorado Avalanche for goalie Jocelyn Thibault, Andrei Kovalenko, and Martin Rucinsky in what was the biggest trade in Montreal Canadiens' history.

Houle served as general manager until being replaced by Andre Savard in 2000.

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02-16-2008, 11:24 AM
  #79
vancityluongo
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Originally Posted by Johnny O View Post
The Falcons are proud to select RW Rejean Houle.
Solid, solid pick. I don't know how he slipped out of the MLD, but he's definitely one of the best RW's in the draft.

Alfredshems IK take G Byron Dafoe. More later.

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02-16-2008, 11:49 AM
  #80
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Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
Solid, solid pick. I don't know how he slipped out of the MLD, but he's definitely one of the best RW's in the draft. Alfredshems IK take G Byron Dafoe. More later.
Thanks! Nice pick yourself. We took a retro Selke award winner in the 4th round.


Last edited by Hawkman: 02-18-2008 at 10:47 PM.
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Old
02-16-2008, 12:02 PM
  #81
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Chicago selects RW-Billy Hicke

Bill Hicke was a compact, fleet-footed skater who, as a junior with the Regina Pats, could put the puck in the net in a big way. After four seasons of scoring glory as an amateur, he turned pro in the Canadiens' organization with the Rochester Americans in 1958-59. It was there that he won the Dudley "Red" Garrett Memorial Award as the league's top rookie.

Misfortune, however, awaited Hicke, at the Montreal Forum. Rocket Richard had just retired in 1960, leaving a large hole in the club's roster and in the hearts of fans who ached for a replacement. Bill Hicke, the junior "phenom," received billing as the antidote.

Naturally there was little Hicke could do to fulfill such expectations. He simply took advantage of the limited ice time he could steal away. During his six and a half seasons with the club, he did manage to score a modestly respectable number of points each year. But by 1964, his usefulness to the club had worn thin. As a frequent guest on the bench, he requested a trade and had his wish fulfilled almost immediately with a ticket to New York.

His arrival in the Big Apple was not very auspicious, however. While on a golf outing during training camp, Hicke got chilled in the damp, cool weather. Afterwards he began to feel ill. The first wave of medical treatment he received missed the mark. Soon afterwards, he fell into a coma for two weeks. After returning to consciousness, he emerged with a sizeable list of allergies including bronchial asthma?a condition that would raise its restrictive head from time to time to limit his career prospects.

All told, he lasted just over two seasons with the Rangers. He was pleased to find out that the Oakland Seals had claimed his rights in the Expansion Draft of 1967. Hicke never liked the city of New York and was glad to move on after putting mediocre results onto the score sheet. In Oakland, he got plenty of ice time and an opportunity to net his best offensive numbers. The price, however, was to struggle with an inept team at the bottom of the league's standings. -Legends of hockey

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Old
02-16-2008, 12:06 PM
  #82
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Antigonish selects D. Trent Yawney


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He played some of his best hockey as a member of coach Dave King's Canadian National Team. Yawney was not an overly physical player, but he was a strong skater with a good positional game so he was not a liability in the defensive zone. He had enough offensive ability to average 15 to 20 points season. Yawney has over 200 games of international hockey experience on his resume, including the 1988 Olympics and the World Championships of 1991 and 1992.

Yawney was a solid defenseman for the Blackhawks from 1988 until he was traded to Calgary in 1991 where he spent the next five seasons. In 1996 he signed with the St. Louis Blues and played there for one season before returning to Chicago, signing with the Blackhawks as a free agent, in 1997.

He injured his arm in a game against the Colorado Avalanche on January 9, 1999, and announced his retirement the following month after a twelve-year NHL career.

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02-16-2008, 02:02 PM
  #83
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The Niagara Falls Americanadians are very happy to select Forward: Buzz Boll.

Frank "Buzz" Boll was a fast skating left-winger who demonstrated an ability to score during a career that lasted eleven full seasons. He reached double figures in goals eight times and was considered one of the most consistent players in the league.

Born in Filmore, Saskatchewan, Boll excelled with such clubs as the Weyburn Wanderers, Regina Pats, and Weyburn Beavers before he joined the senior Toronto Marlboros in 1931-32. After gaining valuable pro experience with the IAHL's Syracuse Stars, Boll joined the Toronto Maple Leafs on a regular basis in 1933-34.

As a rookie, the young forward witnessed the Bailey-Shore incident and participated in the subsequent benefit game. Boll was a solid player for the club through the late 1930s and often played on the same line with Bill Thoms and Bob Davidson. In May 1939, Boll and Busher Jackson were the key players sent to the New York Americans for Sweeney Schriner. Boll spent three years in New York, including the franchise's last season in 1941-42 when it was based in Brooklyn.

Following the demise of the Americans, Boll's rights were transferred to the Boston Bruins in the Special Dispersal Draw. The veteran winger was teamed with Bill Cowley and Art Jackson and produced a career best 25 goals. Boll played one more year in the Black and Gold before retiring in 1944.


NHL Career:
GM: 437
G: 133
A: 130
P: 263
PIM: 148

Awards:
NHL All Star Game (1934)

Records:
8-Time Double Figure in Goals (11 Seasons)
7-Time Double Figure in Assists (11 Seasons)
7-Time 20+ Point Player (11 Seasons)
96 Points in 82 Games with the Boston Bruins
10 Point in 9 Game performance in the 1936 Playoffs for Toronto

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Old
02-16-2008, 02:03 PM
  #84
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Regina selects C Len Thornson. This big center is the now defunct IHL's all-time scoring leader with 1252 points in just 763 games. He played in the original six era where it was very difficult to get onto one of the top two lines of any NHL team. This gentlemanly player had only 101 AHL penalty minutes in his entire career. On two occasions, 1960-61 and 1966-67, Thornson was just a few points shy of that elusive "Two points per game" mark.

His playoff history is equally impressive. In 64 career games, he scored 40 goals (exceeding his career average in the regular season) and 88 points.

He is a six-time winner of the IHL's James Gatschene Memorial Trophy as the IHL's MVP, over a ten year span. He is also a three-time winner of the Leo Lamoreux Memorial Trophy as the IHL's leading scorer during that span.

Wikipedia states that Jock Callander passed his points record in 2000, but hockeydb shows Thornson ahead by 10 points. In any case, Thornson did it in many fewer games.

Thornson will be our 2nd line center and will either feed the puck to established NHLers or minor league scrubs. We are sure he will be successful either way.

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02-16-2008, 02:07 PM
  #85
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The Kings select D Lubomir Visnovsky.

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02-16-2008, 02:31 PM
  #86
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Regina selects C Len Thornson. This big center is the now defunct IHL's all-time scoring leader with 1252 points in just 763 games. He played in the original six era where it was very difficult to get onto one of the top two lines of any NHL team. This gentlemanly player had only 101 AHL penalty minutes in his entire career. On two occasions, 1960-61 and 1966-67, Thornson was just a few points shy of that elusive "Two points per game" mark.

His playoff history is equally impressive. In 64 career games, he scored 40 goals (exceeding his career average in the regular season) and 88 points.

He is a six-time winner of the IHL's James Gatschene Memorial Trophy as the IHL's MVP, over a ten year span. He is also a three-time winner of the Leo Lamoreux Memorial Trophy as the IHL's leading scorer during that span.

Wikipedia states that Jock Callander passed his points record in 2000, but hockeydb shows Thornson ahead by 10 points. In any case, Thornson did it in many fewer games.

Thornson will be our 2nd line center and will either feed the puck to established NHLers or minor league scrubs. We are sure he will be successful either way.
Nice find. Although in a weak league, having well above a PPG average over the course of your career is pretty impressive.

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02-16-2008, 02:39 PM
  #87
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The Blades select D Jim Dorey.

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Dorey was picked up from Toronto, where the aggressive rearguard made some impressions with his rugged play over 4 NHL seasons. None other than the legendary Tim Horton had predicted big things for Dorey, which was one reason the Rangers acquired him in exchange for Pierre Jarry.
...
He was named to the post season all star team in 1973, his first season in the Association, after scoring 7 goals and 63 points in 75 games. He also led all WHA scorers in assists in the playoffs with 16 in 15 games. Same goes for his 41 penalty minutes.

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Old
02-16-2008, 03:34 PM
  #88
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He was actually a pretty good defensive forward. Played RW on the best checking line in the league with McPhee and Carbonneau. Good enough to be a two-way line RW in the MLD.

Didn't reach his offensive potential on a consistent basis. He should have been a perennial 40-goal guy. He reached that level once. Great speed. Bullet shot. Great offensive ability and creativity. One of his biggest offensive weaknesses: he didn't use his shot enough.

There is no way that older brother Geoff should have finished with 70 more goals.
Russ tended to shy away of any kind of physical contact.
He was ridiculously fast... And thought hockey was more than an offensive game. That was the reason why he played defense.

Nicknamed "The Deer" by Pat Burns. Not exactly a kind nickname.

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02-16-2008, 04:12 PM
  #89
seventieslord
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Russ tended to shy away of any kind of physical contact.
He was ridiculously fast... And thought hockey was more than an offensive game. That was the reason why he played defense.

Nicknamed "The Deer" by Pat Burns. Not exactly a kind nickname.
That's how I remember him too. Pretty soft, physically. Great wheels, good offensively, and responsible defensively. Kinda like a Thomas Steen, but faster.

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02-16-2008, 04:28 PM
  #90
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
That's how I remember him too. Pretty soft, physically. Great wheels, good offensively, and responsible defensively. Kinda like a Thomas Steen, but faster.
skilled defensively but NOT responsible defensively: he was RECKLESS, getting benched for most of a game for making risky passes that were intercepted, surges at inopportune times... Russ Courtnall really wasn't a 'responsible' sort of guy

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02-16-2008, 04:29 PM
  #91
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
That's how I remember him too. Pretty soft, physically. Great wheels, good offensively, and responsible defensively. Kinda like a Thomas Steen, but faster.
skilled defensively but NOT responsible defensively: he was RECKLESS, getting benched for most of a game for making risky passes that were intercepted, surges at inopportune times... Russ Courtnall really wasn't a 'responsible' sort of guy: a coach's nightmare sometimes.

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02-16-2008, 05:12 PM
  #92
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Ron Murphy


205 goals, 479 points in 889 NHL games over an injury-filled 18 year career with four teams (Rangers, Blackhawks, Red Wings, Bruins).
Chicago Blackhawk champion
NHL all-star game (1961)
Memorial Cup champion (1952)

Harry Howell on that Guelph Bitmores championship team:
Quote:
"Andy Bathgate, Dean Prentice, Ron Murphy, Louie Fontinato — we all keep in touch. We're all close by. That has completed the bond."
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/html/...onep197901.htm

Quote:
...secured his name in hockey folklore when he got involved in a vicious stick-swinging incident with Montreal's Bernie Geoffrion. Murphy suffered a broken jaw and a league suspension. The incident also put Maurice Richard in trouble with the league when he defended Geoffrion's actions in a newspaper column.

...Rangers traded him to Chicago, a popular place to send the discontented and troublesome in those days. In trying to get rid of their troublemakers, the other teams were setting the stage for a surge by the Blackhawks.

The 'Hawks broke out in the 1961 playoffs. Chicago rolled over the regular season champions, Montreal Canadiens. In the finals, they took Detroit in six games to win the Stanley Cup. Murphy peaked with the team and even had the honour of representing the club in the All-Star Game.

Murphy went on to join the Red Wings for the 1964-65 season before being dealt to the Boston Bruins the next year. With the Bruins, he began experiencing health troubles.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=13807

How many NHLers are talked out of retiring in their 17th season and go on to have a career best year on the highest scoring line ever (to that date)? That is what you call a valuable player!



Quote:
Twice the Bruins talked him out of retiring. In 1968-69, Murphy was put on a line with Ken Hodge and an emerging Phil Esposito. The line racked up an incredible 263 points--a record to that point.
Quote:
on a wild train ride from Boston to Montreal, Bobby Hull and teammate Ron Murphy broke into a case of railroad flares, lit them and threw them into the other Black Hawks' roomettes. Several frantic hours and $599 worth of damage later, General Manager Tommy Ivan called a team meeting. "All right," demanded Ivan, "who did it?" "I decided somebody better say something," says Bobby, "so I piped up: 'I did, sir.' Ivan just said, That's all I wanted to know,' and walked away."
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...1234-8,00.html

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02-16-2008, 05:59 PM
  #93
pappyline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post

Ron Murphy


205 goals, 479 points in 889 NHL games over an injury-filled 18 year career with four teams (Rangers, Blackhawks, Red Wings, Bruins).
Chicago Blackhawk champion
NHL all-star game (1961)
Memorial Cup champion (1952)

Harry Howell on that Guelph Bitmores championship team:

http://www.legendsofhockey.net/html/...onep197901.htm


http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=13807

How many NHLers are talked out of retiring in their 17th season and go on to have a career best year on the highest scoring line ever (to that date)? That is what you call a valuable player!






http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...1234-8,00.html
Van, You stole my next pick. Probably the only player from the 61 Hawk cup team that hadn't been picked yet. Love the Flare story. One I hadn't heard before.

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Old
02-16-2008, 06:05 PM
  #94
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Van, You stole my next pick. Probably the only player from the 61 Hawk cup team that hadn't been picked yet. Love the Flare story. One I hadn't heard before.
Mine too. That's the second LW you've taken from me VanI.

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02-16-2008, 06:14 PM
  #95
VanIslander
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Love the Flare story. One I hadn't heard before.
New to me too. I really enjoy learning about the history of hockey in researching picks because it's full of interesting stories. The hockey world nowadays is downright boring in comparison.

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02-16-2008, 06:26 PM
  #96
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That's the second LW you've taken from me VanI.
Wait until tomorrow.

The left wing I'm gonna draft then will make your jaw drop and say "I thought he was already drafted!" or "How could I forgotten him!" or "You did it again. Robber!"

Mark it.

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02-16-2008, 06:38 PM
  #97
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The hockey world nowadays is downright boring in comparison.
Too much media pressue, IMHO. Can you imagine Crosby doing something like that, with the media spotlight all around him? I can bet that if there wasn't that kind of media attention, you'd see guys like Ovechkin doing those things on a regular basis.

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02-16-2008, 06:43 PM
  #98
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Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
Too much media pressue, IMHO. Can you imagine Crosby doing something like that, with the media spotlight all around him? I can bet that if there wasn't that kind of media attention, you'd see guys like Ovechkin doing those things on a regular basis.
Yeah, and with television creating more of a youthful fan base than blue-collar workers going to games, players are more 'role models' than ever. Add to that the fact that they are millionaires nowadays so they have a lot more to loose.

The major professional sports are becoming fossilized. It's the new and fringe sports with devout fan bases but little profit where the true heart of sport lies.

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02-16-2008, 07:01 PM
  #99
chaosrevolver
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Hmm...I wonder who it is.


Last edited by chaosrevolver: 02-16-2008 at 07:08 PM.
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02-16-2008, 07:12 PM
  #100
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Yeah, and with television creating more of a youthful fan base than blue-collar workers going to games, players are more 'role models' than ever. Add to that the fact that they are millionaires nowadays so they have a lot more to loose.

The major professional sports are becoming fossilized. It's the new and fringe sports with devout fan bases but little profit where the true heart of sport lies.
Yup. It's kind of sad really. Can you imagine a personality like JR back in the 50's? That would beat any ****ing show on MTV or Fox or CBS or whatever.

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