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Russian hockey journalists

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Old
07-11-2017, 12:12 AM
  #51
Siberian
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Originally Posted by malkinfan View Post
He has followed that up the past 5 hours or so with continued political trash, the reason people watch sports is to get away from all that. He has even managed to bash Ovi and Kovi regarding political issues. If you have an opinion, that's one thing if to post it. If you are going to bash someone else opinion by insulting them... Especially Ovie

Wonder if he ever lurks around this forum.
Hockey community is small so I am pretty sure a lot of people related to hockey one way or another read this forum. I saw bunch of NHL players reading it. Funniest one I saw was one of swedes who participated in u20 wc was reading a thread about himself and giggled.

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07-11-2017, 12:29 AM
  #52
Nino33
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Originally Posted by malkinfan View Post
Wrong, look up defined pensions and shortfalls being publicly funded. Thats a huge difference from the mass majority of Ontario residents who typically have defined contribution or nothing. Im a CPA at a partnership where I get squat for a pension because that's what the market demands (as would be the case for the teachers if the union was ditched). So I have my own fund using ETFs. Huge difference. At the time of the OTPP was selling TMLSE there was a massive shortfall in the plan and they were having the tax payer match contributions to fill the shortfall.

If you cant see the irony in the article that was making fun of publicly funded hockey team (obviously different scales, but the author forgot to do a 2 second google search) then please dont bother me anymore.
I don't see how having shortfalls covered = "full taxpayer funded" (the teachers and their employer contributed lots).


Last edited by Caser: 07-11-2017 at 01:17 AM. Reason: no need for that
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Old
07-11-2017, 01:20 AM
  #53
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I think discussing Malamud in this thread is pretty much an off-topic, as he doesn't have any relation to Russia nowadays, aside from his favorite topic (imo, not much relation to journalism too).

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07-11-2017, 07:58 AM
  #54
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Originally Posted by Siberian View Post
It's shallow as everything he does and another sensasinalism by Yakov Smirnoff to uneducated public. We discussed this issue here in much better detail. Problem here is if hockey in Russia does not sell tickets for $50 - it can't survive without subsidizers. However, there is even more to that. In Russia all pro-sports are subsidized, outside perhaps of professional boxing. The choice is to stop subsidizing and lose a lot of sports as Russia had in 1990's or continue subsidizing and hoping that 10-15 years from now the wealth will be enough to support many pro-sports with true sponsorships and ticket sales. I think the answer is easy.
The easiest answer is to make economic and/or political (local and global) decisions that improve the economy (diversify from enery based prodcution) so that people will have more money and thus more money to spend on sports.

Somewhat on that topic, is pay-tv sports doing well in Russia? Meaning is there plenty of it on offer and how many people have pay-tv packages? For reference, pay-tv sports in Nordic countries differs. In Sweden and Norway something like 60% of the population have a pay-tv package where as in Finland, only 30%.

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07-11-2017, 08:44 AM
  #55
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
The easiest answer is to make economic and/or political (local and global) decisions that improve the economy (diversify from enery based prodcution) so that people will have more money and thus more money to spend on sports.

Somewhat on that topic, is pay-tv sports doing well in Russia? Meaning is there plenty of it on offer and how many people have pay-tv packages? For reference, pay-tv sports in Nordic countries differs. In Sweden and Norway something like 60% of the population have a pay-tv package where as in Finland, only 30%.
In terms of pay-tv, I think separate sports packages aren't too popular, most common pay-tv example in former USSR countries is a 60-100 channel package with some sports channels in it. Overall pay-tv penetration rate in Russia was estimated at 72% back in 2015, and I'd say over 90% of those would be those kind of packages.

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07-11-2017, 10:18 AM
  #56
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
The easiest answer is to make economic and/or political (local and global) decisions that improve the economy (diversify from enery based prodcution) so that people will have more money and thus more money to spend on sports.

Somewhat on that topic, is pay-tv sports doing well in Russia? Meaning is there plenty of it on offer and how many people have pay-tv packages? For reference, pay-tv sports in Nordic countries differs. In Sweden and Norway something like 60% of the population have a pay-tv package where as in Finland, only 30%.
How fast should the economy grow? Sorry, but there are basic laws to it. [Mod]

Russian economy is quite fast growing, but that doesn't mean we can give people say double the income without damaging the whole thing. [Mod] There is a very complicated interdependence. Saying, oh just limprove the economy is an equal of the fake Marie Antoinette quote.

Pay-tv is basically the past. The internet is agglomerating tv very fast in Russia. Faster than in many european countries. There are additional packages to be bought, but most basic packages would give you enough access to hockey to be specific.

I for my part don't even have cable at home. All I need is coming through the internets on my mobile, including tv channels. I know I am not most people, but I guess soon enough a lot of people will have it that way.

For now most households have KHL TV, Match TV and Eurosport(NHL) available through cable packaged with the basic internet access via ISP. And it is rather cheap. Additional packages are more of a thing to die hard football fans who want to follow foreign top leagues.


Last edited by stv11: 07-12-2017 at 03:15 AM. Reason: Too political
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07-12-2017, 08:34 AM
  #57
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Originally Posted by Atas2000 View Post
How fast should the economy grow? Sorry, but there are basic laws to it. [Mod]

Russian economy is quite fast growing, but that doesn't mean we can give people say double the income without damaging the whole thing. [Mod] There is a very complicated interdependence. Saying, oh just limprove the economy is an equal of the fake Marie Antoinette quote.

Pay-tv is basically the past. The internet is agglomerating tv very fast in Russia. Faster than in many european countries. There are additional packages to be bought, but most basic packages would give you enough access to hockey to be specific.

I for my part don't even have cable at home. All I need is coming through the internets on my mobile, including tv channels. I know I am not most people, but I guess soon enough a lot of people will have it that way.

For now most households have KHL TV, Match TV and Eurosport(NHL) available through cable packaged with the basic internet access via ISP. And it is rather cheap. Additional packages are more of a thing to die hard football fans who want to follow foreign top leagues.
More like modest: https://www.un.org/development/desa/...iefing-no-103/

The major hurdle over here with sports pay-tv is that the pricing isn't overly high but not very enticing to average consumers, but rather that the sports broadcasting rights have been spreadout so that consumers would have to buy several packages to watch their favorite sports/leagues. Viasat has the rights to the NHL, EPLA, La Liga and UCL for now (KHL rights ended after last season) and they will lose the UCL after this season to MTV3 who hold the rights to the hockey Worlds and Formula 1. People can live without F1.


Last edited by Jussi: 07-12-2017 at 04:32 PM.
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07-12-2017, 04:05 PM
  #58
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
More like modest: https://www.un.org/development/desa/...iefing-no-103/

The major hurdle over here with sports pay-tv is that the pricing isn't overly high but not very enticing to average consumers, but rather that the sports broadcasting rights have been spreadout so that consumers would have to buy several packages to watch their favorite sports/leagues. Viasat has the rights to the NHL, EPLA, La Liga and UCL for now (KHL rights ended after last season) and they will lose the UCL after this season to MTV3 who hold the rights to the hockey Worlds and Formula 1. Peopla can live without F1.
Let's not debate economics. It is indeed a much more complicated matter than those simplified ratings.

I know my father can live without F1, but he wouldn't like it. And yes, most popular sports are all available in basic packages in Russia except for the mentioned football leagues. So there we have the advantage of less competition for the average customer. Like I said economics is not always straight forward.

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07-15-2017, 10:43 AM
  #59
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
The easiest answer is to make economic and/or political (local and global) decisions that improve the economy (diversify from enery based prodcution) so that people will have more money and thus more money to spend on sports.

Somewhat on that topic, is pay-tv sports doing well in Russia? Meaning is there plenty of it on offer and how many people have pay-tv packages? For reference, pay-tv sports in Nordic countries differs. In Sweden and Norway something like 60% of the population have a pay-tv package where as in Finland, only 30%.
Sport is in fact a very potent economic stimulus by itself. In the US and Canada, cities cannot be considered "major" unless they can show affiliation with major sports leagues. Such sports teams generate revenue and popular interest that serve as an attraction for planning conventions and tourism. Sport is one kind of stimulus that the Russian government, or any other government, can use to stimulate commercial business, such as television, advertising, merchandising, etc. You see people wearing the shirts of their favorite teams everywhere!

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07-15-2017, 11:32 AM
  #60
Jussi
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Originally Posted by Yakushev72 View Post
Sport is in fact a very potent economic stimulus by itself. In the US and Canada, cities cannot be considered "major" unless they can show affiliation with major sports leagues. Such sports teams generate revenue and popular interest that serve as an attraction for planning conventions and tourism. Sport is one kind of stimulus that the Russian government, or any other government, can use to stimulate commercial business, such as television, advertising, merchandising, etc. You see people wearing the shirts of their favorite teams everywhere!
Yes, I recognize how sports teams can be used as status symbols. But in the area of economics, there's so much more advertising and television money involved in the US and Canada that the teams have a good chance of making profit, assuming they're well run.Government doesn't have to get involved.

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07-15-2017, 05:14 PM
  #61
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Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
Yes, I recognize how sports teams can be used as status symbols. But in the area of economics, there's so much more advertising and television money involved in the US and Canada that the teams have a good chance of making profit, assuming they're well run.Government doesn't have to get involved.
Not just advertising and TV money, but ticket revenue that covers the salaries of the players!




In NA smaller cities have teams too, many are not "major cities" (fans covering expenses or close to it via ticket sales is the difference, not outside factors/city size) & I don't think sports are a potent economic stimulus at all! Sports are for disposable income that's already in an area (if the community doesn't have the money/economic activity to support the team, the team itself most definetly doesn't create economic activity/value!)

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Yesterday, 05:14 AM
  #62
Alessandro Seren Rosso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malkinfan View Post
Yes Duhatschek did a good article years back, he called up Barry Smith and got detailed for his article.

Lots of English speaking guys willing to do interviews but you rarely have it. Keenan did a great interview for the KHL web page where he said things that would be painful for Malamud to reproduce on his twitter feed. Of course all of the NA news outlets produced the news about Keenan going to Kunlun but none reproduced any of his interesting quotes regarding the league. Go figure
I can't find this interview. Do you have a link?

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