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Set me straight on Pittsburgh (NHR)

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Old
05-12-2004, 11:50 PM
  #1
louisleftwing
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Set me straight on Pittsburgh (NHR)

Hey boys, how's it been? First, let me say I'm still around (I0 still read these boards every few days) and am still very much a Pens fan. I'm awaiting the draft and rooting for the Baby Pens on their quest for the Calder Cup.

I've been pretty busy this past year with being a senior at Maryland and all that goes with that, getting most of my stuff together for attending law school in 2005, and securing good employment for the interim.

What brings me to post is some questions about Pitt and the city of Pittsburgh itself. With my numbers, Pitt should be a pretty safe bet. I need to find safety schools, and Pitt is an option because it's still a very good school (47th out of about 180 or so schools in USN&WR, which puts it in the "first tier").

I wasn't looking to Pitt at first because I didn't want others to think I was just going there for the Pens. I'm not worried about that now. My father's from the area (Beaver County) but left when he was around 10. The couple of times I've visited family, I never went to the city. I don't know much about it.

I did a bit of research and found out a few interesting things. It seems Pittsburgh gets a bad rap of being a crap town because of its history. Most people that have been there say it's the nicest of the rust belt cities they've been to. And, once you get past the people that think "if it's not New York or Chicago then a city's worthless," most seem to like the place.

Pittsburgh actually ranked third in a ranking of best cities for young lawyers. It cited solid base salary, relatively lower hours worked, low crime rates, low cost of living, etc. I've heard of Pittsburgh having all the amenities of a big city without most of the hastles.

Pitt has a lot of positives as a school. Other than being a good school and a safe bet, it is an urban campus, which would be best for me. I wouldn't have to come back home for a worthwhile job over the summer, like I would have to if in a college town in the middle of nowhere. At the same time, Pitt is no small school placed in the city; it's got a pretty well-developed university community. Employment stats are pretty good, too.

What are your thoughts on the school or the city? Thanks.

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05-12-2004, 11:54 PM
  #2
Big McLargehuge
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Almost everyone that hates the city has never been here, I've met very few people who didn't enjoy their experience.

To most of the nation we're a soot filled city with nothing but steel mills and more steel mills...

My sister went to Pitt for grad school and she enjoyed it. I myself don't really have much knowledge about the school though outside of sports. I've never been interested to go there because of location.

I ****ing hate Oakland. I want somewhere serene, like Penn State(State College) or Colorado State(Fort Collins).

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05-13-2004, 12:12 AM
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Holly Gunning
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I went to Pitt as an undergrad and I loved it.

And I'd move back to Pittsburgh if the opportunity arose. Real nice people, lots of stuff to do. Good public transportation. Very pretty with the rivers and bridges.

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05-13-2004, 12:38 AM
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by louisleftwing
Pittsburgh actually ranked third in a ranking of best cities for young lawyers. It cited solid base salary, relatively lower hours worked, low crime rates, low cost of living, etc. I've heard of Pittsburgh having all the amenities of a big city without most of the hastles.

What are your thoughts on the school or the city? Thanks.
I am an attorney in Pittsburgh and have been here in practice since 1987. I went to law school at the University of Florida in Gainesville but came to Pittsburgh to practice and actually gave a bit up to do so, Florida was then and continues to be booming. But the things you listed, as well as an actual change of seasons and having family in the area brought me back and I never regretted it. We have one of the busiest famiy divisions in the entire country here, and I never wanted for work, the mixture of small big town (you can find almost anything here, from plays and culture to sports both watching and playing to mountains to 4 ski resorts within an hours drive, to some of the best restuarants I can think of anywhere (I would put Montery Bay seafood against almost any seafood restaurant I have ever been to nation and world wide) . . . I could go on, but will end by saying professionally (if law if your choice) and as a place to call home I can not recommend Pittsburgh more highly.

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Old
05-13-2004, 04:30 PM
  #5
craig1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by louisleftwing
Most people that have been there say it's the nicest of the rust belt cities they've been to.
Yeah.....good thought. Nicest of the rust-belt cities.....just like being the smartest of the students who failed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Handsome B. Wonderful
Almost everyone that hates the city has never been here, I've met very few people who didn't enjoy their experience.
Glad you used almost. I am not a fan of the city, but do not let me deter you. I lived there from ages 3 to 18, and 22 to 27. I will never move back. The city is OK for a short term, but it lacks any long-term entertainment venues (outside of sports). And yes people, I was a regular at the shows in the "cultural district," etc.

Again, that is just my opinion. It was way too Blue-Collar for me, and seemed like it was either stuck in the past, very old (population is one of oldest in nation) or had younger kids who took pride in doing their best to be ignorant trash.

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05-13-2004, 04:45 PM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craig1
Again, that is just my opinion. It was way too Blue-Collar for me, and seemed like it was either stuck in the past, very old (population is one of oldest in nation) or had younger kids who took pride in doing their best to be ignorant trash.
Id agree, for the most part, with what youre saying.

Pittsburgh is a city still trying to find itself. Its not really a blue collar city aymore. Not since the mills closed down. But people still have a blue collar attitude and want to be a blue collar city.

The city needs to move more in a white collar direction so it can move into the future. But in the meantime, while its still trying to find itself, all the young people are leaving in droves.

Its not a bad place. Except for entertainment its got everything youd relly need in a big city without excessive crime or traffic. The people are pretty nice even though drivers in PA are pretty terrible.

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05-14-2004, 12:08 AM
  #7
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One thing about Pittsburgh, well the area I live in, is that there are too many older people holding the city back. None of the older people want change that would be good for the city (or area I live in anyway-don't know how it is other places).

It also seems like we are being taxed way too much. I'm sure there are alot of taxes everywhere, and I'm not real big into politics and following taxes everywhere, but it just seems like there are so many taxes here. And they'll be going up again soon with the debt of the city of Pittsburgh.

While the blue collar people are probably holding the city back a bit, I do like that aspect of it. Most the people around here were raised to work hard because our parents worked in the mills and didn't get the white collar jobs.

Another good about the city, I like to travel and have been many places, and Pittsburgh is definately has the nicest group of people around.

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Old
05-14-2004, 04:23 PM
  #8
craig1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PensFan68
It also seems like we are being taxed way too much. I'm sure there are alot of taxes everywhere, and I'm not real big into politics and following taxes everywhere, but it just seems like there are so many taxes here. And they'll be going up again soon with the debt of the city of Pittsburgh.
Here, I agree. Personal income taxes are relatively high comparitively speaking, although I do not know the national rank currently. Corporate Tax rates are one of the worst in the nation, therefore it is near impossible to attract a business....unless it comes for a subsidy and flees when that expires.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PensFan68
While the blue collar people are probably holding the city back a bit, I do like that aspect of it. Most the people around here were raised to work hard because our parents worked in the mills and didn't get the white collar jobs.
That is one of the most rediculous implications that I have ever heard. I have a "White-Collar" job. I work harder than most "Blue Collar" people I know. Just becuase a job involves using an acquired intellect and critical thinking skills, developed from secondary and post-secondary education does not mean it is easy work. In fact, it would be a lot easier for me to go do a "Blue Collar" job, than for someone working a "blue Collar" job to come and try their hand at what I do.

...........In other words, do not make such off the wall, unfounded statements.

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05-14-2004, 05:50 PM
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craig1
Here, I agree. Personal income taxes are relatively high comparitively speaking, although I do not know the national rank currently. Corporate Tax rates are one of the worst in the nation, therefore it is near impossible to attract a business....unless it comes for a subsidy and flees when that expires.



That is one of the most rediculous implications that I have ever heard. I have a "White-Collar" job. I work harder than most "Blue Collar" people I know. Just becuase a job involves using an acquired intellect and critical thinking skills, developed from secondary and post-secondary education does not mean it is easy work. In fact, it would be a lot easier for me to go do a "Blue Collar" job, than for someone working a "blue Collar" job to come and try their hand at what I do.

...........In other words, do not make such off the wall, unfounded statements.
Having worked both manual labor during summer work a few years back and doing my engineering coop now, I actually feel more drained from trying to problem solve and thinking. I like the work, but it is def not easier than manual labor. Another thing is involving "blue collar" work usually ends when you leave for the day. I cant say that for "white collar" work.

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Old
05-14-2004, 06:02 PM
  #10
DJ Spinoza
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craig1
That is one of the most rediculous implications that I have ever heard. I have a "White-Collar" job. I work harder than most "Blue Collar" people I know. Just becuase a job involves using an acquired intellect and critical thinking skills, developed from secondary and post-secondary education does not mean it is easy work. In fact, it would be a lot easier for me to go do a "Blue Collar" job, than for someone working a "blue Collar" job to come and try their hand at what I do.

...........In other words, do not make such off the wall, unfounded statements.
I don't think he ever insinuated that. He just said that blue collar people are hard working, which is true. I've worked with blue collar people enough to really respect what they do, even though I will likely opt for a "white collar" job.

All it seems like PF68 said was that people had to work hard in their blue collar jobs, not that white collar jobs are any easier.

Different strokes for different folks is what I say. Some people are meant to do one kind of thing, some are meant to do another. But I don't think anyone is any better than anyone else just because of their job, and from how I read it, and from what I know of PF68, how you read it is not what he meant.

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Old
05-14-2004, 07:05 PM
  #11
Jeff Goldblum
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Yeah, the blue collar thing is pretty relevant here. Everyone has great work ethics ('cept me). It shows in that football is the most popular sport, atleast i think thats one of teh reasons its so popular.

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Old
05-14-2004, 08:53 PM
  #12
louisleftwing
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Guys, thanks for all the responses. It's nice to see these different viewpoints.

Jaded-Fan - You mentioned something about Florida being booming. With your knowledge as an attorney, what markets do you believe are most "booming" now or may be in the future. I realize that could depend on many factors, like practice area. Unfortunately, I don't yet have one in mind.

Craig1 - That "rust-belt" comment reads kinda funny now that I see it. The person that said it meant well, though. I see your location says San Diego. I hear good things about San Diego. Do you have any comments on that city? Problem with California and law school is that there are some great ones (Stanford, UCLA, USC) that I wouldn't get into. And then there are some good ones (Davis, Hastings) where I'd be more competitive, but I wouldn't find it wise to go across the country for those schools. I'd get into some better ones closer to home. Unless I knew for sure I wanted to practice out there or something, they aren't good fits.

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Old
05-14-2004, 09:27 PM
  #13
craig1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by louisleftwing
Craig1 - That "rust-belt" comment reads kinda funny now that I see it. The person that said it meant well, though. I see your location says San Diego. I hear good things about San Diego. Do you have any comments on that city? Problem with California and law school is that there are some great ones (Stanford, UCLA, USC) that I wouldn't get into. And then there are some good ones (Davis, Hastings) where I'd be more competitive, but I wouldn't find it wise to go across the country for those schools. I'd get into some better ones closer to home. Unless I knew for sure I wanted to practice out there or something, they aren't good fits.

Well, like every place there are the goods and the bads. Out here, you have perpetual sunshine and warm weather year round. People are extremely laid back and friendly.....yes, I find the friendlier than in Pittsburgh. A lot of that has to do with the laid back attitude. You can go to the beach, go to the desert, go to the mountains, all within 45 minutes of wherever you are. Skiing is about 2 hours away, not to mention a quick drive to Vegas.

Again, the drawback out here is that everyone want to live here. In turn, the price to buy a home is outrageous. I've been looking at homes for around $500,000. That's a starter home that needs work. Again though, its all about quality of life!

Also, I know there are a lot of law schools out here. Both Tier I and Tier II. I really don't know about Tier III, but I assume they would be of no interest anyway given the ones you mention!


Last edited by craig1: 05-14-2004 at 09:31 PM.
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Old
05-14-2004, 09:29 PM
  #14
craig1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrKnowNothing
I don't think he ever insinuated that. He just said that blue collar people are hard working, which is true. I've worked with blue collar people enough to really respect what they do, even though I will likely opt for a "white collar" job.

No, he said they had to work hard because they didn't get the "White Collar jobs."

Quote:
While the blue collar people are probably holding the city back a bit, I do like that aspect of it. Most the people around here were raised to work hard because our parents worked in the mills and didn't get the white collar jobs.
That implies that if they had "White Collar" jobs, they would not have had to work hard.

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