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What type of player was Mario Marois like to the fans?

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Old
04-13-2017, 06:46 AM
  #1
Michael Whiteacre
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What type of player was Mario Marois like to the fans?

Mario Marois is a blueliner from 1977-78 to 1991-92 whom nobody talks about anymore these days, since he wasn't a flashy performer, but at least a solid player.

He joined the NHL in the late 1970s when he played for the New York Rangers. He went on to make his first and only Stanley Cup Finals appearance in '78-'79 for Broadway when they lost to the Montreal Canadiens, but missed out on another deep playoff run for N.Y. in '80-'81 as the Rangers traded him to Vancouver, who then traded him to the Quebec Nordiques for his first stint with the franchise.

Three of his four best NHL seasons from an overall standpoint by his standards have to be with the Quebec Nordiques in his first stint from '80-'81 to halfway through '85-'86, especially '83-'84 would prove to be Mario Marois' best overall NHL season, as he posted 13 goals, 36 assists for 49 points and an impressive +/- rating of +51 that put Marois in consideration for the 1984 NHL All-Star Game berth as a potential representative for Quebec, in addition to being considered for the 1983-84 James Norris Trophy, which was ultimately won by Rod Langway of the Washington Capitals.

And then Mario Marois' only best overall NHL season without being a member of the Nordiques had to be in '87-'88 with the Winnipeg Jets in his first stint with the franchise from '85-'86 to '88-'89 when they sent him back to Quebec via trade. His best overall non-Quebec season saw him score 7 goals and 44 goals for 51 points to go with a +/- rating of +5 which once again earned Marois at least being in consideration for the 1988 NHL All-Star Game berth as a potential representative for Winnipeg, in addition to being considered for the 1987-88 James Norris Trophy that eventually went to Ray Bourque of the Boston Bruins.

After his first stint with Winnipeg, Mario Marois spent the remainder of his NHL career bouncing around between the Quebec Nordiques (2nd stint from '88-'89 to '89-'90), St. Louis Blues ('90-'91 to '91-'92) and the Winnipeg Jets (2nd stint for half of '91-'92). Mario Marois did have a second stint with the Vancouver Canucks in '92-'93, but he spent time playing for their farm team, the AHL Hamilton Canucks instead of suiting up for the team in '92-'93 in what would've been Marois' second stint in Vancouver, as a player-coach before retiring at the conclusion of the '92-'93 season.

Quebec became a decent playoff contender with Mario Marois in his first stint with the team, while they had fallen down to the NHL cellar basement when Quebec already re-acquired him from Winnipeg in '88-'89.

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Old
04-13-2017, 07:26 AM
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psycat
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Now that's a name... you know the rest.

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04-13-2017, 11:18 AM
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Marois was a soild offensive defenceman. When he got in trouble it was usually his defensive lapses. A modern day comparable might be Torey Krug, although Marois was not as small relative to the players of his era as Krug is.

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04-13-2017, 12:30 PM
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Killion
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Originally Posted by psycat View Post
Now that's a name... you know the rest.
Yeah, I can still hear that name rolling off Danny Gallivans tongue during the infamous Battle of Quebec Playoff & Regular Season tilts. Some of the best hockey Ive ever
witnessed. Marois had an offensive edge to him, great shot, and no problem playing it rugged. Native of QC who'd played (and starred) his Junior up there. Hometown Hero.

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04-13-2017, 03:18 PM
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A guy any team would be happy to have in their top 4. If he's on your 1st pairing you're probably looking for an upgrade, but if you can't find it, you could do worse.

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04-14-2017, 09:12 AM
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Michael Whiteacre
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It's like the golden shine had worn off of Mario Marois once he returned to Quebec in December 1988 for a second stint, and Quebec thought they could restore him back to his '83-'84 self but ended up getting the shell of a performer whose defensive lapses got worse than ever before.

Sure, Mario Marois even became a full-time defensive minded, stay-at-home type of blueliner when he moved on to the St. Louis Blues from '90-'91 to part of '91-'92 before he re-joined the Winnipeg Jets for his second stint, far from the guy who was in consideration for at least two All-Star nods and two occasions of consideration for the James Norris Trophy, once in Quebec and once in Winnipeg; but Marois wasn't even fully able to utilize his offensive edge and shots on opposition's net anymore.


Last edited by Michael Whiteacre: 04-14-2017 at 09:38 AM.
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04-15-2017, 09:29 AM
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I used to go to Canuck games all the time with my father...

It was the 80-81 season, and the Rag's were in town.
I was still just a very young boy. Both my dad and I were largely unfamiliar with Marios and his game.

Well, he made everyone in the Pacific Coliseum take notice that night. He was such a crazy crap disturber that night (he also had a very effective game). He had everyone in the building booing him at every turn because he was such a pain in the arse that night.

The Canucks traded for him after that game; about 2 weeks later the Nucks played the Rangers...
...Marios scored a goal against his old team, went and picked up the puck, skated over to the Rangers bench and threw the puck to head coach Craig Patrick (Patrick was also the GM at the time who traded Marois to Vancouver).

Mayhem ensued as all the Ranger players tried to get at Marois (Ed Hospodar was trying to come of the bench to get at him and was being restrained).
Barry Beck ultimately did get a hold of him.

He lasted a very short time in Vancouver. One of the oddest acquisitions in team history. We traded for him based on one game, giving up a young former 1st round pick (Jere Gillis), and then moved him a few months later for a journeyman (Gary Larivierre) who would play 90+ more NHL games before being out of the NHL.
Meanwhile Marois played almost 900 more NHL games before retiring. Gillis played only slightly more than Larivierre.

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04-15-2017, 09:47 AM
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Michael Whiteacre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IComeInPeace View Post
I used to go to Canuck games all the time with my father...

It was the 80-81 season, and the Rag's were in town.
I was still just a very young boy. Both my dad and I were largely unfamiliar with Marios and his game.

Well, he made everyone in the Pacific Coliseum take notice that night. He was such a crazy crap disturber that night (he also had a very effective game). He had everyone in the building booing him at every turn because he was such a pain in the arse that night.

The Canucks traded for him after that game; about 2 weeks later the Nucks played the Rangers...
...Marios scored a goal against his old team, went and picked up the puck, skated over to the Rangers bench and threw the puck to head coach Craig Patrick (Patrick was also the GM at the time who traded Marois to Vancouver).

Mayhem ensued as all the Ranger players tried to get at Marois (Ed Hospodar was trying to come of the bench to get at him and was being restrained).
Barry Beck ultimately did get a hold of him.

He lasted a very short time in Vancouver. One of the oddest acquisitions in team history. We traded for him based on one game, giving up a young former 1st round pick (Jere Gillis), and then moved him a few months later for a journeyman (Gary Larivierre) who would play 90+ more NHL games before being out of the NHL.
Meanwhile Marois played almost 900 more NHL games before retiring. Gillis played only slightly more than Larivierre.
Mario Marois even returned to the Vancouver Canucks twelve seasons later, but he didn't make an official regular season appearance for the Canucks in '92-'93 as he was with the Hamilton Canucks minor league team from the AHL, and he wasn't even in the NHL.

He last appeared in the NHL in '91-'92 when he split the year between the St. Louis Blues and a second but short lived stint with the Winnipeg Jets as a strict defensive-minded blueliner, but he definitely deserved to be a blueline partner for Jyrki Lumme on the Vancouver Canucks in '92-'93 though, unless Vancouver opted to utilize Lumme, Gerald Diduck, Jiri Slegr, Dana Murzyn, Dave Babych, Doug Lidster and Adrien Plavsic over calling Mario Marois up to the Canucks' parent team to serve as a frequent Press Box habitant for being an extra blueliner.


Last edited by Michael Whiteacre: 04-15-2017 at 09:56 AM.
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Old
04-16-2017, 05:42 PM
  #9
Dennis Bonvie
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What I remember most about Marois was his stick use. He was a hatchet man.

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04-19-2017, 09:04 PM
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FerrisRox
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Originally Posted by Michael Whiteacre View Post
...in addition to being considered for the 1983-84 James Norris Trophy, which was ultimately won by Rod Langway of the Washington Capitals.
Uh... no. This is just silly. Marios was never even in the stratosphere of consideration for a Norris Trophy.

Here's a little context. Langway won the Norris that year by receiving 227 votes. Mario Marios, in turn, received one vote, a 3rd place vote, that I suspect came from a Quebec beat writer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Whiteacre View Post
...in addition to being considered for the 1987-88 James Norris Trophy that eventually went to Ray Bourque of the Boston Bruins.
Uh... no again, but a tiny bit closer though it is still an absurd stretch to say he was in any way "in consideration.

Ray Bourque received 266 votes. Marios got one second place and two third place votes.

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Old
04-19-2017, 09:09 PM
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FerrisRox
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Originally Posted by Michael Whiteacre View Post
Mario Marois even returned to the Vancouver Canucks twelve seasons later, but he didn't make an official regular season appearance for the Canucks in '92-'93 as he was with the Hamilton Canucks minor league team from the AHL, and he wasn't even in the NHL.

He last appeared in the NHL in '91-'92 when he split the year between the St. Louis Blues and a second but short lived stint with the Winnipeg Jets as a strict defensive-minded blueliner, but he definitely deserved to be a blueline partner for Jyrki Lumme on the Vancouver Canucks in '92-'93 though, unless Vancouver opted to utilize Lumme, Gerald Diduck, Jiri Slegr, Dana Murzyn, Dave Babych, Doug Lidster and Adrien Plavsic over calling Mario Marois up to the Canucks' parent team to serve as a frequent Press Box habitant for being an extra blueliner.
Mario was never Vancouver property that season and he definitely didn't deserve to be in the NHL, he was clearly done.

Marios signed with Hamilton as a player/coach but it was strictly an AHL contract. He was not signed to or affiliated with Vancouver at all.

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